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The Latest Distro Trying For Commercial Success Uses Arch & Wayland

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  • #16
    So... they just want a linux desktop with the mint menu and synapse indicator. What a revolution.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by alazar View Post
      So... they just want a linux desktop with the mint menu and synapse indicator. What a revolution.
      Don't forget the huge focus on asking for money. I'd say that's their biggest revolution so far.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by TheSoulz View Post
        There needs to be a balance bettwen free and "usable".
        There is truth to that I believe. I remember arguing hard on a forum ten years ago that we should make it dead easy to install nivida driver on linux. Some disagreed strongly with me. Then Ubuntu came around delivering on it, making it dead easy to install a number of proprietary drivers. Ten years later my view of the right balance has shifted significantly in the direction of "free-is-important". There are several reasons for my change of opinion, which can shortly be summarized- as follows:
        -easy installation of proprietary drivers (or apps) did nothing for the linux desktop (actually it only exposed us to risk by trusting the faith of the linux desktop into the hands of Canonical)
        -the real challenges of the linux desktop have little or nothing to do with how easy (or difficult) we make it for proprietary software. Debian simply leaves it to every vendor to package and distribute their stuff if it is proprietary, I believe that is sufficient.
        -Ten years later, what still gives me hope for the linux desktop is all those who valued the freedom, and what that brought (open graphics drivers that work, open wireless drivers almost across the board pioneered by Luis Rodriguez, pulseaudio clearing up the sound mess, systemd finally cleaning up the remaining plumming, fantastic suite of free productivity applications maturing, etc). But yes, I do acknowledge that Steam is an important part of making the linux desktop viable.

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        • #19
          Who are these people?

          I have a unique point of view on this. I am an Arch Linux TU and MATE developer. I am also the maintainer for MATE on Arch Linux and the maintainer for Ubuntu MATE Remix.

          None of the indivuals involved with Operating System U have approached Arch or MATE, nor contributed to either project, as far as I can tell. I'd also like to highlight that we (the MATE team) have not completed adding support for GTK3 to MATE, although that is a roadmap item due for completion in MATE 1.10 and a precursor to adding Wayland support.

          I can only imagine that the Operating System U team are about to submit some massive pull-requests to the MATE project what with the "CEO" proclaiming to be such an Open Source enthusiast. If Operating System U are to be taken seriously I'd like to see some proper community engagement first.

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          • #20
            I like how they make it sound like X11 was the No. 1 thing that kept Linux from being a good desktop OS.

            Yeah....

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            • #21
              Originally posted by TheSoulz View Post
              if people wanted something like windows why do they desire OSX?
              OSX is nothing like windows.
              Nobody wants OS X.

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              • #22
                Will it offer backwards compatibility for a reasonable time (say 7 years)? Or it will jeopardise my investments in proprietary software and my investments in hardware with proprietary drivers every time a new stable version/LTS comes out?

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                • #23
                  You can be pretty sure that it's going to be a flexible funding campaign. Even if they only manage to get 5K which isn't enough to do anything meaningful it will buy them a nice PC at least.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
                    You can be pretty sure that it's going to be a flexible funding campaign. Even if they only manage to get 5K which isn't enough to do anything meaningful it will buy them a nice PC at least.
                    Interesting go with kickstarter, unlike indiegogo kickstarter does not do flexible funding. This has no chance in hell.

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                    • #25
                      Re

                      Sounds like scam to me...
                      They can't even make a proper web site, the menu is buggy, that even a first year student at the university can do without any problems...

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                      • #26
                        I'm guessing this is a joke?


                        Hasn't Ubuntu been trying to do this for the last decade.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by johnc View Post
                          Nobody wants OS X.
                          Apple is having a hard time selling Macs

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                          • #28
                            If you want to release a commercial OS then you need to use well supported and proven technologies. MATE is definitely not that, Wayland is not that (yet).

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                              While I personally find Arch overall more user friendly in a maintenance perspective than most distros, I'd say it's harder than average as a whole. Regardless, these people have seriously unrealistic goals who have been using linux too long to not understand the stupidity of the average user.


                              That may be true, but to be fair, they made a lot of moves that people weren't happy with. Canonical acted like they were the authority over the linux community and they did things that hardware vendors find difficult to work with. Their end products are, from what I hear, pretty good for newcomers (who at least give it a shot). But, people hate change - if Canonical really wants to attract new users, they're either going to have to have an experience that closely resembles Windows or they're going to have to run ANY Windows program they want, both of which are incredibly stupid things but that's how you attract the herd. But, the problem is if something LOOKS like windows but doesn't run Windows programs, that changes people's expectations and therefore causes disappointment. This is why Windows RT failed - it looked like Windows, it was called Windows, but it couldn't run x86 programs. So in this perspective, an unfamiliar interface is the best thing to do. It's just a matter of how you prioritize familiarity.
                              You do not NEED to expect anything from something that ISN'T Windows. Canonical and Ubuntu are newcomers when it comes to the mainstream. People have expectations with regards to Windows because it has the Microsoft branding to it, Microsoft's own dominance will be its own downfall as when they NEED to change (Windows 8 and RT). People will react negatively, and it's all a matter of how many people will tolerate the amount of BS that happens with Microsoft. Microsoft doesn't change, people will switch over to iPads/Ubuntu/whatever and MS will die. Microsoft changes (Windows 8), people will hate them, BUT the mainstream will eventually have to tolerate Windows because it's just that, Windows, no matter how much it changes. However, looking at Windows RT, that was supposed to be the iPad killer and nobody bought it because everybody had the Windows expectation due to it having "Microsoft" branded all over it, they expected to do everything that they were familiar with regarding Windows on x86. I'm not worried about familiarity with the UI, I'm more concerned about the familiarity with the architectures. x86 is killing Microsoft's dominance. It's all about marketing, and Microsoft royally screwed up with Windows RT (almost 1 billion USD lost) but they really didn't have a choice as the ARM architecture is getting better every day and x86's days are numbered. Ubuntu has the interface in the bag, but they had BETTER get their phones released next month, it's only a matter of time before people begin tolerating Windows again.

                              As for newcomers, it's time for us Linux enthusiasts to promote Ubuntu that's aiming for the mainstream audience as much as we can. "It's a brand new experience, their Unity interface is amazingly good. I can't get enough of it."

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by scottishduck View Post
                                Apple is having a hard time selling Macs
                                OP was right. People want Macs, not OS X. If Apple shipped a themed version of Windows, instead of OSX, people would still buy Macbooks.

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