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What Do You Dislike or Hate About Ubuntu?

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  • I have been happily using Ubuntu since 6.06.
    Every subsequent release has been more pleasurable to use than the last, although these days I stick to the .04 releases (they just seem more stable)

    I like the design, I love Unity (it's how my desktop was set-up before unity)
    I love the software centre.
    I love the way you shove a CD in a PC and it just works (I know, not an Ubuntu thing, that's a gnu/Linux thing)
    Generally, for my usage pattern (myth, web, email, media, attractive interface), it hits the mark.
    I like the fact I can put it on other people's machines and they just get it.
    Most Linux distros, in they're default install, are kinda embarrassing

    Maybe my opinion would change if I used it for something harder, like Android development.

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    • Who here believes that Ubuntu has a large user base because they target windows users? Given the likes of NixiePixel on youtube, an avid Ubuntu user:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qR591lh5Ow

      I feel that Ubuntu targets people who aren't so technically minded... Maybe transitional users who wish to try something different to windows. For that reason, I would argue that it's a good distro. But for existing linux users, how many people keep using Ubuntu 5 years down the track. This reminds me of Mandriva and SuseLinux in many ways. So I'm not sure I care if it feels dumbed down or focuses on cutting edge to attract it's user base. It's simply not my cup of tea, now that I'm a long term Linux user. I'm going to use a different OS regardless of their plans to haul over more M$ users.

      Originally posted by baffledmollusc View Post
      I feel Ubuntu is to a large extent a victim of it's own popularity. Many long time linux users claim to despise it for various reasons, but behind that the real reason seems to be that they don't like the idea that it tries to be easy to use. I see the phrase "dumbing down" a lot. I don't get this. It has a terminal, you can install whatever software you like, where's the problem? And if someone doesn't like Ubuntu, they can just use a different distro; no need to get virulent about it.
      Totally agree with this. How do you keep an OS tidy, clean and concise when the user base is already bloated. That is a task in itself!! Maybe an open source project needs to be developed to cure this issue. If Ubuntu has a mission statement that focuses on community and the user base, it will need to somehow keep to it's word. At the same time, there is a nightmare involved with managing the huge spectrum of it's user base. First time computer users right up to and including advanced system developers!

      Originally posted by SunnyDrake View Post
      Very good post i feel same.. but let's not forget that UBUNTU must not be M$ or IBM in way it uses developers. The hook is "ubuntu-only" IDE.. ubuntu-only LARGE DOCUMENTATUION with complex learning curve.. certificates etc.. Darn Evil Corp's Grrr...
      Don't forget that developers are users too!!

      Originally posted by vczilla View Post
      I think the main think we as a community have to gripe about is this:
      it's 2011 and we still have xorg.conf and half-assed drivers and resizing windows is still shitty as hell ,where is my smooth window resize ala Quart Extreme?

      Linux really needs a complete overhaul in this department. I think Apple had the right idea when they decided not to use X but to build a new display server from scratch.

      I really hope the wayland , gallium, mesa stuff is gonna pan out and finally give us a modern display system .

      And whichever distro ends up using it first doesn't matter ,Linux strength lies in its community and strangely enough in all the quarrels that a community-driven model brings.
      This has to be the biggest conquest of Linux for ALL distro's to date. For advanced users this isn't too much of a problem. Some distro's are faster and more clean than others so they don't suffer as badly with poor implementations of X. I remember back in the Gentoo hay-day, where people compiling X to work with <insert driver>, was one of the biggest hurdles. Even advanced users get short fused with sloppy drivers be it Audio or Video. Quality of the entire system revolves around efficient use of system resources. I feel that Ubuntu lacks a little in this department. Not really a fault of Ubuntu though...

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      • Unity

        I hate unity and the thing they are trying to copy OSX. I consider the human theme simply beautiful but they changed it for the ugly new one.

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        • The instability and the frequent and unfathomable upgrade problems. Now that they won't go full GNOME3 but dick around with their own Unity it's just a final no-no on my behalf.

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          • minus:
            - forked Debian GNU/Linux instead of having a good relationship with it
            - the previous seems to apply to other upstreams.
            - Seems to want to be Linux itself, yet hardly sponsors any major community project unlike RedHat.
            - not a rolling release OS
            - no aur/ebuild like ability
            - heavier than some other distributions


            plus:
            - Made free software more popular

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            • Ubuntu rights and wrongs.

              Originally posted by deanjo View Post
              That's because both Fedora and openSUSE are US based and have patent issues to contend with.



              There are readily available RPM's available at least for openSUSE. No patching required.


              Quite a few, if not most in oS land. Just hang around the irc or forums there and it is well known.



              And has since been eclipsed by the likes of zypper.



              Not even close. The build service is capable of being used by many different distros. It is not limited to building packages just for openSUSE.
              In fact I was being a devil's advocate.
              Ubuntu is big so it tends to attract criticism some fair but not all.
              I was addressing my points to an hypothetical new user of Linux.

              The 'ugly font' part is an almost verbatim citation of a comment I saw on Ars Technica's review of Gnome 3.

              They used Fedora and so when I looked at their screenshots I realized the author didn't touch the default freetype hence 'ugly fonts'.
              And that's my point a 'newbie' cannot know how to solve a problem he doesn't even realize he has (blaming 'stupid Linux' for the fonts).

              Secondly I also talk from personal experience. When I used openSUSE I tended to use 'factory' and it was faster for me to rebuild freetype than to lose time looking for the correct 'freetype-lcd' which anyway would be broken by the regular 'freetype' on the next update.
              I know that you can block certain packages from being updated but then you're exposed to potential dependency problems.

              Then for Fedora you have http://www.infinality.net/blog/subpi...-for-freetype/ which is quite an interesting blog .Not only do they have RPMs for freetype with a custom patch set ( with a modified true type hinter among other things) but they also provide
              enhanced fontconfig rules .

              None the less it remains that font display is an incredibly complex topic.
              I highly recommend this paper : https://freddie.witherden.org/pages/font-rasterisation/ it's a really interesting read for people with an interest on the subject.

              I do love zypper.
              Like I said in my original post I think that openSUSE has the best package manager on KDE (YaST2-qt powered by libzypp).
              Ironically zypper was one of the reasons I switched to Ubuntu because at the time it was really slow.
              Differential updates hadn't been implemented yet and zypper would download each package and then install it whereas apt-get would download everything at once and then proceed with the installation phase which is much faster.

              As for the openSUSE Build Service you're right I was a bit unfair because it's a really good service ( in truth I hadn't checked it out in a long time).
              And Fedora has third parties repositories like RPM Fusion.

              The bottom line is this: Linux progressed by leaps and bounds since 2003 and it would be unfair not to acknowledge the role Ubuntu played in this.

              They are not as bleeding edge as Fedora Rawhide and not as focused on KDE as openSUSE but they try to put their focus where it counts : on their users even if it backfires sometimes ( Unity? Ugly paperwall? Window decorations that used to be brown/orange?) and they have an insane mind share.

              I for one am glad that we have some many choices among high quality distributions thanks to a community that is at the same time collaborative and competitive.

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              • Originally posted by SunnyDrake View Post
                Very good post i feel same.. but let's not forget that UBUNTU must not be M$ or IBM in way it uses developers. The hook is "ubuntu-only" IDE.. ubuntu-only LARGE DOCUMENTATUION with complex learning curve.. certificates etc.. Darn Evil Corp's Grrr...
                Why are they Evil Corps? Whould it be because their developers make money to raise their children, pay rents or their houses? I agree free software but people have to live.

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                • Just to chime in with my thoughts on the matter.

                  When i first tried Unity i hated it, parts of it i still hate. The next release will hopefully see it a lot more polished though, i tend to hate a lot of design decisions Ubuntu makes when it first debut's for a big example i remember that was quite an uproar about where they positioned the notifications, now i couldn't imagine it anywhere else! So i hope my hates and fears of Unity will be eventually solved.

                  Global Menu
                  -The most unfriendly peice of junk ever, why oh why do we have to have ALL programs menus in one place so we can only use and see one at a time? This actually hurts workflow because you have to manually switch to the window to bring up the menu. Sure it saves a couple of pixels space, but it has no place on bigger monitors (i have a 24" monitor), even on my 13" notebook monitor it seems odd.
                  It really does just seem like they copied Apple on this one - it seems to serve no purpose.

                  Unity Menu
                  -You cannot easily add items to it, gnome panel you just literally dragged a shortcut onto it and it's done.

                  New scrollbars
                  -Why, just why i mean again like the global menus, it's creating more waiting, more movement to wait for the bars to appear to then select them to move it, they don't even look good either, it makes most programs look aweful to have these orange lines just plowing through them at the edges.
                  Last edited by liamdawe; 08-02-2011, 03:25 PM.

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                  • Originally posted by baffledmollusc View Post
                    I feel Ubuntu is to a large extent a victim of it's own popularity. Many long time linux users claim to despise it for various reasons, but behind that the real reason seems to be that they don't like the idea that it tries to be easy to use. I see the phrase "dumbing down" a lot. I don't get this. It has a terminal, you can install whatever software you like, where's the problem? And if someone doesn't like Ubuntu, they can just use a different distro; no need to get virulent about it.
                    Fully agreed.

                    No easy way to get newly-released versions of software until the next release. Want the latest version of, say, firefox? Wait six months. Yes, I know about PPAs, but not everyone does. Rolling release FTW! (Yes, I know about the related problems, and I know many people would disagree, but this is about what *I* don't like about Ubuntu :-P)
                    I got firefox six with an update today, so what is the problem?

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                    • Originally posted by liamdawe View Post
                      Global Menu
                      -The most unfriendly peice of junk ever, why oh why do we have to have ALL programs menus in one place so we can only use and see one at a time?
                      It works pretty well on a netbook or similar small computer where the screen isn't very tall and you usually don't run multiple programs at the same time (maybe one or two, not sixteen). It sucks ass on a desktop or laptop with a decent sized screen.

                      This is the real problem: pushing Unity as 'one size fits all' when it's really designed for small screens.

                      I totally agree about the scrollbars though, I absolutely hate them.

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                      • The only thing that is a little annoying is that there is a new distribution for each feature that is not default in the base distribution like [A-Z]buntu etc. That means every time they talk about a new distribution, it's Ubuntu with different default software installed

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                        • What I hate about Ubuntu is that it isn't for me, but newcomers that do not wish to invest any time in educating themselves.

                          And that's what makes Ubuntu great; it's a great choice for the majority of people.

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                          • I'd consider it a good newcomer low maintenance distro (for example for my mother) if the following points were corrected:


                            -Change release model to rolling releases. Release upgrades as they are now tend to break everything twice a year. LTS releases are fine but not as current as a desktop has to be.

                            -Optimized and default apps are fine, but give people the chance to exchange an application for another. As it is now I can't remove the default apps because it would break the ubuntu desktop meta package.


                            As long as those are not met I will stay with Arch + LXDE for my "remote" systems. Clean, customizable and low maintenance. For myself I do everything (desktop, homeserver and notebook) on Gentoo. For my personal use Ubuntu is out of the question anyway.


                            PS: I really can't see the argument about Ubuntu being for interested newcomers. People that do not want to learn about their system will need support anyway, Ubuntu or not. People that are willing to learn will get along great with most distros (OpenSuSe, Fedora, PCLinuxOS... even Arch).
                            Last edited by Dorsai!; 09-12-2011, 09:43 AM.

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                            • I so hate Unity desktop, it makes me feel to go back to KDE-platform. We use Ubuntu in our company but I do not feel anymore we should continue. Unity is so unmature it makes my heart bleed. 'Fallback' mode is much more better to use.

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                              • The thing which I dislike most about the Ubuntu is its hardware support. Some time it creates problem on different hardware.

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