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Preview: Ubuntu's Performance Over The Past Two Years

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  • Preview: Ubuntu's Performance Over The Past Two Years

    Phoronix: Preview: Ubuntu's Performance Over The Past Two Years

    Our latest look at the current development state of Ubuntu 13.10 is comparing the "Saucy Salamander" performance against that of Ubuntu 13.04, 12.10, 12.04.2 LTS, and 11.10. Testing was done with an Intel Sandy Bridge system to see how the Ubuntu Linux performance has evolved over the past two years in the road to the October release of Ubuntu 13.10.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=18912

  • #2
    Weird result for Lammps, according to previous benchmarks there should be little difference between GCC 4.7 and 4.8 http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...competes&num=2

    Same for Lavamd. http://openbenchmarking.org/prospect...5a1d98daedbbb7

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    • #3
      ffmpeg

      Anyone knows why ffmpeg got so much faster in 13.10? Thanks!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
        Is it just me or after the latest kernel update Ubuntu's fans spin at a lower rate? Did they merge the patch from 3.11 in 13.04?
        Radeon DPM was merged in 3.11, so if you're using radeon, that's probably normal. That is, if you use radeon.

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        • #5
          Gentoo

          And now compare it with Gentoo ...

          Ubuntu may have become faster, but it is still horrible bloatware.

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          • #6
            Trolling as usual

            Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
            Nobody with a life uses it and you know it. Nobody spends time compiling their own shit. Canonical got this. Now it's time for you to get it. And leave the basement. We want things to work out of the box without doing anything.
            BO$$, nice to see you again!

            Gentoo is a mixed bag for most people, but I freaking love it. It sure takes a lot of time to get used to, but when you are, for instance, a scientist, developer or server-administrator, being flexible and performance is the priority.
            Portage is awesome and way more advanced than aptitude. Using Debian once in a while, I feel like being set back _years_.

            Compiling your own stuff is also debatable, as it depends on what you do with the given potential. I know that excessive CFLAGS (-Ofast ...) don't bring much and make the program really unstable. What it's about is the fact that you have USE-flags to only compile your software with features you need. This effectively allows you to strip down your system, make your programs faster and reducing memory-usage (as less shared libraries are loaded).

            Once you have set up your Gentoo-system, it will be the bomb and work for you just like you want it to be. I am not unrealistic to say that Gentoo is for everybody. If you don't understand it or are incapable of reading the great manuals, then I can't help you, but I won't accuse you for using the bloatware Ubuntu. I don't want to push this discussion here too far, either, as I was speaking of performance and not user-friendliness.
            No one can debate that Gentoo is faster, and it's not about excessive compiler-flags and the like. It's more about what software is installed and how many dependencies it pulls in.

            I like your analogy of "getting out of the basement".
            Frankly, the question to ask is, who really is residing in a basement: The troll, who has nothing better to do than writing useless posts, or the experienced Gentoo user, who knows his way around GNU/Linux.


            I'll leave the answer to you, BO$$.
            Last edited by frign; 07-12-2013, 10:47 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
              Nobody with a life uses it and you know it. Nobody spends time compiling their own shit. Canonical got this. Now it's time for you to get it. And leave the basement. We want things to work out of the box without doing anything.
              You can use Ubuntu if you don't mind Canonical will include any malware from Debian and most software is outdated because of no rolling updates.
              http://research.swtch.com/openssl
              Last edited by JS987; 07-12-2013, 11:21 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by frign View Post
                No one can debate that Gentoo is faster, and it's not about excessive compiler-flags and the like. It's more about what software is installed and how many dependencies it pulls in.
                If the point is deciding which software to install, I think it's simpler to use Arch. Except you actually mean what features your software builds, in that case, the easier it's to build your own, the better, and I agree you should go with Gentoo.

                Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
                The questions isn't whether you love it or not but whether people could use it without any training. And the answer is that it can't. So it has no way to get a better market share. So it won't get love from companies and won't be taken seriously. So it will basically always remain where it is, limited in its use. Thus it's only a joke used by people who want to feel 'different' or 'superior'. Devs, scientists etc. can use Ubuntu just fine. Google uses Ubuntu so it's possible even for big companies to use it. Gentoo is already getting left behind and will be dead. In fact it's already dead if not counting you and the other two guys that use it.

                Nobody cares about improving Gentoo when you can improve Ubuntu which has a better chance of getting visible. So the only ones working on Gentoo are people who either have no life or just like to tinker with their stuff instead of doing work => again people with no life. You just like to think Gentoo is better because it allows you to waste time while thinking you're working faster. You think that compiling your own stuff will end up substantially better than the stuff that comes with Ubuntu, but that is just that, a belief. In reality Ubuntu is pretty much the same but works out of the box, thus you don't need to tinker with it. Thus you hate it because it forces you to actually do something useful instead of messing with makefiles.

                And you'll think I'm trolling because the truth just hit you in the face.
                I agree that Ubuntu is usable for scientists and such, but if you think building anything actually requires messing with makefiles, you have no idea what you talk about; the makefiles are there just for you to not need to do anything but run ./configure (with options if you want to choose what to build) and make to have it built; three commands, counting the install, I hope that doesn't kill your productivity, bro. Also, even while building all of your system locally is a waste of time, building some critical packages your own can really improve things.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by frign View Post
                  And now compare it with Gentoo ...

                  Ubuntu may have become faster, but it is still horrible bloatware.
                  And then compare it with Ubuntu. Gentoo may be faster, but it is still a horrible desktop for any end-user. So?

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                  • #10
                    You still don't understand it

                    Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
                    The questions isn't whether you love it or not but whether people could use it without any training. And the answer is that it can't. So it has no way to get a better market share. So it won't get love from companies and won't be taken seriously. So it will basically always remain where it is, limited in its use. Thus it's only a joke used by people who want to feel 'different' or 'superior'. Devs, scientists etc. can use Ubuntu just fine. Google uses Ubuntu so it's possible even for big companies to use it. Gentoo is already getting left behind and will be dead. In fact it's already dead if not counting you and the other two guys that use it.

                    Nobody cares about improving Gentoo when you can improve Ubuntu which has a better chance of getting visible. So the only ones working on Gentoo are people who either have no life or just like to tinker with their stuff instead of doing work => again people with no life. You just like to think Gentoo is better because it allows you to waste time while thinking you're working faster. You think that compiling your own stuff will end up substantially better than the stuff that comes with Ubuntu, but that is just that, a belief. In reality Ubuntu is pretty much the same but works out of the box, thus you don't need to tinker with it. Thus you hate it because it forces you to actually do something useful instead of messing with makefiles.

                    And you'll think I'm trolling because the truth just hit you in the face.
                    It hit me in the face that you have no knowledge about the topic you are talking about.

                    Again, I am not talking about popularity and I didn't say you could use Gentoo without proper preparation and using the manuals provided.
                    mrugiero gave a good answer, so there is no need for me to explain it to you again.

                    The point is flexibility: Once you need your computer to do more advanced stuff, distributions like Ubuntu can get in your way. When you don't know what I'm talking about, you won't understand it.

                    If your horizon can't reach further than the Ubuntu Software Center, you don't qualify to have a discussion with me or any other advanced GNU/Linux-developer.

                    My Gentoo-setup boots up in less than 3 seconds and is fully functional. Show me you can do that with Ubuntu and we can talk again.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
                      Outdated software on Ubuntu? Means Red Hat Enterprise Linux must be for idiots then. Or maybe people like stability a little more than using nightbuilds hmmm??
                      If new stable version of software is released after new Ubuntu release, you can wait up to 6 months or you have to create own deb package which is hard or impossible because of dependencies.
                      Red Hat is used by companies which don't mind outdated software. Many of them still use Windows XP.

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                      • #12
                        Arch is fine!

                        Originally posted by mrugiero View Post
                        If the point is deciding which software to install, I think it's simpler to use Arch. Except you actually mean what features your software builds, in that case, the easier it's to build your own, the better, and I agree you should go with Gentoo.
                        Sorry, I might not have been clear enough. I was talking about USE-flags and that is only achievable by recompiling the software and actually remove the dynlib-dependency in the binary itself. So I agree with your points. Arch is a _fine distribution_ and I like how they handle meta-packages, but if you want to go the full way (like I do with my Gentoo-system) and iron everything out you don't need, then even Arch unfortunately sets limits.

                        With Gentoo, I have fun tinkering around with the Kernel and stripping unneeded use-flags. It turns out, that the less you pull in and use, the less ways there are to break your system and it is effectively more reliable and snappier.
                        Of course, you have to edit config-files and the like, but once you've set everything up in the first place, you can use your system for _years_ without problems.

                        I want to make clear, though, that Gentoo is of course not for everyone. I don't know why, but we got kind of used to reinstalling our operating systems every year or less. Setting up a "normal" distro is easy and fast, but you got to live with problems which might occur while updating or changing a setting or even installing new software.
                        Knowing what you've set up manually in the first place helps you understand the system and, in the long run, allows you to fix problems easily, saving time.

                        There is no perfect distribution. If you want to be flexible, you have to invest time and read manuals . If you want to set-up things quickly, Arch is one good way to go.
                        Last edited by frign; 07-12-2013, 01:06 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
                          Well 13.04 uses 3.8 so if they backported than yay. Go Canonical! They understand what is important for the user and execute fast and efficient! That's why they are number one.
                          It's not even enabled by default in 3.11 because it's still untested. There's no way Canonical backported and enabled by default. Sounds like the placebo effect going on.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                            It's not even enabled by default in 3.11 because it's still untested. There's no way Canonical backported and enabled by default. Sounds like the placebo effect going on.
                            Maybe he smoked some of Shuttleworths chest hair.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
                              Nobody with a life uses it and you know it. Nobody spends time compiling their own shit. Canonical got this. Now it's time for you to get it. And leave the basement. We want things to work out of the box without doing anything.
                              To be honest, +1, I use Xubuntu myself which tends to be the best compromise (no distro being perfect).

                              It's not worth spending hours making your system from nothing (have fun reinstalling) and even less compiling.

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