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Did Ubuntu 10.04 Achieve Its Ten Second Boot Goal?

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  • Did Ubuntu 10.04 Achieve Its Ten Second Boot Goal?

    Phoronix: Did Ubuntu 10.04 Achieve Its Ten Second Boot Goal?

    Canonical expressed their plans to achieve a ten-second boot time in June of last year for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, with their reference system being a Dell Mini 9 netbook. In February, we last checked on Ubuntu's boot performance and found it close, but not quite there yet, but did they end up hitting this goal for the final release of the Lucid Lynx? Well, from our tests, not quite. We tested out a near-final version of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS on three netbooks -- including a Dell Mini 9 -- and the boot speed is not quite in the single digits.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=14863

  • #2
    9.50 seconds on my desktop with a HDD

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    • #3
      The article did mention that desktops are likely to boot faster, and also gave the reference that Ubuntu was using for the 10s mark.
      Nice article - I must remember to look into my own machine's boot sequence (I use Gentoo) to see if I can't optimise it a little.

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      • #4
        it would have been goo if you had also look at a fedora boot time and default Debian.

        Id say the job is done for now and that ubuntu should now focus on getting the battery life to improve.

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        • #5
          Do you know how to achieve this boot speed boost on updated *ubuntu? I'm using Kubuntu 10.04 (reinstalled a year ago as 9.04, then upgraded to 9.10 and later 10.04). But it looks after upgrade initrd is keept that 9.04 adapted to new version with module updates (no boot speed improvements after upgrade). Maybe there could be used clean initrd from cd?

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          • #6
            Boots pretty quickly on my desktop, but it can't log into KDE. First attempt to log in returns me to the login screen and the second attempt locks the system up. But I can log in in console and startx from there. Also, after inastalling the nvidia drivers, the startup screen looks like 640x480x8... Looks to me like this release got a lot of things wrong.

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            • #7
              ubuntu 10.04 on my EEE 1201N (with a replaced hdd to a SSD Intel 40GB X25-V G2) boots on about 5 seconds

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              • #8
                Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                Phoronix: Did Ubuntu 10.04 Achieve Its Ten Second Boot Goal?

                Canonical expressed their plans to achieve a ten-second boot time in June of last year for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, with their reference system being a Dell Mini 9 netbook. In February, we last checked on Ubuntu's boot performance and found it close, but not quite there yet, but did they end up hitting this goal for the final release of the Lucid Lynx? Well, from our tests, not quite. We tested out a near-final version of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS on three netbooks -- including a Dell Mini 9 -- and the boot speed is not quite in the single digits.

                http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=14863
                Gentoo on my laptop with a first generation OCZ 64GB SLC SSD (it lacks trim) boots in roughly 15 seconds according to my stop watch. If you ignore the BIOS, GRUB and the kernel boot and measure only userland, which appears to be what Phoronix is doing, it probably is more like 5 to 10 seconds.

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                • #9
                  Even the 9.10 boot times are way lower then what I currently see in my eee pc 1000H with Fedora 10 (more than 2 minutes). 23 seconds on the HDD netbook seem excelent to me! Looks like it's about time to upgrade to something a little more recent.

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                  • #10
                    Once again you forgot that ubuntu 9.10 bootchart adds 45 seconds to bootchart.

                    So your analysis is once again wrong. I pointed this out last time you did bootchart analysis.

                    Bootchart between 9.04, 9.10, 10.04 all measure using different stop times so you can not compare any of them.

                    10.04 stops once it is idle after gnome-panel loads.

                    http://changelogs.ubuntu.com/changel....2-7/changelog
                    * Crop the chart down to the first idle period after gnome-panel has
                    started. November 29, 2009

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