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Fedora 9 KDE Rawhide (2008-04-04)

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  • Fedora 9 KDE Rawhide (2008-04-04)

    Phoronix: Fedora 9 KDE Rawhide (2008-04-04)

    The beta of Fedora 9 was released just short of two weeks ago, but the Fedora Project has released new Rawhide snapshots of Fedora in its live form. No installation DVDs are being made available due to bugs, but there are 2008-04-04 Rawhide snapshos for both the GNOME and KDE LiveCDs. The KDE spin is already upgraded against the just-released KDE 4.0.3 release, which most noticeably has KHTML, KWin, and Okular improvements. Here's a few screenshots from Fedora 9 Live KDE (2008-04-04 Rawhide).

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=12156

  • #2
    Sad that Red Hat doesn't lift a finger to help KDE

    Red Hat and Fedora are currently among the worst distros when it comes to supporting KDE. There is no way to have a KDE desktop by itself in Fedora because all the system tools are built on GNOME -- look how the installer sticks out like a sore thumb within KDE. If Red Hat devs have to lift a finger to accommodate KDE, there's only one answer you'll get from them: too bad, we won't do it.

    This anti-KDE policy stems from a corporate decision Red Hat has made long ago to standardize on LGPL-licensed GTK so that ISVs can make binary blobs without giving anything back. That's why if you're siding with free and open source software, KDE is the desktop for you.

    Kubuntu has done a better job making sure that all the needed system utilities are built using Qt/KDE so that no GNOME components are needed on a Kubuntu installation.

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    • #3
      I am interested in how Kubuntu 8.10 with KDE 4.1 will be. (K)Ubuntu's LCD subpixel patches look great (Fedora's fonts suck tbh), but I don't like their KDE 3.5 integration... too much unneeded custom stuff like Dolphin 3 etc. in there... Debian's KDE integration is the best, because they use the software's defaults.

      KDE 4.1-svn is now in Debian/experimental, and it might make it into Debian/lenny... that would be awesome

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      • #4
        Originally posted by d2kx View Post
        I am interested in how Kubuntu 8.10 with KDE 4.1 will be... I don't like their KDE 3.5 integration... too much unneeded custom stuff like Dolphin 3 etc. in there.
        The good news is that the main Kubuntu developer, Jonathan Riddell, is working to push Kubuntu-specific patches to upstream KDE. He's getting a lot of useful feedback from KDE devs, which results in improving the patches so that they are acceptable to and work for everyone.

        http://lists.kde.org/?t=120603155400003&r=1&w=2

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        • #5
          Originally posted by stan View Post
          This anti-KDE policy stems from a corporate decision Red Hat has made long ago to standardize on LGPL-licensed GTK so that ISVs can make binary blobs without giving anything back. That's why if you're siding with free and open source software, KDE is the desktop for you.
          Lol, and I thought I was being an extremist (I don't want to install any package that is not OSS) ... Using some closed source apps installed in user's homes looks ok to me, and the even most insidious problem is that GPL also excludes a lot of fairly valid [for applications] licenses, such as the ASF license. And it's all atually a commercial ploy: if you want to build a closed source KDE app, you simply have to pay Trolltech. There's nothing grand or noble in that.

          The license choice makes it certain it will have no success beyond the hardcore nerd crowd. If you want KDE's success, you should be advocating for a license change ...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by remm View Post
            if you want to build a closed source KDE app, you simply have to pay Trolltech. There's nothing grand or noble in that.
            The money Trolltech receives goes into improving Qt, which is Free and Open Source software and which directly helps FOSS developers and users like myself.

            The fact that unscrupulous makers of binary blobs need to pay a tax that goes into improving FOSS software is a very positive thing. This is how copyleft was intended to work from the very beginning, see the essay by RMS titled Selling Free Software.

            Originally posted by remm View Post
            the even most insidious problem is that GPL also excludes a lot of fairly valid [for applications] licenses, such as the ASF license.
            Trolltech has been very responsive to ensuring compatibility with other FOSS licenses, evident by the fact that they have dual-licensed Qt on all platforms under GPLv2 and GPLv3.
            Last edited by stan; 04-06-2008, 09:22 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by stan View Post
              The money Trolltech receives goes into improving Qt, which is Free and Open Source software and which directly helps FOSS developers and users like myself.

              The fact that unscrupulous makers of binary blobs need to pay a tax that goes into improving FOSS software is a very positive thing. This is how copyleft was intended to work from the very beginning, see the essay by RMS titled Selling Free Software.



              Trolltech has been very responsive to ensuring compatibility with other FOSS licenses, evident by the fact that they have dual-licensed Qt on all platforms under GPLv2 and GPLv3.
              well, as long as qt remains at least under gpl2 is good and having nokia to directly support it is not bad at all. also, i really believe that qtopia would increase nokia's future phones usability.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by stan View Post
                Red Hat and Fedora are currently among the worst distros when it comes to supporting KDE. There is no way to have a KDE desktop by itself in Fedora because all the system tools are built on GNOME -- look how the installer sticks out like a sore thumb within KDE. If Red Hat devs have to lift a finger to accommodate KDE, there's only one answer you'll get from them: too bad, we won't do it.

                This anti-KDE policy stems from a corporate decision Red Hat has made long ago to standardize on LGPL-licensed GTK so that ISVs can make binary blobs without giving anything back. That's why if you're siding with free and open source software, KDE is the desktop for you.

                Kubuntu has done a better job making sure that all the needed system utilities are built using Qt/KDE so that no GNOME components are needed on a Kubuntu installation.
                That's why I don't use Fedora anymore, which is a shame cause I loved FC5 and that's what made me stay with Linux full-time.

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