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GRUB 2.02 Has Many Features, Might Hit Ubuntu 14.04

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  • GRUB 2.02 Has Many Features, Might Hit Ubuntu 14.04

    Phoronix: GRUB 2.02 Has Many Features, Might Hit Ubuntu 14.04

    Development of GRUB 2.02 has been going well for well over one year and at least some Canonical developers are hoping to land the Free Software Foundation's updated boot-loader into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS even if it means using a development version for the time being...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU3NDk

  • #2
    Is grub2 bloated or is it a myth?

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    • #3
      Grub is like a mini os, it has filesystem drivers like the Linux kernel and lots of other features. Interestingly when you use UEFI you can use much simpler bootloaders (or even none) as long as you store the kernel (+initrd if needed) into the efi fat partition. If you don't like that you of course need bootloaders which can access the filesystem to load the kernel or whatever. The grub config files support a scripting language similar to shell scripts, you can dynamically create menu entries, very interesting features...

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      • #4
        I moved some time ago to syslinux - much simpler - just KISS, like the grub 1.

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        • #5
          needs moar f2fs

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mark45 View Post
            Is grub2 bloated or is it a myth?
            I won't say its bloated, but it is definitely complex and convoluted compared to Grub1 or syslinux

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            • #7
              I used to really hate Grub2, but I've learned to just make sure the grub autoconfig never happens (e.g. don't install kernel updates from distro repos... I always build my own anyway) and just stick to manual edits. I usually have to manually correct things anyway when grub-mkconfig gets run.

              I've recently installed Mint on /dev/sda (where an old Gentoo install used to be) for a good distro to play with Steam. I was planning on installing LILO to fix that (which I prefer because it's simple, filesystem agnostic and has no choice but to work AND I'm stubborn) but I decided not to fight it. Really Grub is better for me anyway, because when I do a new kernel in my Slackware setup I don't have to reboot to the other OS or chroot to run the lilo command. I only need to change a few characters in grub.cfg.

              I don't like change.

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              • #8
                One of the interesting issues with GRUB is that if you boot into Windows (from GRUB) you can't run the Windows Backup program.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Grogan View Post
                  I've recently installed Mint on /dev/sda (where an old Gentoo install used to be) for a good distro to play with Steam.
                  How is steam on linux? Good experience?

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                  • #10
                    hmm the uboot functionality intrigues me, but I'm not entirely sure how that works. Does that mean you need a uEnv to boot to grub, or, are you able to completely place grub over uboot? Because I would love to get rid of uboot - it is so poorly documented and inconsistent.

                    ARM in general needs a serious overhaul in the booting department. It's an inconvenient mess.

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                    • #11
                      I always knew GRUB was the "everything including the kitchen sink" bootloader, but even with that in mind, I boggled at this entry in the changelog:

                      Code:
                      * Morse code output using system speaker
                      I imagine it's so it can communicate if video fails to come up, but I still don't know whether to be impressed or horrified!

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                      • #12
                        When will Ubuntu fork GRUB2?Before or after forking the kernel?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                          hmm the uboot functionality intrigues me, but I'm not entirely sure how that works. Does that mean you need a uEnv to boot to grub, or, are you able to completely place grub over uboot? Because I would love to get rid of uboot - it is so poorly documented and inconsistent.

                          ARM in general needs a serious overhaul in the booting department. It's an inconvenient mess.
                          It chainloads grub from u-boot, doesn't replace it. This means you can pretend like u-boot isn't there at the cost of some boot delay, and gain the flexibility of grub.

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                          • #14
                            @Grogan

                            If you manually need to edit your grub.cfg then you do something completely wrong. When you come from grub 1 then you would have noticed that it was a custom script in Debian based systems called update-grub that modified the menu.lst file in a post install trigger. This is now STANDARD, the script name is there on Debian but it just calls:
                            Code:
                            grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg
                            This triggers the execution of all scripts you find in /etc/grub.d, if you want manual entries you have got 2 simple positions, the old way was adding a file in /etc/grub.d (must be +x) or append to /etc/grub.d/40_custom, this required the execution of the command mentioned before. A bit later a file called /etc/grub.d/41_custom was added, that simply souces custom.cfg in the same dir as you find the grub.cfg. As this is dynamically done you can just modifiy the custom.cfg and it will be used. Another project that was first used on Debian is called os-prober, it is used to find other OS installs. Right now grub 2 ships already the os-prober hooks in /etc/grub.d and as soon as you install the tool you see other OSs in the list as well. In the case you dislike that uninstall os-prober or -x the /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober and you are done. If you want that your custom commands are shown first rename the files, 09-xxxx would be in front of default Linux entries. I don't get what your problem is... Btw. if you manually compile kernels on Debian (or RPM) systems there are nice targets to use like:
                            Code:
                            make INSTALL_MOD_STRIP=1 deb-pkg

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
                              When will Ubuntu fork GRUB2?Before or after forking the kernel?
                              When the GNOME people take it over and decide that it's too "cluttered" and begin ripping out features.

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