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Open-Source Blu-Ray Now Works For BD-J / Menu Rendering

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  • Open-Source Blu-Ray Now Works For BD-J / Menu Rendering

    Phoronix: Open-Source Blu-Ray Now Works For BD-J / Menu Rendering

    For users of libbluray for limited open-source Blu-Ray disc support, there's some updates worth fetching...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc0Mzk

  • #2
    Well, nice of them to do that.

    Now i can only wonder when the 3D BR technology will be outsourced too. I am trying my best to replace all sorts of gimmicks with my Linux powered machine but i am currently stuck at 3D BluRays. Or maybe i wasnt able to figure the solution if one is still available.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by araxth View Post
      I am trying my best to replace all sorts of gimmicks with my Linux powered machine but i am currently stuck at 3D BluRays.
      http://wiki.xbmc.org/index.php?title=3D

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      • #4
        Who still uses discs?
        Xbmc plays all my hdd matroska files.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by amagnoni View Post
          Who still uses discs?
          Xbmc plays all my hdd matroska files.
          Example: Those who actually pay for the media content and cannot be bothered with the ripping operation.

          To make the things worst, xbmc cannot play the original 3D content. It has to be ripped and converted to SBS or other alternates.

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          • #6
            So only MKVs SBS or Top And Bottom 3D. I meant the original 3D BluRay.


            THanks though
            n.

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            • #7
              Blu ray was so poorly executed. It had so much potential to be in frequent use but companies like Sony had to make it such an expensive format. The prices of Blu Ray drives and discs today are what they should have been when the products were first released. Blu Ray easily has the potential to be the most cost effective form of backups and mass storage, but with hard drives being faster, cheaper, and having much higher capacities, Blu Ray has quickly become obsoleted. In a way it's a little sad to see optical discs being phased out - does get me to wonder why the new-gen consoles even bothered to support them.

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              • #8
                Who needs blu-rays? If you want legal content just buy it online if possible. If it is not possible for some reason (e.g. not provided for your platform or sold only on disks) then with a clear conscience you can download pirate version. If copyright holders don't want to sell it to you then it is their fault.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Szzz View Post
                  Who needs blu-rays? If you want legal content just buy it online if possible. If it is not possible for some reason (e.g. not provided for your platform or sold only on disks) then with a clear conscience you can download pirate version. If copyright holders don't want to sell it to you then it is their fault.
                  Blu Ray is ideal for people who don't have high-speed internet, and people who prefer having physical backups. I personally am a little wary of online services, because if ANYTHING happens to them, you'll never get your content back. This is possibly the only thing that seriously bothers me about Steam - you're actually renting the games indefinitely, but you don't actually ever own them. So if anything happens to Valve, you just lost all those games.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Szzz View Post
                    Who needs blu-rays? If you want legal content just buy it online if possible. If it is not possible for some reason (e.g. not provided for your platform or sold only on disks) then with a clear conscience you can download pirate version. If copyright holders don't want to sell it to you then it is their fault.
                    Depends where you live, in Germany for instance the clear conscience doesn't save you from the fine you will have to pay for media stuff illegal downloading. And I assume it's the case for the civilized world.

                    But this thread goes out of topic. Back to the matter at hand, we don't have full (as in complete) support for BR technology in Linux. And that's simply something that the community has to work at. So far it appears that people are actually working at it, one piece at the time. What i am afraid of is that the work will be complete only when the BR will become history.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                      Blu Ray is ideal for people who don't have high-speed internet, and people who prefer having physical backups. I personally am a little wary of online services, because if ANYTHING happens to them, you'll never get your content back. This is possibly the only thing that seriously bothers me about Steam - you're actually renting the games indefinitely, but you don't actually ever own them. So if anything happens to Valve, you just lost all those games.
                      I am not really sure about the legal part (i am not a lawyer) but i assume it's pretty much legal to backup your steam downloaded files locally.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by araxth View Post
                        I am not really sure about the legal part (i am not a lawyer) but i assume it's pretty much legal to backup your steam downloaded files locally.
                        It is legal to do that, but it doesn't matter if it requires the Steam client in order to play them.

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                        • #13
                          Law enforcement is easily defeated in the world of computers

                          Originally posted by araxth View Post
                          Depends where you live, in Germany for instance the clear conscience doesn't save you from the fine you will have to pay for media stuff illegal downloading. And I assume it's the case for the civilized world.
                          The risk of something like this is close to zero in the US, the very nation behind all the copyright and patent maximalization. My advice is this: refuse to pay for any content due to the behavior of the paid content authors. If you can't get it free, reject it. Use Tor for website work, and peer to peer darknets for torrenting that work like Tor but unlike Bittorrent over Tor don't broadcast your true IP address to fellow uploaders/downloaders . Even if exploits exist capable of bypassing these measures, your government won't admit to having them over filesharing, for fear of tipping off bigger fish.

                          Refuse to pay fines, refuse to pay judgements-be ruthless in dealing with the copythug mafia! Dispose of any equipment or services requiring offical permission to own or operate. Here in the US, the RIAA was reported to have been unable to collect one thin dime from all those high-profile filesharing lawsuits and gave up. So many people stopped buying CD's because of the music lawsuits that the music industry suffered a huge economic punishment for the lawsuits. As for fines, the FCC has had almost zero success in collecting fines from individuals (not corporations) accused of running pirate radio stations, surely a bigger deal than filesharing. The fines for radio violations are collected by suspending radio licenses-but pirates are not licensed and have nothing to lose, like a cyclist refusing to pay a red light ticket because he has no driver license to hold hostage.

                          You are going to need Tor anyway because European governments are getting so interested in Internet censorship, and because the TTIP trade deal, if it goes through, will clamp US patent and copyright laws around your throat. Tor and similar tools can poke out the Eye of Sauron and keep your activity concealed from the greedheads in Hollywood. I'd like to see the entire paid media industry bankrupt, so all the independent musicians, news reporters (like myself) and filmmakers would finally be able to operate on a level playing field. The Big bosses are the enemy, so roll up your sleeves for a good fight!

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                          • #14
                            Well, blu-ray still has a use. 50 gb rewritable por 5-6 pounds is really good. Dropping a blu-ray is not the same as dropping a hard disk.
                            Flash devices are more expensive.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                              It is legal to do that, but it doesn't matter if it requires the Steam client in order to play them.
                              I think somewhere in the terms of use it says that if ever Valve were to be unable to provide Steam service (because they went bankrupt or whatever), they would allow everyone to play their games without Steam activation. IIRC.

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