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CentOS 5.4 vs. OpenSuSE 11.2 vs. Ubuntu 9.10 Benchmarks

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  • #16
    Originally posted by energyman View Post
    well, extX devs only care about good benchmark results. So the 'defaults' are 'fast but very insecure'. AKA completly moronic.

    A dsitro using 'just defaults' might look better on paper, but puts your data at risk. A completly idiotic behaviour.

    Seriously, using extX (2,3,4) with default ops says 'I don't care about data. Just pretty numbers'.

    Another reason, why ext4 should have never become stable in the first place.
    Hmm? I never changed the defaults on Gentoo and I get "barrier=1,data=ordered".

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    • #17
      At least in the desktop, Mandriva is one of the fastest. Since the Server version is based on the Desktop version plus server specifics, I imagine that the Mandriva Corporate Server is probably one of the fastest if not The fastest.
      Any way we cold be sure if Phoronix do the same tests with it and add the results to the comparison.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by EthraZa View Post
        At least in the desktop, Mandriva is one of the fastest. Since the Server version is based on the Desktop version plus server specifics, I imagine that the Mandriva Corporate Server is probably one of the fastest if not The fastest.
        Any way we cold be sure if Phoronix do the same tests with it and add the results to the comparison.

        Not sure where you get the idea of Mandriva being "one of the fastest". Previous versions actually show it to be one of the slowest on a fairly consistent basis.

        Do not confuse the loading of a gui with over all system speed.

        http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...four_way&num=1

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        • #19
          Originally posted by deanjo View Post
          Can you please list which kernel you were using for the server/workstation benchmarks for openSUSE 11.2?

          There are two flavors,

          -desktop (which is optimized and configured for desktop use)
          -default (which optimized and configured for workstation/server use)

          By default openSUSE 11.2 will install the desktop kernel so unless it was changed from the default install you would have had the 2.6.31-desktop kernel installed when running your tests.

          PING! Inquiring minds want to know....

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          • #20
            Originally posted by deanjo View Post
            Barriers enabled does seem to have quite an effect with SQLite. You might want to check that as well. IIRC though (K)ubuntu does not have it enabled where openSUSE does.
            I'd want to, but SQLite benchmark doesn't work properly here. It looks like it's caught in some loop and it doesn't want to finish. I ran it using Ext4 and default settings. Pgbench works fine.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by kraftman View Post
              I'd want to, but SQLite benchmark doesn't work properly here. It looks like it's caught in some loop and it doesn't want to finish. I ran it using Ext4 and default settings. Pgbench works fine.
              Well according to the article it can take ~ 15 minutes to finish on Ubuntu/opensuse.

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              • #22
                openSUSE, not openSuSE

                I really like this site and I read it almost every day as it always brings a wealth of good information concerning desktop linux. One thing that always makes me cringe is when Michael uses the term "openSuSE." It is either SUSE Linux or openSUSE, there is no "openSuSE." If you are referring to historical naming, there is S.u.S.E, but that was changed SuSE in 1998 and then was changed to SUSE in 2003. The openSUSE project was announced in 2005 and has never once used the old SuSE casing in its branding. So with 6 years since the casing was changed and 4 years since openSUSE was announced, Michael still gets it wrong? Is he just ignorant of the name change or just doesn't care?

                So please, next time you write up an article about openSUSE, please use the correct casing. It will make you look more professional and it's much easier to type to boot!

                p.s. I gleaned all the dates from Wikipedia as I can't remember all the dates. (I'm not that big of a SUSE nut!)

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