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Alan Cox Calls Fedora 18 "The Worst Red Hat Distro"

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  • Originally posted by lsatenstein View Post
    Whein I run sudo nautilus or sudo nemo, nemo or nautilus has root privileges, and I am in /root I do not want to do so because I do not want to be in /root.
    That's why you should also append a dot, so instead of "sudo nautilus", "sudo nemo" or "kdesu dolphin", do "sudo nautilus .", "sudo nemo ." or "kdesu dolphin .", they will then default to the directory they were called from. Also, in KDE the shortcut in the K menu is also set to default to starting in ~ instead of /root.

    Originally posted by lsatenstein View Post
    I am in Montreal Quebec Canada. GreatEmerald, where are you located?
    Lithuania. I should probably update my profile to show that, hmm...

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    • Tried it, like it, thank you

      Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
      That's why you should also append a dot, so instead of "sudo nautilus", "sudo nemo" or "kdesu dolphin", do "sudo nautilus .", "sudo nemo ." or "kdesu dolphin .", they will then default to the directory they were called from. Also, in KDE the shortcut in the K menu is also set to default to starting in ~ instead of /root.




      Lithuania. I should probably update my profile to show that, hmm...
      I tried the dot, I like it, and will now not be following my old ways.

      It reminds me of setting up new path statements with a bash script, only needed to put the dot before the script name.





      The closest to Lithuania I have been is Riga Latvia.

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      • Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
        You should not even have to run anything as root, except some commands, in which case "su" in a terminal is better than "sudo", because with sudo you either constantly have to type the damn sudo command, or automatically get root rights for a period of time, so the user looses track of what commands run as root, and what runs as user. Better just have a root terminal where one can be sure what commands will run as root and what commands run as user.
        With 'sudo -i' (or 'sudo -s' which does some things differently with the environment) you can start a root shell (provided the 'sudoers' config allows that for your user, of course).

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        • Originally posted by yogi_berra View Post
          Not quite. It was written because gnu su will never limit users from root access because someone decided RMS didn't need root access at MIT (he probably didn't) and it scarred him for life.
          Which is exactly what I said, except for using real world examples?

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          • Originally posted by JanC View Post
            Which is exactly what I said, except for using real world examples?
            not really, you said this:

            it was "invented" to allow certain users to run certain applications (with certain options) as root (or as a certain user) without (necessarily) needing the root password (or the password of that certain user).

            Additionally, it also logs every invocation.
            That just explains what sudo does, not why it was written.

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            • Someone wanted a real world example ?

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              • Found a circumvention

                Originally posted by JanC View Post
                With 'sudo -i' (or 'sudo -s' which does some things differently with the environment) you can start a root shell (provided the 'sudoers' config allows that for your user, of course).

                I recently started to use sudo nautilus . to start the shell with root priviledges in the current directory. I sometimes remain in the shell in order to do change ownerships.
                Text was increased in size to show the dot

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                • Originally posted by lsatenstein View Post
                  I recently started to use sudo nautilus . to start the shell with root priviledges in the current directory. I sometimes remain in the shell in order to do change ownerships.
                  Text was increased in size to show the dot
                  You should only use 'sudo' for command-line programs.
                  If you want to run application software with graphical user interfaces then you should use 'gksudo'.

                  Like "gksudo nautilus ."

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                  • Every distro has a worst release.

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                    • gksudo does not exist in Fedora 18

                      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                      You should only use 'sudo' for command-line programs.
                      If you want to run application software with graphical user interfaces then you should use 'gksudo'.

                      Like "gksudo nautilus ."
                      Is gksudo a shell script that calls sudo?

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