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Free COMPILERS and CROSS-COMPILERS for Linux and Windows.

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  • #21
    Maybe it is called different for other platforms, no idea. I only use that way to find packages.

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    • #22
      http://packages.debian.org/search?su...&keywords=ecj1

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      • #23
        What I really needed to know, was this:

        --with-ecj-jar=filename

        This option can be used to specify the location of an external jar file containing the Eclipse Java compiler. A specially modified version of this compiler is used by gcj to parse .java source files. If this option is given, the `libjava' build will create and install an ecj1 executable which uses this jar file at runtime.

        If this option is not given, but an ecj.jar file is found in the topmost source tree at configure time, then the `libgcj' build will create and install ecj1, and will also install the discovered ecj.jar into a suitable place in the install tree.

        If ecj1 is not installed, then the user will have to supply one on his path in order for gcj to properly parse .java source files. A suitable jar is available from ftp://sourceware.org/pub/java/.

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        • #24
          Anyone know how to get the multilib libraries to install in

          /usr/local/lib32 and /usr/local/lib

          rather than

          /usr/local/lib32 and /usr/local/lib64

          (on an amd64 box)

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          • #25
            I have tracked the settings down to this file:

            gcc-4.3.0/gcc/config/i386/t-linux64

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Jade View Post
              I have tracked the settings down to this file:

              gcc-4.3.0/gcc/config/i386/t-linux64
              You need to change the line (in the file gcc-4.3.0/gcc/config/i386/t-linux64):

              MULTILIB_OSDIRNAMES = ../lib64 $(if $(wildcard $(shell echo $(SYSTEM_HEADER_DIR))/../../usr/lib32),../lib32,../lib)

              to:

              MULTILIB_OSDIRNAMES = ../lib $(if $(wildcard $(shell echo $(SYSTEM_HEADER_DIR))/../../usr/lib32),../lib32,../lib)

              or (making things more explicit):

              MULTILIB_OSDIRNAMES = ../lib ../lib32

              Probably, this will work as well:

              MULTILIB_OSDIRNAMES = . ../lib32

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              • #27
                note that the:

                Code:
                ./configure --build=x86_64-linux-gnu \ 
                            --host=x86_64-linux-gnu \ 
                            --target=-x86_64-mingw32
                in the main article, should have been:

                Code:
                ./configure --build=x86_64-linux-gnu \ 
                            --host=x86_64-linux-gnu \ 
                            --target=i686-pc-mingw32
                I've changed it.

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                • #28
                  Free Compilers and Cross-Compilers for Linux and Windows for GCC 4.3.0

                  http://linuxhelp.150m.com/compile/gc...-compilers.htm

                  The project above (with GCC 4.2.3) has been carried out for GCC 4.3.0 and what works and what doesn't reported.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by Jade View Post
                    Free Compilers and Cross-Compilers for Linux and Windows for GCC 4.3.0

                    http://linuxhelp.150m.com/compile/gc...-compilers.htm

                    The project above (with GCC 4.2.3) has been carried out for GCC 4.3.0 and what works and what doesn't reported.
                    Did you ever consider writing a script which does all of the steps you so neatly
                    outlined in your previous posts? Preferably with configurable CHOST and CTARGET
                    tuples and maybe let it apply custom patches from a separate directory (e.g. for fixes
                    straight from binutils/gcc bugtrackers).

                    As I mentioned in another post I use cross-compilers generated with Gentoo's crossdev, but those don't integrate well into other distros. I'd love to have an easy way to
                    (re)generate newer cross-toolchain versions for non-Gentoo systems (for customers
                    who don't want Gentoo)

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by mlau View Post
                      Did you ever consider writing a script which does all of the steps you so neatly
                      outlined in your previous posts?
                      There is a script for GCC 4.3.2 which can easily be modified by those interested.

                      The aim is to not make it any more complicated than it already is.

                      Adding lots of complications in a "teaching article" is just silly.

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