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In Road To Qt, Audacious Switches From GTK3 Back To GTK2

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  • #11
    I'm really conflicted. On the one hand, I love the direction they're going but, on the other hand, they removed support for sending MIDI output to my Yamaha PSR-E413 not to long ago (FluidSynth-only now) and the whole reason I use Audacious is to play all my esoteric formats in the same playlist.

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    • #12
      I remember when everyone though that GTK3 was teh awesome for the lone reason of it representing a version number bump. Immediately GTK2 was stricken as old and obsolete and unusable, blah blah.

      It'd be good if everything just moved to Qt at this point.

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      • #13
        What is the point of another qt based music player? At least Clementine and Amarok should cover all the bases (the former for traditional music playing with all the network features, the latter for music browsing). It is kind of like how I'm not a fan of OpenShot porting to Qt when Kdenlive exists. It is completely redundant.

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        • #14
          A few examples of non-traditional design choices: monochrome icons (or none at all), client-side window decorations, and message windows mimicking Android.
          /me not understanding...

          What monochrome icons? Isn't that, what icon themes are for?

          Client side window decorations are optional, AFAIK. Yet, they allow greater flexibility for the application designer.

          Android message windows?

          Furthermore, using some #ifdefs and a few build system tweaks, a gtk3 app should compile as gtk2 app.

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          • #15
            Anybody knows any tablet with gnome 3 in it? I would like to know if at least all those decissions they've made are worth anything.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by hungerfish View Post
              funny reading this. Until now, I wasn't aware that they wanted to port to Qt. Going back to gtk2 for stability makes some sense, as gtk2 is as stable as it's going to get!
              I've been a long time audacious user but recently switched away from it, preferring qt programs with my kde desktop.
              Until audacious makes 'the right' switch toolkit-wise, I guess it wouldn't be wrong to link to http://qmmp.ylsoftware.com/.
              Qmmp is like audacious, at least it support the classic winamp interface styles and does what it says on the box - play music!
              if i understood correctly, stability was not the problem. i wrote (or b1tched about it, pure matter of choice) about troubles when making gtk3 cross platform application more than few times here. your application simply looks and works in no consistent way as system it is running on, unless you run gnome

              sad fact is "gtk+ is not gtk+, at least not even close to mission statement on gtk.org". in some parts, it is completely bastardized version of some insane gnome design decisions. and unlike old gtk+, where gnome specific things were separated, gtk3 includes some gnome insanities in its core, where old cross compatible things are getting tagged as deprecated

              although, it is worth mentioning. last statements from gtk devs were more positive (fixing some most outstanding bugs for cp development, finally road to stable 4...), bit too late though. and unless they change their plans a little, they might have lost those last developers that are still using it for non gnome. whole road to 4 seems perfect until you read that scene graph is blocker for release 4. gtk never come close to it, way off to have it finalized with good design/api/functionalities. suddenly 4 is reaaaaally faaaaaaar away. if they added it as unstable separate lib of gtk4 and worked on it while 4 is online, they could get both. faster 4 release and more time to work on scene graph. but, longer the time they take, more developers will simply start using qt

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              • #17
                Originally posted by alazar View Post
                Anybody knows any tablet with gnome 3 in it? I would like to know if at least all those decissions they've made are worth anything.
                They are worth it, on the desktop, which is where you use it. Not without exceptions though.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by justmy2cents View Post
                  although, it is worth mentioning. last statements from gtk devs were more positive (fixing some most outstanding bugs for cp development, finally road to stable 4...), bit too late though. and unless they change their plans a little, they might have lost those last developers that are still using it for non gnome. whole road to 4 seems perfect until you read that scene graph is blocker for release 4. gtk never come close to it, way off to have it finalized with good design/api/functionalities. suddenly 4 is reaaaaally faaaaaaar away. if they added it as unstable separate lib of gtk4 and worked on it while 4 is online, they could get both. faster 4 release and more time to work on scene graph. but, longer the time they take, more developers will simply start using qt
                  I wasn't able to read much of what you said, but the last bit about QT adoption... kind of strikes me as a good thing. I'm sick of the toolkit split.

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                  • #19
                    Drop audacious and use QMMP!

                    Once upon a time wrote for QMMP output plugins JACK and OSS.

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                    • #20
                      I don't know what's wrong with gtk-3 based Audacious... It looks fine for me. I use GTK interface, but Winamp interface also seems to look fine.

                      Gtk2 is a bit faster and more stable on Windows. Though I sometimes use current pygobject (gtk3 for python) on windows and it's IMO acceptable. On linux I don't have any issues with gtk3.

                      It's also strange that they are switching from recently ported gtk3 to gtk2, and they are going to switch to qt... Not sure if they really know what they want...

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