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Manjaro: A Convenient Way To Play With Arch Linux

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  • #11
    When you try out Manjaro you try out Manjaro not Arch Linux.

    I like how most keep whining that Arch is supposedly so tedious to install and that it takes so long.
    LOL what a load of horseshit. Setting up Arch is a lot faster than most distros. Installing Arch means typing 6 commands into the terminal.

    "gdisk /dev/sda" Press "n" to make a partition". Press "w" to write changes.
    "mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1"
    "mount /dev/sda1 /mnt"
    "pacstrap /mnt base base-devel syslinux"
    "syslinux-install_update -i -a -m -c /mnt"
    "genfstab -p /mnt > /mnt/etc/fstab"

    Tada. Arch is installed. Reboot. Point the default syslinux config to your root partition and boot it.

    Get yourself an ip address with "dhcpd <interface>" and install network manager and enable it with systemd so you have internet right away the next time you boot.
    Install your prop. graphcs driver which also pulls in xorg.

    Want a desktop? Install one of the meta packages and enable the desktop manager with systemd. Create a user. Reboot. Tada there's your Arch Linux destop.

    Wow that was super hard and took a full 6-7 minutes.
    Last edited by blackout23; 04-23-2013, 07:54 AM.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
      When you try out Manjaro you try out Manjaro not Arch Linux.

      I like how most keep whining that Arch is supposedly so tedious to install and that it takes so long.
      LOL what a load of horseshit. Setting up Arch is a lot faster than most distros. Installing Arch means typing 6 commands into the terminal.

      "gdisk /dev/sda" Press "n" to make a partition". Press "w" to write changes.
      "mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1"
      "mount /dev/sda1 /mnt"
      "pacstrap /mnt base base-devel syslinux"
      "syslinux-install_update -i -a -m -c /mnt"
      "genfstab -p /mnt > /mnt/etc/fstab"

      Tada. Arch is installed. Reboot. Point the default syslinux config to your root partition and boot it.

      Get yourself an ip address with "dhcpd <interface>" and install network manager and enable it with systemd so you have internet right away the next time you boot.
      Install your prop. graphcs driver which also pulls in xorg.

      Want a desktop? Install one of the meta packages and enable the desktop manager with systemd. Create a user. Reboot. Tada there's your Arch Linux destop.

      Wow that was super hard and took a full 6-7 minutes.
      I've just read that in voice of some in-his-moms-basement-living-nerd sorry

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      • #13
        Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
        When you try out Manjaro you try out Manjaro not Arch Linux.

        I like how most keep whining that Arch is supposedly so tedious to install and that it takes so long.
        LOL what a load of horseshit. Setting up Arch is a lot faster than most distros. Installing Arch means typing 6 commands into the terminal.

        "gdisk /dev/sda" Press "n" to make a partition". Press "w" to write changes.
        "mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1"
        "mount /dev/sda1 /mnt"
        "pacstrap /mnt base base-devel syslinux"
        "syslinux-install_update -i -a -m -c /mnt"
        "genfstab -p /mnt > /mnt/etc/fstab"

        Tada. Arch is installed. Reboot. Point the default syslinux config to your root partition and boot it.

        Get yourself an ip address with "dhcpd <interface>" and install network manager and enable it with systemd so you have internet right away the next time you boot.
        Install your prop. graphcs driver which also pulls in xorg.

        Want a desktop? Install one of the meta packages and enable the desktop manager with systemd. Create a user. Reboot. Tada there's your Arch Linux destop.

        Wow that was super hard and took a full 6-7 minutes.
        Well, it takes 6-7 minutes if you have a good internet connection and an SSD. But otherwise, yeah, Arch is POTENTIALLY faster to install than most distros. If you use a pretty big collection of programs and don't care about micromanagement then a distro like Ubuntu might be slightly faster to install - at least Ubuntu lets you set up stuff like time zones and user accounts while you wait for everything else to install, which in itself is a time saver.

        Anyways, being an Arch user I completely understand Michael not wanting to run tests on Arch, but only due to the rolling-release sense (it's hard to make a benchmark worth documenting when there's no "reference point" aside from the date). With Arch being script-based, it's potentially even faster to install than how Blackout mentioned - and that's with any combination of desktop environments. IMHO, Arch is the best distro to use when doing quick tests between individual software releases such as a new kernel or video drivers. However, Ubuntu is the best distro for real-world tests like comparing between OSes because Ubuntu is the linux standard, as much as none of us want to admit that.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
          I've just read that in voice of some in-his-moms-basement-living-nerd sorry
          +1. For him, in this world, what's linux command is bestowed upon man, and they just understand that. Without learning.

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          • #15
            I use Chakra, another distro that came out of Archlinux. It's been rock stable for me for the past 2 years (no reinstall). I do use it for some light experimenting (running on btrfs, KDE betas and whatnot). For serious crazy experimentation, Gentoo is IMO the way to go : adding patches to the system is brain-dead easy, running git versions of almost anything is even easier. I haven't been able to test git versions safely with Fedora/Ubuntu (Safely = easy rollback)
            It can also be used as a reference for benchmarks, since its stable repository really is stable. Simply note the versions of the most important packages (glibc, X, pixman...) and you have a stable reference.
            Both Arch and Gentoo are installable (in their most basic form) within a 10 minute time-frame. And both installs are beatifully scriptable. => I respectfully disagree with Michael's time argument.

            Serafean

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            • #16
              Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
              When you try out Manjaro you try out Manjaro not Arch Linux.

              I like how most keep whining that Arch is supposedly so tedious to install and that it takes so long.
              LOL what a load of horseshit. Setting up Arch is a lot faster than most distros. Installing Arch means typing 6 commands into the terminal.

              "gdisk /dev/sda" Press "n" to make a partition". Press "w" to write changes.
              "mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1"
              "mount /dev/sda1 /mnt"
              "pacstrap /mnt base base-devel syslinux"
              "syslinux-install_update -i -a -m -c /mnt"
              "genfstab -p /mnt > /mnt/etc/fstab"

              Tada. Arch is installed. Reboot. Point the default syslinux config to your root partition and boot it.

              Get yourself an ip address with "dhcpd <interface>" and install network manager and enable it with systemd so you have internet right away the next time you boot.
              Install your prop. graphcs driver which also pulls in xorg.

              Want a desktop? Install one of the meta packages and enable the desktop manager with systemd. Create a user. Reboot. Tada there's your Arch Linux destop.

              Wow that was super hard and took a full 6-7 minutes.
              You seem to assume that command lines are just character strings typed at an average of 50 wpm. They're not. You have to google or man them, check they are correct, check they are up to date (which requires additional research), etc...
              This takes much more than 6-7 minutes.
              Command line is efficient for tasks you do regularly, or automate. Installing an OS doesn't really fall into that category for most people.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by erendorn View Post
                You seem to assume that command lines are just character strings typed at an average of 50 wpm. They're not. You have to google or man them, check they are correct, check they are up to date (which requires additional research), etc...
                This takes much more than 6-7 minutes.
                Command line is efficient for tasks you do regularly, or automate. Installing an OS doesn't really fall into that category for most people.
                Or read the newbe guide. You don't really need to know anything to install arch linux, they have everything documented. If you have at lest a little experience with linux before, the installation is a no brainier.

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                • #18
                  ArchLive

                  It's damned easy to build your own Arch ISO : I wrote howto to bundle nvidia blender xfce in my wiki

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Akka View Post
                    Or read the newbe guide.
                    Try doing that and installing Arch in 6-7 minutes. I'll give you a cookie if you can.

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                    • #20
                      I've installed Arch ~8 years ago. SInce then, I've migrated from 32bit to 64bit, several times changed hardware, migrated partitions, all that without a reinstall. So why the heck all that fuss about installing Arch when you will have to install it only once in a lifetime?

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