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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 Is Looking Fantastic

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  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 Is Looking Fantastic

    Phoronix: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 Is Looking Fantastic

    Since yesterday's public availability of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 release candidate I have been busy at Phoronix testing out this upcoming release of RHEL codenamed Maipo...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY3MDg

  • #2
    I agree, RHEL7 is looking really good. One of the downsides of the release getting delayed (Red Hat mentioned at their summit that they wanted this out at the end of last year), is that the software is a little older than usual (even for an enterprise release).

    Looking at qemu-kvm is quite amusing. Red Hat are the developers of KVM, and yet their yet to be released OS (RHEL7) is running qemu-kvm-1.53, whereas Ubuntu 14.04 is using qemu-kvm-2.0 (and is already out). What does that tell you ? The creators of the project are being cautious, while Ubuntu (who merely compiles someone else's work), is on bleeding edge.
    Food for thought.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SyXbiT View Post
      I agree, RHEL7 is looking really good. One of the downsides of the release getting delayed (Red Hat mentioned at their summit that they wanted this out at the end of last year), is that the software is a little older than usual (even for an enterprise release).

      Looking at qemu-kvm is quite amusing. Red Hat are the developers of KVM, and yet their yet to be released OS (RHEL7) is running qemu-kvm-1.53, whereas Ubuntu 14.04 is using qemu-kvm-2.0 (and is already out). What does that tell you ? The creators of the project are being cautious, while Ubuntu (who merely compiles someone else's work), is on bleeding edge.
      Food for thought.
      A lot will hopefully get bumped by RHEL 7.1

      Comment


      • #4
        Like Debian, being conservative on software versions, even the parts they ar the most aware of, is an indicator of the stability they are targetting. It also ensures a better upgrade process for companies that extensively use it, with potentially less quirks to workaround. And also, using a too recent qemu-kvm with an "old" kernel is not necesarily the best choice to get the best of that kernel.

        Anyway, it seems real good, when it's out, and CentOS follows, the Red Hat world could make the debianists jealous and want Jessie more and more.

        Comment


        • #5
          Personally I loathe Gnome 3. However I think it is sad that even RedHat does not use their ui "innovations", activities screen, no taskbar, no minimize, no shutdown, etc. Keep up the good work guys.

          Comment


          • #6
            I bet you can always get those things back if you want/need fany in your environments. Don't forget the first target : professionnal world, even in the "traditional" industry sector. You need to propose a product as clean as functional. Also, as the lower task bar is hinting, you have to assure user experience is not broken with existing user base.

            I'm not fond at all about Gnome 3 at all (I'm using KDE on Manjaro Linux), but in the goal of coherent, and rather soft user interface, it does the job. I'm not planning to switch from my current setup, but i'll definitely give it a try in the coming days, to see the progress made.

            Comment


            • #7
              Red Hat looks ok... I've never seen any distro looking 'Fantastic'. Windows and IOS are looking fantastic, Linux distro's not that much... not that I care for that.

              English is not my first (or second) language, but reading that someone is 'satisfied' normally tells me someone is satisfied with the results of his work. For as far as I know this was not te case here?

              "Overall, I'm very satisfied with how it's turned out".

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by zoomblab View Post
                Personally I loathe Gnome 3. However I think it is sad that even RedHat does not use their ui "innovations", activities screen, no taskbar, no minimize, no shutdown, etc. Keep up the good work guys.
                ... You can't possibly compare corporate server and workstation users (RHEL's target user) to desktop users (GNOME shell target user).
                Hence GNOME 3's split personally: Shell and classic.

                Personally, I dislike them both (KDE), but that's irrelevant for discussion at hand.

                - Gilboa
                DEV: Intel S2600C0, 2xE52658V2, 32GB, 4x2TB + 2x3TB, GTX780, F21/x86_64, Dell U2711.
                SRV: Intel S5520SC, 2xX5680, 36GB, 4x2TB, GTX550, F21/x86_64, Dell U2412..
                BACK: Tyan Tempest i5400XT, 2xE5335, 8GB, 3x1.5TB, 9800GTX, F21/x86-64.
                LAP: ASUS N56VJ, i7-3630QM, 16GB, 1TB, 635M, F21/x86_64.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by zoomblab View Post
                  Personally I loathe Gnome 3. However I think it is sad that even RedHat does not use their ui "innovations", activities screen, no taskbar, no minimize, no shutdown, etc. Keep up the good work guys.
                  In other words... they're reserving their *usable* version of gnome3 to enterprise users. I'd like to see this available in Fedora.... especially by DEFAULT. Might make a default Fedora install *actually usable*.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SyXbiT View Post
                    I agree, RHEL7 is looking really good. One of the downsides of the release getting delayed (Red Hat mentioned at their summit that they wanted this out at the end of last year), is that the software is a little older than usual (even for an enterprise release).

                    Looking at qemu-kvm is quite amusing. Red Hat are the developers of KVM, and yet their yet to be released OS (RHEL7) is running qemu-kvm-1.53, whereas Ubuntu 14.04 is using qemu-kvm-2.0 (and is already out). What does that tell you ? The creators of the project are being cautious, while Ubuntu (who merely compiles someone else's work), is on bleeding edge.
                    Food for thought.
                    qemu 2.0 seems to be targeted for inclusion in Fedora 21 and EL7.1.
                    Also EPEL7... which would mean that EL7 can get it by a simple "yum --enablerepo=epel [install|update] qemu-kvm"
                    ** what this means is that if you want to ride the bleeding edge, you can, and its there for you.
                    http://koji.fedoraproject.org/koji/p...packageID=3685
                    Last edited by droidhacker; 04-23-2014, 08:58 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Fantastic?

                      In which part looks fantastic? In comparison to Fedora has fewer packages, older programs, higher price, has small community, worse hardware support, on desktop has worse support from 3rd party (Chrome, Skype supports Fedora, not RHEL). Only good part is really long support. And this is good only for servers.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                        In other words... they're reserving their *usable* version of gnome3 to enterprise users. I'd like to see this available in Fedora.... especially by DEFAULT. Might make a default Fedora install *actually usable*.
                        Noone is reserving anything. It is a more conservative choice for a conservative distribution. It was available in GNOME upstream and in Fedora before it was included in RHEL. You can use it if you want to.

                        https://ask.fedoraproject.org/en/que...ic-by-default/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Leinad View Post
                          In which part looks fantastic? In comparison to Fedora has fewer packages, older programs, higher price, has small community, worse hardware support, on desktop has worse support from 3rd party (Chrome, Skype supports Fedora, not RHEL). Only good part is really long support. And this is good only for servers.
                          Unsuprisingly, the parts you mention as RHEL being good for is precisely the market RHEL is primarily designed for. Long term support (including workstations etc) and servers.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Leinad View Post
                            In which part looks fantastic? In comparison to Fedora has fewer packages, older programs, higher price, has small community, worse hardware support, on desktop has worse support from 3rd party (Chrome, Skype supports Fedora, not RHEL). Only good part is really long support. And this is good only for servers.
                            But rock solid stability. (I know I'd never use Fedora for a mission critical production server)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                              qemu 2.0 seems to be targeted for inclusion in Fedora 21 and EL7.1.
                              Also EPEL7... which would mean that EL7 can get it by a simple "yum --enablerepo=epel [install|update] qemu-kvm"
                              ** what this means is that if you want to ride the bleeding edge, you can, and its there for you.
                              http://koji.fedoraproject.org/koji/p...packageID=3685
                              It will arrive in RHEL 7.1, but it won't be in EPEL.
                              EPEL is only for packages that aren't in EL, not for newer versions of existing packages.

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