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Ubuntu 9.04 Receives EXT4 Support

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  • #11
    I read somewhere that MySQL performance was much improved with ext4 - does PTS have any MySQL or PostgreSQL benchmarks?

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    • #12
      This test will probably affect what fs I will format my newly cleared 250 gb disk to. Although speed of the fs is a concern I am also concerned about being able to put the drive to sleep. Currently I have mounted my ext3 disks as ext2 so the journal wont be written every 5 sec which makes it impossible to put them to sleep with hdparm -Y /dev/sdX

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      • #13
        Could you please test random write performance? The tested ssd has horrible (re)write-latencies, and filesystems can have a significant impact on that(the more small writes, the worse).
        Mine's currently running udf...

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        • #14
          Already in Fedora 10, coming in RHEL5.3

          Ext4 was released in Fedora 10, and will also be released as a tech preview with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3.

          You act like Ubuntu is trailblazing here.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by kgonzales View Post
            Ext4 was released in Fedora 10, and will also be released as a tech preview with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3.

            You act like Ubuntu is trailblazing here.
            That is total BS, he did benchmarks before with fedora 9, and even mentioned that fedora had it in their distro well before ubuntu did.

            "While the EXT4 file-system was marked as "ext4dev" within the kernel to signify its development status, Red Hat has been shipping EXT4 as an install-time option since Fedora 9. This support has continued into Fedora 10 with the newest kernel components. When installing Fedora, to create an EXT4 file-system you must append "ext4" to the boot line when starting the Anaconda installer. Beyond the Fedora option, EXT4 has yet to find itself as an option in many distribution installers."
            http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...nchmarks&num=1

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            • #16
              I'm excited about Solaris ZFS. Wonder how that would stack up.

              Surprising how poorly EXT3 did.

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              • #17
                i question the accuracy of benchmarks with these OCZ drives considering problems documented at http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets...spx?i=3403&p=8

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                • #18
                  Where can I download the ISO that was used here?
                  (Preferably Kubuntu)

                  Right now I'm using Alpha 2 alternate installer and it doesn't have ext4.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by clickwir View Post
                    Where can I download the ISO that was used here?
                    (Preferably Kubuntu)

                    Right now I'm using Alpha 2 alternate installer and it doesn't have ext4.
                    http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/daily-live/current/

                    You could also wait for Alpha 3 which is arriving tomorrow, but tere shouldn't be any changes to this one really.

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                    • #20
                      what about data=writeback ? was that used during tests ?

                      These options could noticeably affect performance.

                      From Documentation/filesystems/ext4.txt

                      - When comparing performance with other filesystems, remember that
                      ext3/4 by default offers higher data integrity guarantees than most.
                      So when comparing with a metadata-only journalling filesystem, such
                      as ext3, use `mount -o data=writeback'.
                      And you might as well use
                      `mount -o nobh' too along with it. Making the journal larger than
                      the mke2fs default often helps performance with metadata-intensive
                      workloads.

                      * writeback mode
                      In data=writeback mode, ext4 does not journal data at all. This mode provides a similar level of journaling as that of XFS, JFS, and ReiserFS in its default mode - metadata journaling. A crash+recovery can cause incorrect data to appear in files which were written shortly before the crash. This mode will typically provide the best ext4 performance.

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