Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is Fedora's Boot Time Increasing?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Is Fedora's Boot Time Increasing?

    Phoronix: Is Fedora's Boot Time Increasing?

    The last time we closely examined the boot performance of Fedora Linux was in 2008 when comparing the boot times from Fedora Core 4 through Fedora 8. However, with more distributions taking pride in recent months over shortening their boot time -- with Canonical for example having worked towards a ten second Ubuntu boot time -- we decided to see how long it's taking Fedora to put its hat on these days. With the three Intel notebooks we used from our recent Fedora power consumption review, we measured the boot times using Bootchart on the Fedora 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 Alpha releases.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=15316

  • #2
    Strange... SystemD should crush other inits... Maybe wait for the beta?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
      Strange... SystemD should crush other inits... Maybe wait for the beta?
      SystemD is not yet on by default.

      Comment


      • #4
        Too bad, but it's better to wait for SysD to become feature complete and stable.

        Realy something that I'm looking foward to; faster boot times, less/minimaly required RAM usage, more flexebility and self-healing stability.

        Comment


        • #5
          I stopped caring about boot times ever since I bought a SSD

          Comment


          • #6
            I think that systemd was initially slated for F14, but a few missing features held it back. It is currently in rawhide (F15) and its state is listed as "complete".

            In any case though, got to remember that these test systems are LAPTOPS, and not ones of particularly good performance. From personal experience, which involves a little bit of boot tweaking, F13 absolutely CRUSHES every previous version of Fedora, especially with an SSD. The SSD boot time of F13 is less than HALF the SSD boot time of, say, F10 on a 16GB AAO or a 32GB T91, both of which I have personally measured.

            I also note a major major reduction in boot time on my old luggable Turion/4GB/nvidia6100/160GB-pata from F9 to F13 didn't try anything in between since it wasn't an interesting machine until nouveau was in a decent and usable state. Mind you, I'm running 2.6.35 on it with some custom happiness . Boot time is way faster than its ever been.

            Comment


            • #7
              Boot time is irrelevant as long as it's faster than the amount of time to get a coffee. My machine takes forever just to get through the BIOS stuff, there's only so much to be done.

              That Fedora startup bug where they tried to initialize all the network cards all at once, triggering a race condition, that was just dandy.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                I think that systemd was initially slated for F14, but a few missing features held it back. It is currently in rawhide (F15) and its state is listed as "complete".
                I doubt they never planned for it to stay for F14 final. Probably just wanted people to test it in F14 alpha.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                  I doubt they never planned for it to stay for F14 final. Probably just wanted people to test it in F14 alpha.
                  Maybe in the back of someone's mind, but the whole planning and processing for the fedora project is really transparent. Just head over to lists.fedoraproject.org -- its all there. Crazy hard to find anything useful due to the sheer volume of it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think there were some issues with F14 having all services ready for systemd, so they moved it back. Which isn't uncommon.

                    One thing that would be worth checking; I believe default Fedora install has LVM layer on laptops, which have a single HDD.

                    Obviously for instances where a machine will only have a single drive, LVM is a bit redundant, also slows down start-up times a bit.

                    An install without LVM, and on SSD, as above posters have said, the boot times improve significantly.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X