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Ubuntu Systemd Plans: Will Be Default By Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Spittie View Post
    They're waiting for Debian to do the job, so that they can copy/paste it
    Not surprising, Canonical takes forever to do anything that someone else hasn't already done for them. And even then, they take ages to finish anything. So glad I don't use Ubuntu, or any distro based on it

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    • #12
      Originally posted by carewolf View Post
      With this and the Mir story, I guess 16.04 is the new Ubuntu pie in the sky? The date they put on anything they don't know when they can have finished?
      All it really means is "It's not going to be in 14.04". 16.04 is the next LTS release, so that's the next "important" release. They're not overly concerned about what goes into the interim releases.

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      • #13
        Will SystemD on Ubuntu increase the boot time?

        I know Lenovo has resorted to using an UpStart like system where process loading is delayed until booted. Anybody know if SystemD will result in longer boot times on Ubuntu 16.04?

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        • #14
          systemd achieved 2-second boot times two years ago. Is that fast enough for you?

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Skrapion View Post
            systemd achieved 2-second boot times two years ago. Is that fast enough for you?
            Well it all depends what boot time UpStart has in comparison.

            My personal experience with boot times is that systems that delay processes boot a lot faster than those that try to run everything at once. So I was curious if this is true for SystemD. Maybe it isn't. This is what I was wondering.

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            • #16
              Yes, it's true for systemd too. Actually, systemd is much better at that sort of functionality. It's not limited to task-level dependencies like Upstart is; it can launch a service when, for instance, a file is created, or a socket is opened. In addition to ensuring that everything the service needs actually exists at launch time, it also allows you to do some neat things with late launching. For instance, you can set it up so that sshd isn't constantly running, but instead only runs when somebody connects to the external socket.

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              • #17
                Regarding systemd migration sequence and timing... anyone remember how did Arch do it? I didn't have an Arch system built during the switch, so I wasn't able to witness it. But I don't think it took all that long.

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