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Ubuntu Still Aims For Wayland System Compositor

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  • #11
    The Linux Desktop has so many issues that the boot screen issue is really low priority. I wouldn't even call it an issue.

    If you want I could create a list of at least 100 VERY IMPORTANT issues the Linux Desktop has. But of course, "looks" are more important right?

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    • #12
      Originally posted by bulletxt View Post
      The Linux Desktop has so many issues that the boot screen issue is really low priority. I wouldn't even call it an issue.

      If you want I could create a list of at least 100 VERY IMPORTANT issues the Linux Desktop has. But of course, "looks" are more important right?
      It's definitely low priority. It's just always disappointing when you see regressions between one version and the next.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by bulletxt View Post
        The Linux Desktop has so many issues that the boot screen issue is really low priority. I wouldn't even call it an issue.

        If you want I could create a list of at least 100 VERY IMPORTANT issues the Linux Desktop has. But of course, "looks" are more important right?
        "Looks" is what users interact with -be it the console or a DE- so IMO its almost as important as the technical stuff. Noone (period) would marry a fat, really ugly woman just because she functions properly.


        Personally i care a lot about visuals and user experience. And the situation is horrid. Be it icons and themes, be it the brain damage of the DE UX developers (gnome especially), be it cursors blinking, blank screens and all those little things that need polishing and people don't seem to care.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
          "Looks" is what users interact with -be it the console or a DE- so IMO its almost as important as the technical stuff. Noone (period) would marry a fat, really ugly woman just because she functions properly.


          Personally i care a lot about visuals and user experience. And the situation is horrid. Be it icons and themes, be it the brain damage of the DE UX developers (gnome especially), be it cursors blinking, blank screens and all those little things that need polishing and people don't seem to care.
          Part of the problem is that the community tries to polish some stuff up and add some features and just as things are looking like they almost pass muster, the head devs (gnome, etc.) declare, "Okay boys! Throw everything out; we're starting over from scratch!"

          And that's exactly what I expect Wayland to be.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by mark45 View Post
            I noticed the Wayland mailing list stagnated a lot.
            For a long time there were like 10-30 messages a day, now it's between 1-10 a day, or none, even during non-weekends. Are they preparing some major release behind the scene or gone on vacation..?
            A lot of the devs are based in US, and this week we had our independence day (July 4), and it occured in the middle of the week. It's not uncommon to take the entire week off as a result.
            Also, 1.0 IS supposed to be arriving later this year, so they've only got a few months left. Once they finalize the input protocol, I think they're mostly finished with the outlines, if not all the detail.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
              I think the next version should be called 12.04 since the current 12.04 is too much of a mess to call it official...Seriously what is going on? Ubuntu used to actually work. Now it's bugs and inconsistencies that don't actually get fixed.
              What doesn't work? I have it on a laptop and it runs just fine.

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              • #17
                people miss the fundamental problem and the root cause of the audio/video stack sucking in unix for 20 years. because unix/linux is primarily a server platform there is simply no incentive for the big names to make the a/v stack better. you think you need color calibration or anti-aliasing when you are running oracledb or apache on a cluster. games and directx are really the impetus on windows. and audio apps/final cut on the mac make apple make sure that the audio and the video are top notch. until that changes I don't see linux having graphics on par with windows.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by curaga View Post
                  Here's how their seamless boot works in 12.04.

                  After bios, black screen for 5s.
                  Plymouth splash shows itself for 0.7s.
                  LightDM login screen.

                  I'm no UI designer, but something about that black/plymouth time ratio seems off
                  Same here for me with 12.04.

                  But in fedora 17 it works flawlessly on the same machine. When I boot fedora 17, immediately after grub I get the nice high res fedora plymouth spash for the rest of the boot, then is smoothly transisitons to gdm. SO MUCH SMOOTHER than ubuntu's boot process.

                  Fedora has had this working well for the past few releases, while ubuntu's boot has looked pretty bad for quite some time.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by curaga View Post
                    Here's how their seamless boot works in 12.04.

                    After bios, black screen for 5s.
                    Plymouth splash shows itself for 0.7s.
                    LightDM login screen.

                    I'm no UI designer, but something about that black/plymouth time ratio seems off
                    So true it hurts, i'm waiting for trisquel, maybe they can fix this goddamn issue

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by garegin View Post
                      people miss the fundamental problem and the root cause of the audio/video stack sucking in unix for 20 years. because unix/linux is primarily a server platform there is simply no incentive for the big names to make the a/v stack better. you think you need color calibration or anti-aliasing when you are running oracledb or apache on a cluster. games and directx are really the impetus on windows. and audio apps/final cut on the mac make apple make sure that the audio and the video are top notch. until that changes I don't see linux having graphics on par with windows.
                      I take it you don't do much with the pro audio stack.. Jack blows away everything on the other platforms (ok, it also exists for mac/windows but it isn't widely deployed or supported there)

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