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  • #31
    Originally posted by bwat47 View Post
    I'd rather sit on a pile of thumbtacks than dual boot anyway
    I'd love to get rid of dual boot, unfortunately linux is lacking in some application areas.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by deanjo View Post
      I'd love to get rid of dual boot, unfortunately linux is lacking in some application areas.
      Virtual machines are better for most purposes these days.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post
        Virtual machines are better for most purposes these days.
        Last I checked you can't use a Windows virtual machine to make Linux magically support an 802.11ac wireless device. Even though 802.11ac is already in Draft 5.0 and is becoming mainstream for Windows not a single Linux driver exists.
        Last edited by Sonadow; 05-21-2013, 04:01 AM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
          Last I checked you can't use a Windows virtual machine to make Linux magically support an 802.11ac wireless device. Even though 802.11ac is already in Draft 5.0 and is becoming mainstream for Windows not a single Linux driver exists.
          What part of "most" did you have trouble understanding? The idea that no Linux driver exists doesn't seem to be true. There certainly is some drivers out there but sure, it could get better. If you have really have hardware that is unsupported in Linux and only in Windows, you can still use a virtual machine, you just have to use Windows as the host.
          Last edited by RahulSundaram; 05-21-2013, 04:25 AM.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post
            What part of "most" did you have trouble understanding? The idea that no Linux driver exists doesn't seem to be true. There certainly is some drivers out there but sure, it could get better. If you have really have hardware that is unsupported in Linux and only in Windows, you can still use a virtual machine, you just have to use Windows as the host.
            I made that topic you linked to, and I own an 802.11ac device, so I belive that I am quite certain that I know what I am talking about.

            If you want greater proof, head down to http://wikidevi.com/wiki/List_of_802.11ac_Hardware and skim through every single adapter available that has been released on the market (it starts at about 1/3 into the page). Every one of them, when clicked, takes you to a page that describes the hardware, and the table has a row that says 'Linux driver: None'. Even the Realtek-based and Mediatek-based (previously Ralink) ones have no downloadable driver, and those chipsets are already being mass produced. And Realtek and Ralink are companies who are known to provide driver sources in tarballs to support their hardware in linux. ANd let's not even start to talk about the Broadcom-based 80211ac chipsets...

            To my knowledge, Intel's upcoming 802.11ac adapter is the only 802.11ac device whose driver is due for inclusion into the 3.10 kernel.

            And using a Windows host essentially means that Windows serves as the primary operating system; it doesn't magically bring 802.11ac support into Linux. The only thing we know for a fact that is work is being done to make the 80211 stack in Linux ac capable, but having an 'ac' capable stack does not mean anything if there are no drivers to support the hardware.
            Last edited by Sonadow; 05-21-2013, 04:41 AM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

              To my knowledge, Intel's upcoming 802.11ac adapter is the only 802.11ac device whose driver is due for inclusion into the 3.10 kernel.

              And using a Windows host essentially means that Windows serves as the primary operating system; it doesn't magically bring 802.11ac support into Linux. The only thing we know for a fact that is work is being done to make the 80211 stack in Linux ac capable, but having an 'ac' capable stack does not mean anything if there are no drivers to support the hardware.
              None of these changes the fact that virtual machines are more useful and more popular a setup for most cases than dual booting. Nobody said vm's add to hardware support. So I don't know what you are arguing about at all.
              Last edited by RahulSundaram; 05-21-2013, 05:07 AM.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post
                None of these changes the fact that virtual machines are more useful and more popular a setup for most cases than dual booting. Nobody said vm's add to hardware support. So I don't know what you are arguing about at all.
                You said that VM's are suitable for most purposes today, so I pointed out that VM's are no substitute for actual hardware support. That was the point I wanted to make.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                  You said that VM's are suitable for most purposes today, so I pointed out that VM's are no substitute for actual hardware support. That was the point I wanted to make.
                  Nobody claimed otherwise. Most doesn't mean all, obviously.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post
                    Nobody claimed otherwise. Most doesn't mean all, obviously.
                    Fine then, it's my mistake for insinuating otherwise. My apologies.

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