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Debian 7.0 "Wheezy" Installer Release Candidate 1

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Kano View Post
    Steam worked since the beginning with Debian with my script.
    Much appreciated.

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    • #12
      @stqn

      It is basically simple when you are able to download the missing libs before you execute binaries. Or you just try to execute the bootstrap code, check the errorlevel. In case it failed then you download the libc6 (i dont know why valve has got so many libs in the environment, thats not even needed) and put the libc6 in the same dir (thats what i use) or a bit cleaner use a different dir but in LD_LIBRARY_PATH set by the launcher.

      When the first signs have been there for a Linux client i was able to bootstrap the client completely with a small bash script, all i needed was

      http://store.steampowered.com/public...m_client_linux

      i did not monitor the internet traffic to know what url is used right now, maybe somebody will find the correct url and i can write my own bootstrap code. it is a piece of cake, i wrote similar things for win32 and osx

      http://phoronix.com/forums/showthrea...622#post123622

      http://phoronix.com/forums/showthrea...688#post123688

      I think i had a better script that wrote the file with the checksums in the correct place as well but you should get the idea how it works. It's definitely no rocket science you need to learn to do it right.

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      • #13
        Yo. I have heard Debian now made Cinnamon and eudev default. They did so because of the very convincing arguments stated on the Phoronix forums. Is that true?

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        • #14
          Originally posted by funkSTAR View Post
          Yo. I have heard Debian now made Cinnamon and eudev default. They did so because of the very convincing arguments stated on the Phoronix forums. Is that true?
          No

          Gnome 3.4

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          • #15
            Originally posted by funkSTAR View Post
            Yo. I have heard Debian now made Cinnamon and eudev default. They did so because of the very convincing arguments stated on the Phoronix forums. Is that true?
            Debian is a conservative distro. They stick to outdated technologies.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
              Debian is a conservative distro. They stick to outdated technologies.
              Outdated is one way of describing things, "well known, understood and tested", would be another. I'm speaking in generalities here, but I'd be surprised if the debian developers weren't aware of the latest developments, and since they are likely to be aware of them, they must have decided to play it safe and stick with the more tried and tested ("outdated") technologies, until the new ones have a good track record.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by archibald View Post
                Outdated is one way of describing things, "well known, understood and tested", would be another. I'm speaking in generalities here, but I'd be surprised if the debian developers weren't aware of the latest developments, and since they are likely to be aware of them, they must have decided to play it safe and stick with the more tried and tested ("outdated") technologies, until the new ones have a good track record.
                I know, I <3 Debian, and switching the init system this late into a release cycle would be stupid.

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                • #18
                  I am on a Debian Wheezy based distro (antiX 13 beta). It's great so far, not any less stable than Fedora 18. Has much more packages in the repository and is also suitable for old computers. Required minimum RAM for Fedora 18 768 MB RAM; for antiX 13: 128 MB RAM

                  The persistant Live USB feature works as well, it is at first a bit tricky to find out how to do it though.

                  I used several years Fedora as my primary system, but now this time is gone.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                    However its not really a good idea to do a netinstall over a wireless connection as the connection is not as stable as an Ethernet connection, but soon you can if you do trust your wifi connection.
                    What's the difference between doing a netinstall via a wireless connection and updating an existing system? You can have corrupted traffic in both cases, and you can botch your system in both cases.

                    I don't really have a choice anyway. I don't have a long enough Ethernet cable.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by archibald View Post
                      Outdated is one way of describing things, "well known, understood and tested", would be another. I'm speaking in generalities here, but I'd be surprised if the debian developers weren't aware of the latest developments, and since they are likely to be aware of them, they must have decided to play it safe and stick with the more tried and tested ("outdated") technologies, until the new ones have a good track record.
                      To extend off of that, my distributions of choice for home stuff is Arch and Gentoo because it's pretty easy to stay up-to-date with more bleeding edge stuff. Production servers on the other hand, I want something that's STABLE. Debian is my go-to distribution for servers with software that's been tried-and-proven to work (except for, you know, that one huge blunder that we never speak of).

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