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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta Released

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  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta Released

    Phoronix: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta Released

    Red Hat has delivered an early Christmas present for enterprise Linux users out there... Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta 1 is now available!..

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU0MDk

  • #2
    Classic mode

    Hope to see GNOME classic mode work great.

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    • #3
      I was hopping for the 3.12 kernel with the new schedule algorithm and much improved radeon performance.. (I use scientific linux in my desktop)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tessio View Post
        I was hopping for the 3.12 kernel with the new schedule algorithm and much improved radeon performance.. (I use scientific linux in my desktop)
        I'm actually more surprised they didn't go for 3.13 o.O I realize its the bleeding edge but I would think enterprise with hundreds of cores would be drooling over the new IO code to run against as many cores as needed

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        • #5
          it doesn't work

          Hi all,

          I've just downloaded the beta version,
          but it doesn't work on either VirtualBox or VMware Player (latest versions of both!)
          hope to test-drive it ASAP!

          cheers,

          Luca

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          • #6
            I am surprised that there is no 32-bit x86 support. I know this is anecdotal evidence at best, but I seed Debian and OpenSUSE torrents, and 32-bit looks to be more popular than 64-bit with Debian downloaders and almost as popular as 64-bit with OpenSUSE downloaders.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ericg View Post
              I'm actually more surprised they didn't go for 3.13 o.O I realize its the bleeding edge but I would think enterprise with hundreds of cores would be drooling over the new IO code to run against as many cores as needed
              Ath it looks like it has performance regresions, so probably whise to wait a bit. All in all RHEL7 looks like a good upgrade though.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by AJenbo View Post
                Ath it looks like it has performance regresions, so probably whise to wait a bit. All in all RHEL7 looks like a good upgrade though.
                No I know that there's regressions at the moment, but im (perhaps, optimistically) assuming that those are just generic bugs and not something along the lines of "We screwed up the design, this isn't gonna work like we thought it would..".

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                • #9
                  I think with a thing like RHEL you want to wait untill the dust seatels with somthing like that.

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                  • #10
                    They are using the Fedora 19 anaconda installer too? I installed Fedora 19 two days ago and the installer was awful!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Serge View Post
                      I am surprised that there is no 32-bit x86 support. I know this is anecdotal evidence at best, but I seed Debian and OpenSUSE torrents, and 32-bit looks to be more popular than 64-bit with Debian downloaders and almost as popular as 64-bit with OpenSUSE downloaders.
                      Well, several community distributions already default to 64 bit versions but even otherwise, the enterprise linux market is very different. If you want to use things like virtualization or high end databases etc on a large number of systems, you want 64-bit anyway and it takes several years after a new release of RHEL for customers to seriously deploy it. If you are conservative on hardware architecture, you will likely stick with an older version. Most of the customers I expect would be still quite happy with RHEL 5 and even EL4. The subscription model of Red Hat is not based on selling new versions since subscriptions are not tied to any particular version (ie) RHEL 7 will be a free upgrade to existing customers and they can choose whatever supported version they want.

                      @Eric, Updating to a new upstream version even around the beta cycle stage is very expensive because of how QA and certifications processes are affected by such a change. Red Hat typically cherry picks hundreds of changes from newer versions anyway so the baseline version is often pretty misleading.

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                      • #12
                        What a hell? There is no open Beta? I remember when RHEL6 beta came out, they gave access to the beta to non-subscribers. Now nothing.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gnufreex View Post
                          What a hell? There is no open Beta? I remember when RHEL6 beta came out, they gave access to the beta to non-subscribers. Now nothing.
                          http://ftp.redhat.com/redhat/rhel/beta/7/x86_64/iso/

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                          • #14
                            Thanks, downloading now.

                            I have at first followed a link on that press release, and it required subscription.

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                            • #15
                              "Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta 1 is based upon the Fedora 19 package set and the upstream Linux 3.10 kernel"

                              I think that it's actually based on Fedora 18. There are many changes from F19.

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