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Ubuntu 11.04: i686 vs. i686 PAE vs. x86_64

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  • #16
    Originally posted by fhuberts View Post
    You can't compare POWER to x86, these are entirely different architectures.
    For one: x86 has _less_ CPU registers in 32 bits mode than in 64 bits mode while POWER has the same number of registers.
    This extract of text (retrieve form Wikipedia) is only here to say that x86-64 (and POWER) have native 32-bits mode, so there is no performance hit when 32-bits programs run on 64-bits system. That's all.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Uqbar View Post
      Second, in a number of places you can read that a 64bit desktop PC is not that faster than a 32bit conterpart. If that's not a urban legend, it's at least a common belief none has cleared so far. So let's stay on the mainstream.
      Yup, but many of those articles are very outdated or benchmark 32-bit apps on a 64-bit OS.

      Fourth. People coming from the Microsoft world (that's not me) "know" that there "can be problems" in getting 64bit working drivers and software if they choose a 64bit OS.
      That may have been the case in 2005 when XP64 first came out. Many tried it when it first came out and many drivers were not readily available for it. A year later that changed and not being able to find a driver was an exception to the rule. Later when Vista came out that problem pretty much disappeared altogether.

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      • #18
        c'mon these charts can't be read. Slightly different shades of green sorted each time? Why can't the labels just show up inside the histograms themselves.

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        • #19
          Colorblind

          I'd like to add my complaint to the list. Those graphs are useless. I am red-green colorblind, so I frequently can't distinguish red from green, and I certainly can't tell green from green. Please use multiple contrasting colors for the graphs so I can tell which score goes with which test.

          Thanks.

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          • #20
            For those that don't like the colors, the color algorithm in pts_Graph and bilde_renderer can be improved. Patches welcome. Code at http://www.phoronix-test-suite.com/
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Michael View Post
              For those that don't like the colors, the color algorithm in pts_Graph and bilde_renderer can be improved. Patches welcome. Code at http://www.phoronix-test-suite.com/
              So does this mean you don't see the problem in the coloring? Or just that you don't know enough about the visible spectrum to know what colors to pick?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by fhuberts View Post
                Fedora has had multiarch since the 'beginning'.
                I love the way Fedora and other RPM distros handle multiarch. It's much better than Debian.

                Code:
                yum install $package.i686
                No fiddling around with weird package names like whatever Debian uses for 32-bit libs which isn't guaranteed to exist in the first place.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by locovaca View Post
                  So does this mean you don't see the problem in the coloring? Or just that you don't know enough about the visible spectrum to know what colors to pick?
                  I can see the difference in colors but this color is coming up with an automated color picker off of one base color by rotating it around the color wheel, shading, etc.

                  There's something not ideal right now in that code, but it's a low priority item for me to look into especially as I am not too much into colors and have more important work to do, so anyone that is more concerned about colors, patches are welcome.

                  phoronix-test-suite/pts-core/objects/bilde_renderer/bilde_renderer.php circa line 450 with color_cache() function is where it can probably best be worked on.
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                  • #24
                    64 bit kernel/32 bit userland

                    I'd be curious how a system with a 64 bit kernel and 32 bit userland does in these comparisons. I've been running a system like this for years and it works great. Seems like the perfect compromise to me.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by eikenberry View Post
                      I'd be curious how a system with a 64 bit kernel and 32 bit userland does in these comparisons. I've been running a system like this for years and it works great. Seems like the perfect compromise to me.
                      Is it simply installing an x86_64 kernel and modules while just keeping the 32 bit userland intact?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                        Is it simply installing an x86_64 kernel and modules while just keeping the 32 bit userland intact?
                        Yep. It's even a supported mode in Debian, IIRC.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Michael View Post
                          I can see the difference in colors but this color is coming up with an automated color picker off of one base color by rotating it around the color wheel, shading, etc.

                          There's something not ideal right now in that code, but it's a low priority item for me to look into especially as I am not too much into colors and have more important work to do, so anyone that is more concerned about colors, patches are welcome.

                          phoronix-test-suite/pts-core/objects/bilde_renderer/bilde_renderer.php circa line 450 with color_cache() function is where it can probably best be worked on.
                          You could pick colors at random and get much better results than the colors picked here.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                            Is it simply installing an x86_64 kernel and modules while just keeping the 32 bit userland intact?
                            Yes. That is all there is to it. I use Debian but unless Ubuntu really broke things it should work perfectly fine there as well.

                            One area where I've heard people had issues was with the fglrx (ati binary) driver. It's kernel module didn't like the setup for some reason. Not sure if it was a packaging issue or a bug with the driver itself, but something to watch out for.

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                            • #29
                              That's an unsupported combination because you need to build the kernel module for 64 bit and the userspace for 32 bit. Usually you need at least a 64 bit chroot to build the 64 bit kernel module in that case. That combination is only needed when you want to install/rescue a 64 bit system via chroot, there is no real good other use case for 64 bit kernel and 32 bit userspace. The things that gain speed are in the 64 bit userspace, the kernel is not that important.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Kano View Post
                                That's an unsupported combination because you need to build the kernel module for 64 bit and the userspace for 32 bit. Usually you need at least a 64 bit chroot to build the 64 bit kernel module in that case. That combination is only needed when you want to install/rescue a 64 bit system via chroot, there is no real good other use case for 64 bit kernel and 32 bit userspace. The things that gain speed are in the 64 bit userspace, the kernel is not that important.
                                As someone already pointed out, it is a supported setup on Debian. And all the modules build fine on the system as the required 64 bit libraries are installed. So I'm interpreting this as saying that Ubuntu breaks with Debian on this.

                                The use case is getting access to more memory w/o the PAE penalty while keeping compatibility with the 32bit binary only userland apps. I thought that would be pretty obvious from the context of this article.

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