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There's Still Interest In A Fedora Software Center

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  • There's Still Interest In A Fedora Software Center

    Phoronix: There's Still Interest In A Fedora Software Center

    It's a topic that has been brought up before, but there's still a number of users and developers interested in seeing a "Software Center" / "App Store" for Fedora Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTIwMjA

  • #2
    For linux or GNU/Linux as whoe community a Software Center that is distrubtion indepent is better, espacially for saving the most unique factor that all distrubtions are some way different but in some way the same, which improves the flexibillity of Linux.
    A distrubtion dependent store only helps the distrubtion that has it and may be leaves the pupblicity from GNU/Linux and moves them to the distruntion like with Ubuntu (go and seek the Linux on ubuntu.com).

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    • #3
      What you want is basically steam, desura or similar tools which just install apps in your home.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Kano View Post
        What you want is basically steam, desura or similar tools which just install apps in your home.
        You meant me? If yes this wasn't what I meant.

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        • #5
          I'd also rather have a Linux software center instead of 'distribution' software center.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by M1AU View Post
            I'd also rather have a Linux software center instead of 'distribution' software center.
            This doesn't make any sense. Every distribution is an operating system in itself, a closed ecosystem.
            They might share components, but they're still separated.

            If I see exactly the same software center in two distros, I expect the software I download there
            to work exactly the same as well, which isn't always the case (it just appears this way on the surface).
            Different distros might package different things together, or even apply different patches and
            compile in separate ways.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ancurio View Post
              This doesn't make any sense. Every distribution is an operating system in itself, a closed ecosystem.
              They might share components, but they're still separated.

              If I see exactly the same software center in two distros, I expect the software I download there
              to work exactly the same as well, which isn't always the case (it just appears this way on the surface).
              Different distros might package different things together, or even apply different patches and
              compile in separate ways.
              Well, you sure are right in that, choice is often welcome, but I'd look at the Android ecosystem and see all kinds of different phone manufacturers which have somekind of there own distribution and basically all are binary compatible throughout the Android Play store. That's part of the reason why it's so successful I'd say.

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              • #8
                I think the reason why users go for Ubuntu istead of fedora is simply the target user. Fedora is not for the common user. For example you don't have the very popular VLC media player in the official repo. You quite surely need to add the rpmfusion repo. The official one is quite scarse in packages, but they are very high in quality usually. What is missing is also propietary drivers. I can understand fglrx can't be packaged for fedora due to missing support for the lastest Xorg in the AMD driver, but the nvidia one at least has always a beta supporting it. Still it is not packaged by default and cannot be installed automatically during the system install or automagically in any way. You have to go in the package manager, add the rpmfusion repository manually (a package to add it automatically like in Scientific Linux for epel, rpmforge, atrpm would be very nice), and install the driver manually.

                If you think a fedora software center would change something, think twice.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by enrico.tagliavini View Post
                  I think the reason why users go for Ubuntu istead of fedora is simply the target user. Fedora is not for the common user. For example you don't have the very popular VLC media player in the official repo. You quite surely need to add the rpmfusion repo. The official one is quite scarse in packages, but they are very high in quality usually. What is missing is also propietary drivers. I can understand fglrx can't be packaged for fedora due to missing support for the lastest Xorg in the AMD driver, but the nvidia one at least has always a beta supporting it. Still it is not packaged by default and cannot be installed automatically during the system install or automagically in any way. You have to go in the package manager, add the rpmfusion repository manually (a package to add it automatically like in Scientific Linux for epel, rpmforge, atrpm would be very nice), and install the driver manually.

                  If you think a fedora software center would change something, think twice.
                  I agree. Fedora is different in that it has very high standards in regard to software freedom, so it can't easily include such things,
                  hence Ubuntu/Mint are easier for the common user. I prefer Fedora because I prefer yum, but that might just be me =P

                  Although it is not as bad as you make it sound. I'm sure I've seen a GUI tool somewhere to facilitates most if not all common
                  things a user might want (rpmfusion, mp3, flash etc.)

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