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  • #16
    Well of course does the system break if you remove essential repositories. That's not my point. My point is that I don't have to do anything other then to run regularly updates to get news stuff. The stuff that is not in the Tumbleweed repos gets updated less often, but it gets updated without me doing anything (but running updates) -> rolling.
    For the end user there's no difference if the packages in the repository and the symlink to the real repository changes. All I see is updates to packages.
    This is different to what is Arch is doing, but the result is the same!

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    • #17
      (Sorry for the double post, can't edit anymore)

      What if they would simply copy over all the missing packages to the rumbleweed repository? Would it become a true rolling release?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by droste View Post
        (Sorry for the double post, can't edit anymore)

        What if they would simply copy over all the missing packages to the rumbleweed repository? Would it become a true rolling release?
        To your former post, that's the same as putting stable instead of wheezy in Debian sources.list, and I think we both agree Debian stable isn't a Rolling release.

        And yes, if you added the missing packages Tumbleweed would be a rolling release distro. But there is a reason they are missing. Namely the difference between running a repository with low dependency stuff and running a distribution channel like the 13.1 branch or factory. Switching the kernel up a few versions or backporting even the whole of gnome from factory/obs isn't that work intensive, add x11, Mesa and the entire base system to that... The workload is magnitudes greater as there are many more permutations to test.

        If making a rolling release was easy we would see more of them, arch is popular after all, but I think it's pretty much a either or thing. You either have controlled cycle with beta versions, freezes or you do it the arch way. They are mutually exclusive as far as I can see.

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        • #19
          Ok. Lets leave it at this point. I agree Arch and Tumbleweed do it differently, but I still think the outcome for the user is the same and I think neither of us will switch positions

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          • #20
            Originally posted by droste View Post
            Ok. Lets leave it at this point. I agree Arch and Tumbleweed do it differently, but I still think the outcome for the user is the same and I think neither of us will switch positions
            Fair enough, though i still get nervous tick in my eyelid when i hear you comparing Arch and Tumbleweed like that . Though i do agree that the superficial outcome is very similar to an enduser in the long run.

            Really my only issue with tumbleweed was that it breaks package dependancies with repositaries intended for 13.1, like the one from X11 giving you recent mesa or the one from nvidia giving you nvidia drivers. I either need Mesa for my HD4000 integrated or i need Nvidia for my Geforce. Sadly Nouveau leads to heavy graphical corruption after about 15min that can only be fixed by rebooting, while mesa 9 means i can't play games since its just too slow compared to recent mesa versions .

            I heard though that opensuse is working on making the Factory repository stable enough to use it directly, which would be very interesting. Won't help with external repos though i guess, Arch fixes that b having stuff like nvidia drivers in the main repo, something opensuse won't do due to license issues.

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