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  • Ubuntu To Eventually Have Its Own SDK

    Phoronix: Ubuntu To Eventually Have Its Own SDK

    As I wrote over the weekend, Canonical is planning to eventually ship its own SDK (Software Development Kit) for Ubuntu Linux to ease software development on the open-source platform. The Ubuntu SDK won't happen for the Ubuntu 13.04 release, but work is being planned about what to include in this Ubuntu-specific SDK...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTIxNzc

  • #2
    yeah, let's make people write their programs for ubuntu instead of linux so that ubuntu becomes incompatible to all other distros while having a majority of the market share. sounds familiar

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    • #3
      Alright. They're just trying to make developing apps for Ubuntu easier, I get that. But do they seriously expect some credible apps (think: Steam, LibreOffice, Google Earth, Adobe Photoshop) to be made using these Ubuntu-specific tools? Heck, the SDK will probably be leaning on Python for programming language.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dstaubsauger View Post
        yeah, let's make people write their programs for ubuntu instead of linux so that ubuntu becomes incompatible to all other distros while having a majority of the market share. sounds familiar
        How dare they add features to their own product!

        It's not like this is going to be glued to Ubuntu, it will probably just re use existing APIs and make developing easier. It will be FOSS too so it's not like nobody else can use them either.

        I don't see people bitching android is incompatible with regular GNU/Linux.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by n3wu53r View Post
          I don't see people bitching android is incompatible with regular GNU/Linux.
          Actually, many are bitching about that, and I see a good reason for it. Let's hope the compatibility will be improved in the future.

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          • #6
            I do not like that idea. There are already too many games out there which have been compiled against a too new libc6 - newer than the ones in Debian. That will only help Ubuntu but nobody else.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kano View Post
              I do not like that idea. There are already too many games out there which have been compiled against a too new libc6 - newer than the ones in Debian. That will only help Ubuntu but nobody else.
              The real problem is that the games don't ship their own library. Compiling for a distro that is known for shipping horribly outdated packages is just silly.

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              • #8
                You got it completely wrong, you can ship current libs but the libc6 used must be old enough to allow other distros run the code, that's the main dependency of a system. Some HIB games come out and only ran with Ubuntu and not Debian, that's definitely wrong. Partly only the installer was compiled against that new code - manually extracting helped but that's not user friendly. The Linux world does not only consists of Ubuntu only - they just intend to ship always a very new libc6...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by n3wu53r View Post
                  How dare they add features to their own product!
                  How much of that product did they actually produce?

                  It's not like this is going to be glued to Ubuntu, it will probably just re use existing APIs and make developing easier. It will be FOSS too so it's not like nobody else can use them either.
                  Oh yes, we've seen that one in action, haven't we?

                  That's why their X is essentially forked, GNOME essentially forked, and Unity doesn't work with standard versions found in other distributions. And porting all their patches over is a nightmare.

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                  • #10
                    Makes sense

                    Fact 1: There are thousend apps written for Linux/Android, for each one written for other distros combined.
                    Fact 2: Reason for this is that documentation, IDE and packaging is on different level then for Ubuntu (Fedora, ...).
                    Fact 3: While tools like Emacs and M4 were OK in 1985, for new kids learning their skills on iOS, Android and HTML5, it looks like joke.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kano View Post
                      You got it completely wrong, you can ship current libs but the libc6 used must be old enough to allow other distros run the code, that's the main dependency of a system. Some HIB games come out and only ran with Ubuntu and not Debian, that's definitely wrong. Partly only the installer was compiled against that new code - manually extracting helped but that's not user friendly. The Linux world does not only consists of Ubuntu only - they just intend to ship always a very new libc6...
                      There is no reason that game developers should have to stick to ancient toolchains to accommodate the few who want to use distros who have a strange hatred for halfway recent packages. Also, if they shipped the used glibc with the package it would work on litteraly /any/ linux system. Third party developers really need to ship their libraries on linux like they do on windows.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kano View Post
                        You got it completely wrong, you can ship current libs but the libc6 used must be old enough to allow other distros run the code, that's the main dependency of a system. Some HIB games come out and only ran with Ubuntu and not Debian, that's definitely wrong. Partly only the installer was compiled against that new code - manually extracting helped but that's not user friendly. The Linux world does not only consists of Ubuntu only - they just intend to ship always a very new libc6...
                        Ubuntu 10.04 is still supported too; and I would be surprised if those games would work with it but not with Debian stable...

                        So it's in the best interest of those game developers to make sure older versions work too (especially now that Ubuntu desktop versions get 5 years of support).

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                        • #13
                          @ShadowBane

                          It is correct that you could extract the libc6 package and put it in a dir which you specify using LD_LIBRARY_PATH but thats not really user friendly. Usually nobody ships libc6 with a game.

                          @JanC

                          That's just a dark theory that this would work. Two examples:

                          a) Warsow - the binary in the tar.gz would work on U 10.04 but does not because it is compiled against a custom installed libpng15 which is not available in Debian/Ubuntu. Precompiled binaries for U 12.04 is available to be used on top.

                          b) Reaction

                          This is compiled against a libc6 from U 12.04. It starts using an extracted libc6 i386 - very user friendly.

                          Basically it is not that problematic for those examples as you can get the source and compile it on your own. But it shows that Linux binaries are often problematic for ppl with older Ubuntu installs or other distros like Debian. It's mainly the missing out-the-box experience that you usually get with Win.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kano View Post
                            @ShadowBane

                            It is correct that you could extract the libc6 package and put it in a dir which you specify using LD_LIBRARY_PATH but thats not really user friendly. Usually nobody ships libc6 with a game.
                            A lot of games and stuff provide a launcher script that can do things like specify the library paths before loading the game. It is literally no extra work for the end user.

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