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gNewSense 3.0 Switches From Ubuntu To Debian

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  • gNewSense 3.0 Switches From Ubuntu To Debian

    Phoronix: gNewSense 3.0 Switches From Ubuntu To Debian

    For those concerned more about code licenses and the free nature of software over the quality, richness, and features of a Linux distribution, gNewSense 3.0 is now available. The gNewSense 3.0 release now supports three architectures and has switched from an Ubuntu base to now using Debain Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQzMTE

  • #2
    Am I the only one who thinks "gNewSense" sounds like "nuisance"?

    Anyway, good move on their part. Switching to Debian should make their work a little easier, since they follow the DFSG.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by chenxiaolong View Post
      Am I the only one who thinks "gNewSense" sounds like "nuisance"?

      Anyway, good move on their part. Switching to Debian should make their work a little easier, since they follow the DFSG.
      I always thought the resemblance to "nuisance" was intentional.

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      • #4
        For those concerned more about code licenses and the free nature of software over the quality, richness, and features of a Linux distribution, gNewSense 3.0 is now available.
        Sums up FOSS ideals pretty well.

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        • #5
          it's Lemote YeeloOng

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by phoronix View Post
            For those concerned more about code licenses and the free nature of software over actually being able to use their computer.
            There, fixed.

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            • #7
              Thanks for making news of this, and very much thank you for writing a neutral and objective article. Will install gNewSense on my laptop, and everything just works, and more, there is nothing I need to install out of the repos.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by moilami View Post
                Thanks for making news of this, and very much thank you for writing a neutral and objective article. Will install gNewSense on my laptop, and everything just works, and more, there is nothing I need to install out of the repos.
                Let me know how that goes considering gnewsense has almost zero support for any type of wifi chips due to not having binary firmware blobs.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by peppercats View Post
                  Let me know how that goes considering gnewsense has almost zero support for any type of wifi chips due to not having binary firmware blobs.
                  Everything just works except 3D-acceleration, which I don't need. It does not have Wi-Fi. The laptop is about more than 10 years old and serves me as an emergency backup laptop.

                  I had another laptop with working Wi-Fi and 3D acceleration. It had NVIDIA graphics, but I don't remember what Wi-Fi chip it had. Unfortunately I don't have it anymore.

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                  • #10
                    I never understood their reasoning to not accept closed firmware.

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                    • #11
                      nice distro

                      First off I invite everyone to ignore BO$$.

                      Anyhow,

                      Switching to Debian base seems to be the right move. Debian is already fully free with the exception of the non-free optional repositories. Also since Debian has a long release cycle and thus more well tested. For this, gnewsense should be more rock solid than before (I think) in terms of stability.

                      One thing IMO: I do not like the name Gnewsense. It sounds weird.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by toguro123
                        In case you didnt know more than 80% of a GNU/Linux system was written by the free software foundation (RMS and minions). The GNU C library, most of all console commands, GCC compiler, etc were written by the FSF. You also seem to be ignorant about what Linux actually is: the kernel of the system.
                        Actually, I've heard that's not accurate. It's quite true that Linux relies upon GNU for some very important utilities, but really GNU wrote only a very small percentage of the code in a modern Linux distro; as of 2011 or so, GNU only wrote around 8% of Ubuntu's code -- an important 8%, but 8% nonetheless. Furthermore, the Linux kernel alone is 9%, larger than GNU's total contribution to modern Ubuntu.

                        http://pedrocr.pt/text/how-much-gnu-in-gnu-linux/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kite View Post
                          Actually, I've heard that's not accurate. It's quite true that Linux relies upon GNU for some very important utilities, but really GNU wrote only a very small percentage of the code in a modern Linux distro; as of 2011 or so, GNU only wrote around 8% of Ubuntu's code -- an important 8%, but 8% nonetheless. Furthermore, the Linux kernel alone is 9%, larger than GNU's total contribution to modern Ubuntu.

                          http://pedrocr.pt/text/how-much-gnu-in-gnu-linux/
                          GNU has written a lot more (A LOT A LOT) software than what is included in ubuntu. The point is not the number, but that without the GNU packages the system would not be usable.

                          I know what you mean and you know what I mean so it does not really matter. :-)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kite View Post
                            Actually, I've heard that's not accurate. It's quite true that Linux relies upon GNU for some very important utilities, but really GNU wrote only a very small percentage of the code in a modern Linux distro; as of 2011 or so, GNU only wrote around 8% of Ubuntu's code -- an important 8%, but 8% nonetheless. Furthermore, the Linux kernel alone is 9%, larger than GNU's total contribution to modern Ubuntu.

                            http://pedrocr.pt/text/how-much-gnu-in-gnu-linux/
                            I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you’re referring to as GNU/Linux, is in fact, KDE/GNU/Linux, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, KDE plus GNU plus Linux. GNU/Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning KDE desktop environment made useful by the KDE desktop, KDE windowing system and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kite View Post
                              Actually, I've heard that's not accurate. It's quite true that Linux relies upon GNU for some very important utilities, but really GNU wrote only a very small percentage of the code in a modern Linux distro; as of 2011 or so, GNU only wrote around 8% of Ubuntu's code -- an important 8%, but 8% nonetheless. Furthermore, the Linux kernel alone is 9%, larger than GNU's total contribution to modern Ubuntu.

                              http://pedrocr.pt/text/how-much-gnu-in-gnu-linux/
                              GNU has produced a lot more software than what is included in Ubuntu. In any case, the actual number does not matter. These systems are unusable without the GNU packages. That is the point, not the actual percentage of code included with 16 digits of accuracy.

                              I know what you mean and you know what I mean so it really does not matter. :-)

                              Comment

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