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Fedora's Yum Replacement Ready For User Testing

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  • Fedora's Yum Replacement Ready For User Testing

    Phoronix: Fedora's Yum Replacement Ready For User Testing

    DNF, the next-generation yum package manager spearheaded by the Fedora project, is now ready for end-user testing ahead of its expected use out-of-the-box by Fedora 22...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU1ODU

  • #2
    Question is, is DNF an in place replacement?
    Eg. if I run "yum install" is it yum or dnf?

    If not, I imagine quite a lot of people will have to rewrite their scripts
    and learn to use a new tool.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mark45 View Post
      Question is, is DNF an in place replacement?
      Eg. if I run "yum install" is it yum or dnf?

      If not, I imagine quite a lot of people will have to rewrite their scripts
      and learn to use a new tool.
      dnf will become the new yum when it is ready. The command line and the output are also almost identical.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mark45 View Post
        Question is, is DNF an in place replacement?
        Eg. if I run "yum install" is it yum or dnf?

        If not, I imagine quite a lot of people will have to rewrite their scripts
        and learn to use a new tool.
        As long as the only difference is the program's name, that shouldn't be the case. A symlink or an alias would solve it without bothering reviewing the scripts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mrugiero View Post
          As long as the only difference is the program's name, that shouldn't be the case. A symlink or an alias would solve it without bothering reviewing the scripts.
          Afaik it is not a "in place replacement".

          http://akozumpl.github.io/dnf/cli_vs_yum.html :
          DNF drops Yum?s protected_packages configuration option. Generally, DNF lets the user do what she specified, even have DNF itself removed.
          Yes, you can remove dnf or even the kernel.

          PS:
          You are free to write a plugin to fix this (provide yum like behavior) though.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by log0 View Post
            Afaik it is not a "in place replacement".

            http://akozumpl.github.io/dnf/cli_vs_yum.html :

            Yes, you can remove dnf or even the kernel.

            PS:
            You are free to write a plugin to fix this (provide yum like behavior) though.
            While I don't necessarily agree or disagree that you should not be able to remove dnf itself or the kernel... One of the devs make a valid point on the mailing list in rebuttal: If they're installing packages they already have root. If they already have root then there's also no protection against them accidentally doing rm -rf /boot or /usr or /etc or /bin or even more hilariously...

            sudo rm -rf ~ /bin

            (note the space), that would probably wipe out their entire home directory AND /bin, which depending on rm's code might either just wipe out the symlink, or it might follow the symlink and rip its way through /usr/bin/.

            The point being: if you've got root you have the ability to screw shit up, same old story as ever.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by log0 View Post
              Yes, you can remove dnf or even the kernel.
              APT lets you do the same, IIRC.
              Anyway, I don't use Fedora, it was just a guess and a suggestion.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                While I don't necessarily agree or disagree that you should not be able to remove dnf itself or the kernel... One of the devs make a valid point on the mailing list in rebuttal: If they're installing packages they already have root. If they already have root then there's also no protection against them accidentally doing rm -rf /boot or /usr or /etc or /bin or even more hilariously...

                sudo rm -rf ~ /bin

                (note the space), that would probably wipe out their entire home directory AND /bin, which depending on rm's code might either just wipe out the symlink, or it might follow the symlink and rip its way through /usr/bin/.

                The point being: if you've got root you have the ability to screw shit up, same old story as ever.
                The point is that dnf is different compared to yum in this (let's say critical) area...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by log0 View Post
                  The point is that dnf is different compared to yum in this (let's say critical) area...
                  True, but the mailing list posters seemed to be more annoyed that this 'protection' was gone, rather than that it was different than yum-- which is what I was trying to get at

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post
                    dnf will become the new yum when it is ready. The command line and the output are also almost identical.
                    Perfect. I prefer yum due to its superior and clear CLI, so I don't really care what runs under the hood.

                    Comment

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