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Ubuntu 9.10 Off To A Great Performance Start

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  • Ubuntu 9.10 Off To A Great Performance Start

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 9.10 Off To A Great Performance Start

    The first alpha release for Ubuntu 9.10 was made available yesterday and while it does net yet integrate Plymouth or any other new features, it has picked up a few new packages. Most prominently, Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 1 features the Linux 2.6.30 kernel and GCC 4.4. There are also other updated packages from Debian like GNOME 2.27, but most notable are the kernel and compiler updates. We have tested out Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 1 and compared its performance to Ubuntu 9.04. While this is very early within the Ubuntu 9.10 development cycle, the results already may come as a surprise.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13833

  • #2
    Pretty nice results - could you say are they more due to GCC 4.4 or 2.6.30?

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    • #3
      It would be interesting to isolate whether these speedups come from the new kernel, or the new gcc, or something else.

      I'm guessing most of it is the new kernel.

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      • #4
        Great to see the Kernel devs making an effort to improve the desktop experience ... makes me tempted to upgrade to the 2.6.30 kernel on Jaunty (not sure if thats possible)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bugmenot View Post
          Great to see the Kernel devs making an effort to improve the desktop experience ... makes me tempted to upgrade to the 2.6.30 kernel on Jaunty (not sure if thats possible)
          All:http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/

          Linux 2.6.30 RC5: http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa...e/v2.6.30-rc5/

          Warning: may make your kitteh eat a dog.

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          • #6
            Guess that kind of proves how screwed SQLite performance was because of a kernel regression.

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            • #7
              The third test says
              Code:
              We had run the other tests within the compilation suite found in the Phoronix Test Suite too, and in every case Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 1 / GCC 4.4 were faster. With that said, we next moved onto looking at a compression speed test. 7-Zip compression was 4% faster with the Karmic Koala packages compared to the Jaunty Jackalope.
              Should say Ubuntu 9.10

              Just a minor glitch in the matrix i found while crusing on my favorite website.

              100% addicted to Phoronix chems.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by deanjo View Post
                Guess that kind of proves how screwed SQLite performance was because of a kernel regression.
                Ehm, same 'regression' on Linux, *BSD and Solaris?

                I still hope we'll see Ubuntu x86_64 on Ext 4 partition vs Macos comparison.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                  Ehm, same 'regression' on Linux, *BSD and Solaris?

                  I still hope we'll see Ubuntu x86_64 on Ext 4 partition vs Macos comparison.
                  Same here mate!

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                  • #10
                    very nice performance gains

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                      Ehm, same 'regression' on Linux, *BSD and Solaris?

                      I still hope we'll see Ubuntu x86_64 on Ext 4 partition vs Macos comparison.
                      +1 (also with some tweaks)

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                      • #12
                        and while it does NOT yet
                        Typo on the first sentence.

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                        • #13
                          I am guessing it might be a Core-i7 thing - may be new kernel and gcc are more optimized for it. Would be very surprised if that's the case for E8400 too, since the Core2 architecture has been around for quite a while. Pretty happy anyways .

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                          • #14
                            Ok, so since everyone is trying to guess here, I'll try my guess too:

                            Could the performance improvements (they are most notable in I/O operations) be due to changing the default in ext3 from date=ordered to data=writeback? In other words, anyone could have enjoyed these improvements years ago, as long as they don't care about a few safety/security problems when mounting the filesystem with data=writeback.

                            Well, at least one of those safety problems have been addressed so you won't get zeroed files if a crash happens just after a file is renamed/replaced by a program that does not use sync. Still, you might get files from other users (or other users can get files belonging to you).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Luis View Post
                              Ok, so since everyone is trying to guess here, I'll try my guess too:

                              Could the performance improvements (they are most notable in I/O operations) be due to changing the default in ext3 from date=ordered to data=writeback? In other words, anyone could have enjoyed these improvements years ago, as long as they don't care about a few safety/security problems when mounting the filesystem with data=writeback.

                              Well, at least one of those safety problems have been addressed so you won't get zeroed files if a crash happens just after a file is renamed/replaced by a program that does not use sync. Still, you might get files from other users (or other users can get files belonging to you).
                              Not sure but the regression happened around the 2.6.18 time frame. It's just now that Ext3 finally starts performing like it did back then.

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