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CentOS 7 Release Relives RHEL7 As A Community Project

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  • #11
    Finally been waiting for it since the day I knew which kernel RHEL7 used, as I really wanted that release was to use bcache feature that was patched in 3.10 kernel, has I got a 500GB HD and a 64GB SSD in my laptop. Sadly will have to fiddle with it manually to use, as bcache is only planned to be added to anaconda in Fedora 22. I just hope bcache-tools package is in centos repository.

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    • #12
      I found something interesting a while ago. Oracle repackages RHEL and distributes it for free, however it also provides a much newer kernel (3.8.13). So for those of you having issues with wifi cards on RHEL 6.x or CentOS 6.x then you might want to give it a shot.

      http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/se...w-2043074.html

      Personally I prefer the Gnome 2 desktop to whatever RH has attempted to make out of the ruins of Gnome 3 so if anyone else feels the same, I suggest they keep with Oracle EL for a while longer (unless Mate or Xfce from the EPEL repo is working perfectly).
      Last edited by kpedersen; 07-08-2014, 07:50 AM.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
        Personally I prefer the Gnome 2 desktop to whatever RH has attempted to make out of the ruins of Gnome 3 so if anyone else feels the same, I suggest they keep with Oracle EL for a while longer (unless Mate or Xfce from the EPEL repo is working perfectly).
        EPEL 7 is still in beta, but Xfce, MATE, and Cinnamon should (hopefully) be available via EPEL. You can already install MATE instead of GNOME or KDE if you add EPEL 7 to your installation sources, but there are currently still some installation error messages. I agree that for anyone who uses RHEL (or derivatives) as a workstation/desktop, it is a little early to switch over to EL7 even if EL6 is long in the tooth, particularly since third-party repos haven't entirely caught up.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by kde185 View Post
          In my experience CentOS has been the only distro with reliable support for the binary video drivers. Ubuntu, Fedora, etc. I'm always afraid that some random update will break API/ABI compatibility with a driver. If you need/want the binary drivers then it's best to go with CentOS or a LTS Ubuntu release, because that's what the drivers are primarily targeting.
          I would like to add Sabayon Linux to this list. I have been using it a while without any problems with the binary video drivers. They came in with the installation and actually work a lot better than in Ubuntu. (I am using an AMD card).

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          • #15
            About my only concern with this is that Kernel 3.10 does not have support for radeon dpm, which could be a problem on some of my machines.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by r0ck View Post
              Think about it that way, this distribution is made so enterprise operations can have long-term reliable software that doesn't change much and just performs without anyone touching it. I work with CentOS all the time professionally and it's very nice. You don't get bleeding edge features or snazzy looks like with some modern distros out of the box but you can install anything you like after the fact, if you absolutely want to. With the EPEL repository (Extra packages for Enterprise Linux afaik) you can get pretty much anything a "normal" user would need. Bug- and Security Fixes are backported to the supported kernels and packages so you don't have to worry about that either. It's got SE Linux and is very stable from what I can tell.

              I run a few productive machines on CentOS 6.5 and so far not one has made any problems even though I regularly update the kernels and packages every 2-3 months.

              It's definitely worth a shot. It's not as pretty or simple to use as some other distros but other than those it's rock solid.
              Centos can be a great foundation for a home media and file server where you pretty much can set it up once and then forget about it aside from updating it every so often. Also it can be a great learning tool for people aspiring to become sysadmins.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                Centos can be a great foundation for a home media and file server where you pretty much can set it up once and then forget about it aside from updating it every so often. Also it can be a great learning tool for people aspiring to become sysadmins.
                Kind of why I'm doing it... well okay, I already am a system administrator, but I spent most of my career using Debian (mainly because a smart administrator is a lazy administrator, and Debian has tons of pre-packaged software that just works 90% of the time with an apt-get install. The other 10% requires a bit of configuration and it works 'til the end of time, and can upgrade between major releases).

                I recently started a job where they're more or less standardizing upon CentOS. So I figured I'd try out the newer version and see where it's going. usually CentOS/RHEL and Debian Stable are about the same version wise on software. Seems this time it's a little out of whack, not sure if it's because RHEL 7 took so long to release, or because Debian 8.0 is just right around the corner. Probably the latter, but I think Debian 8.0 is going to land with the 3.14 kernel, rather than 3.10.

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