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Ubuntu 12.04 vs. Windows 7: Intel Sandy/Ivy Bridge Loses On Linux

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  • #11
    Ubuntu 12.04 vs. Windows 7: Intel Sandy/Ivy Bridge Loses On Linux
    I read through the article and the only loser that I was able to find was Michael.

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    • #12
      Games on Windows

      That's the funny thing about Windows. It's not lightweight. It never has been. It always tends to err on the side of too much. Many of it's features are only available on "heavy" DE's, and it still has some features that haven't made it to any Linux DE yet.

      And because of that, Windows has rightfully earned a reputation as "bloated". But, despite that, games always seemed to be able to draw out far, far better results than on Linux. Back in the olden days, when I was still running XP, I got the impression that when a game runs, it sort of "shuts down" everything else. But, that has never been the case on Linux.

      Personally, I think the difference might have something to do with the way that the Linux kernel was written with respect to Windows. Windows started as a "single user" system. Where there is basically only one user that does all kinds of things on the system, whereas Linux is multiple-user system, where it assigns processes to different users like "Bob" or "Claire" or "Root". The multiple user system has a fantastic amount of advantages. Advantages in security, in the way the filesystem evolved to not need defragmentation, etc. But, I think that the Windows approach might give it the edge when it comes to games.

      When you click on "Nexuiz" on Linux, it's the user that's logged in, that is starting those processes. But, from the computer's perspective, "Bob" could very well just be a snot-nosed kid that the system administrator (root) doesn't trust at all. So nothing that "Bob" can click on, should be allowed to mess around with the system processes. So it might be that on Windows it's a case of: [Bob: "Computer, I am want to play a game now, you can finish the other things you're doing later." whereas on Linux is more a case of: [PC: "Bob, you are not allowed to interupt the apt-get dist-upgrade process or stop Claire's download, but here's a game you're allowed to run in whatever resources are left."]

      At least, that's my own hypothesis... It could just be a case of the Windows sector having more money to pump into developing drivers. But, it would have been very interesting to see what Windows does when it launches a game, if the source code was available.

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      • #13
        SABAYON & ARCH and 1000 Hz or real time kernels

        Ubuntu is the most used distro - Mint is ubuntu with some adds -

        But it is not the best in performance.

        It would be helpful to add to the mix SABAYON - 1000 Hz kernel in Sabayon vs 300 Hz in MS WOS and 100 Hz in Ubuntu -

        This articles explains how to compile Ubuntu 64 bits kernel at 1000 Hz or "real time kernel" for better playing

        http://duopetalflower.blogspot.com.e...it-kernel.html
        http://www.linuxerz.org/2011/08/kernel-rt-debian/

        ARCH is also an almost Rolling Release distro that a lot of Linux advanced users like to use.

        Ubuntu default kernel is not make for gaming, making this benchmark this way is a bad favour you make to yourself.

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        • #14
          Lol, Arch? Sabayon? How about pure, 100% Gentoo?

          The benchmarks would mean something for comparisons the system it runs on. Doubt Michael wants to spend that much time on perfection, though.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by StephanG View Post
            Personally, I think the difference might have something to do with the way that the Linux kernel was written with respect to Windows. Windows started as a "single user" system. Where there is basically only one user that does all kinds of things on the system, whereas Linux is multiple-user system, where it assigns processes to different users like "Bob" or "Claire" or "Root".
            Windows as a single user system ended with Windows ME, XP onwared (based on Windows NT) are alle multi user systems from the core. Also when Windows decides that it is time to index your files you can just sit happily alog for the ride. Not only that but while your are playing a game it might decide that it wants to update and then restart your computer with out actually warning you.

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            • #16
              I'm glad I don't drink the Intel kool-aid.

              We'll see how the nvidia benchmarks go, but I'd be surprised if there's a significant difference between the two operating systems.

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              • #17
                The open-source Intel Linux driver also still is not able to ship with support by default for S3TC texture compression or floating-point textures due to patent fears.
                WHat level of the difference is due to this?

                Also have the deeper and deepest rc6 states been enabled for intel on linux?

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                • #18
                  Honestly, these numbers are not that disappointing. The "50%" number is pretty exaggerated, because there were quite a few tests where Ivy Bridge's performance gap on Linux was under 50%. And frankly I think that is just fine for a driver that has only been in use by the general public on GA hardware for, at most, 2 weeks. I know that things will improve.

                  The Intel OSTC team is amazing. They deserve all the kudos in the world for basically shaping the foundations of the open source graphics stack in the mid-2000s and for bringing it full circle to being on the order of only 50% the speed of the proprietary Windows driver (which we'll assume utilizes the hardware pretty much to its fullest).

                  I have to admit that I was pretty frustrated with the churn, the bugs and the problems that were plaguing my 965GM chipset, but now that I have an Ivy Bridge desktop processor, I'm in love with Intel graphics again. I can't wait for OpenCL; until then I am VERY pleased with where the graphics stack is right now.

                  To the Intel folks out there: you guys are open source heroes! And it must be nice to completely corner the market as far as robust open source graphics drivers -- your competition doesn't even come close.

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                  • #19
                    Linux is always a 2nd class citizen. While I applaud Intel's open source efforts, and they probably do have the best Open Source driver out of all the gfx manufacturers (Intel, AMD, Nvidia), even their OSS driver falls far short of the closed-source performance. 50% is a big hit to pay for OSS drivers, and yes, I know that AMD and Nvidia suffer more, but still, here's hoping that Intel can close the gap.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by WorBlux View Post
                      WHat level of the difference is due to this?
                      None of where Windows won. S3TC - usually a wash. Float textures - slower.

                      So if the game actually used float textures, it'd have worse performance.

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