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Ubuntu 10.10 Has Arrived On 10/10/2010

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  • #21
    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
    It should be obvious that you shouldn't enable this if you need a stable system and proper installations.

    Try filing a bug against xorg with [xorg-edgers] in the title.
    Did you actually read his posts, or are you just trolling?

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    • #22
      Originally posted by etnlWings View Post
      Did you actually read his posts, or are you just trolling?
      He expects closed-source graphics drivers to install properly after enabling and disabling xorg-edgers. This is not a realistic expectation. The xorg-edgers explicitly request bug reports on issues like this, so I suggested he file one.

      Those aren't the windmills you are looking for.

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      • #23
        Actually, being able to purge/'revert' a ppa is a pretty realistic expectation.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
          He expects closed-source graphics drivers to install properly after enabling and disabling xorg-edgers. This is not a realistic expectation. The xorg-edgers explicitly request bug reports on issues like this, so I suggested he file one.

          Those aren't the windmills you are looking for.
          Actually I don't expect much from the closed source driver at all. I'm currently downloading an Ubuntu iso to verify if hardware drivers actually works for me on a clean system (live CD). Then I might create a second partition for testing fglrx and keep xorg-edgers on this setup. Afterwards I might consider filing a bug report depending on the situation.

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          • #25
            Something thats really disaapointing is that the iso is half-ready to be a hybrid iso - the isolinux is new enough just isohybrid command was not executed on it. Of course you can install the syslinux package and execute isohybrid on the iso yourself. then you can dd it to your usb stick or use a frontend for this.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Kano View Post
              Something thats really disaapointing is that the iso is half-ready to be a hybrid iso - the isolinux is new enough just isohybrid command was not executed on it. Of course you can install the syslinux package and execute isohybrid on the iso yourself. then you can dd it to your usb stick or use a frontend for this.
              Indeed, that was rather disappointing. Still, tools for usb sticks are readily available so it's mostly a case of missing polish.

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              • #27
                Those tools use syslinux instead of hybrid mode. I wrote my own scripts to do that too, but as the installer is inside the iso it is a bit stupid...

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by gregzeng View Post
                  @Detructor "new harddrive" - what type: Momentus XT (with inbuilt SSD)?

                  @AnonymousCoward: EXPLAIN FURTHER to non-English people. "42" is the alleged secret to the universe, according to one science fiction movie.

                  What none seems to understand here is that Ubuntu is now a ROLLING release. If we have 100.04 systems, they should allow rolling upto 10.04.

                  Or do I misunderstand Ubuntu?

                  BTW: b4 EXT4 was the "standard", a complete re-install was needed to move from EXT3 to EXT4. So the claimed "rolling release" was not true.

                  Retired (medical) IT Consultant, Australian Capital Territory
                  it's a WD3200AAKS so no SSD (wondering how fast that would be...).

                  uhm there is no number like 100.04 (give it another 90 years, then you would've such a number). aposid (formely known as sidux) is a rolling release distribution. and no, you didn't needed to reinstall ubuntu for using ext4 https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Co...lesystemToExt4

                  what you meant is switching from one version to the next one without the need to reinstall and that is true, at least since 8.04. You can upgrade from one version to another (8.04 -> 8.10 -> 9.04 -> 9.10 -> 10.04) or directly from LTS to LTS (8.04 -> 10.04).

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by gregzeng View Post
                    What none seems to understand here is that Ubuntu is now a ROLLING release. If we have 100.04 systems, they should allow rolling upto 10.04.
                    A rolling release means that there are no releases, like in Arch or Gentoo. You simply install whatever versions are in the repositories and upgrade daily.

                    Ubuntu does not use rolling releases. It uses traditional releases every 6 months, like 10.10 followed 10.4.

                    BTW: b4 EXT4 was the "standard", a complete re-install was needed to move from EXT3 to EXT4. So the claimed "rolling release" was not true.
                    You could always upgrade an ext3 partition to ext4. It just meant that you lost a couple of advanced features of the filesystem.

                    Also, you do not need a complete re-install to change a filesystem, ever. Only a spare hard-disk and some advanced knowledge.

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                    • #30
                      Ubuntu 10.10 is okay once you do a bit of post installation tweaking. Rid it of the intrusive ubuntuone-client and remove some of the Novell crap (Mono, Evolution). Not that much different than 10.04.

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