Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

In Road To Qt, Audacious Switches From GTK3 Back To GTK2

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by talvik View Post
    According to Gtk developers, I'm not supposed to use another theme.
    And I've tried other theme and it broke in a minor release and than again... the theme developer gave up and so did I.

    https://igurublog.wordpress.com/2012...ing-in-threes/
    I'm pretty sure what they were saying was "you're not supposed to use another theme on Gnome", unified user experience and blabla. They really don't care what you do on other platforms. If that wasn't the case, why would they implement so much arduous code in GTK3 to make it completely stylable from CSS sheets?

    Originally posted by stqn View Post
    ExactlyÖ Gtk3 has no decent (dark) theme, anyone making a theme for Gtk3 at this point must be mad. Gtk3 also has intentionally broken scrollbars, makes window borders disappear on non-gnome3 desktops, broken client-side decorations, and a crappy file selector.

    Firefox has been a pain since FF4, but itís getting worse and worse, and I think Gtk3 will be the final nail in the coffin. (Kinda off-topic :P)
    I really wish the Xfce team would have done a proper GTK3 port of their "Dusk" theme, that's the best dark GTK2 theme I've ever know and I've been using it for years.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Ancurio View Post
      I really wish the Xfce team would have done a proper GTK3 port of their "Dusk" theme, that's the best dark GTK2 theme I've ever know and I've been using it for years.
      Iíve used Dusk for a long while, then switched to Drakfire Black Mod, then to Mediterranean Night in order to have a Gtk3 version of the theme. Unfortunately Mediterranean Night doesnít show arrows on the scrollbars. Itís ok overwise.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Ancurio View Post
        I'm pretty sure what they were saying was "you're not supposed to use another theme on Gnome", unified user experience and blabla. They really don't care what you do on other platforms. If that wasn't the case, why would they implement so much arduous code in GTK3 to make it completely stylable from CSS sheets?
        No, it's pretty clear that:
        -They don't care if themes breaks between minor release
        -It doesn't matter if they break, because "I am really concerned about this effort to encourage and sanction themes and extensions.", "The point is that it decreases our brand presence", "I guess you have to decide if you are a GNOME app, an Ubuntu app, or an XFCE app "

        For example the theme used by the guy below, was last updated for 3.8 in 2013. No fixes/update for 3.10 or 3.12.
        So you end up like this guy, jumping from theme to theme between every point release:
        http://www.reddit.com/r/gnome/commen...ctually_works/

        Comment


        • Originally posted by talvik View Post
          No, it's pretty clear that:
          -They don't care if themes breaks between minor release
          -It doesn't matter if they break, because "I am really concerned about this effort to encourage and sanction themes and extensions.", "The point is that it decreases our brand presence", "I guess you have to decide if you are a GNOME app, an Ubuntu app, or an XFCE app "

          For example the theme used by the guy below, was last updated for 3.8 in 2013. No fixes/update for 3.10 or 3.12.
          So you end up like this guy, jumping from theme to theme between every point release:
          http://www.reddit.com/r/gnome/commen...ctually_works/
          > "I guess you have to decide if you are a GNOME app, an Ubuntu app, or an XFCE app "

          This quote has nothing to do with styles/themes; please read the actual blog post before you start pulling quotes out of context. (Hint: This was about the system tray icon vs Ubuntu's AppIndicator)

          Comment


          • I use a GTK2 theme I ported myself with few issues

            Originally posted by talvik View Post
            According to Gtk developers, I'm not supposed to use another theme.
            And I've tried other theme and it broke in a minor release and than again... the theme developer gave up and so did I.

            https://igurublog.wordpress.com/2012...ing-in-threes/
            Some years ago I ported a slightly modified version of the circa 2008 UbuntuStudio GTK2 theme to GTK3. It has to be updated from time to time to deal with GTK3 changes, but never took me more than a day or two, and opening Gedit from terminal usually gave me warnings of what was broken, sometimes even with line numbers in the css sheets. The theme is very, very close to the GTK2 version of the same theme. Latest update is to move certain "symbolic" icons needed by Cinnamon into the package so the entire directory of them can be removed from the "gnome" icon theme. That's the only way I have found so far (with help from others on this thread-thanks!) to keep symbolic icons that render black when on a white background from replacing my normal icons in the gtk-file-chooser's sidebar. The "places" and "devices" directories must not contain a "symbolic" subdirectory in the theme, and the entire "scalable" directory in gnome must not exist. If only the icons are missing, you get a missing icon indicator. If the directories are gone, you get normal icons as fallbacks-for now. There is also supposedly a way to modify an SVG icon in Inkscape (by removing "stroke" support) so GTK can't lighten and darken it, don't know if that works as I have not tested it.

            Why are there so few GTK3 themes and so much complaining if I, someone with zero prior experience with CSS, was able to take color values from Ubuntustudio, drop them into Adwaita from GNOME 3.0, make other necessary modifications to make it look like Hardy-era UbuntuStudio, then maintain this through every GTK release since then with no more effort and breakage than that otherwise expected from running Ubuntu alphas on production machines?

            Comment


            • They really could fix lots of these theme problems, this isn't a new thing

              I just don't understand why couldn't make a wrapper interface like XCB did for Xlib, then very few would hate it and switch to QT in frustration. Then the projects could slowly re-implement things in the more modern API, and get the benefits provided by that change. In addition such a wrapper would by definition theme GTK2 with the GTK3 engines and respective GTK3 themes. They are very much responsible for the degradation of visual integration, and this is from a GTK supporter, and generally C++ avoider. I understand the ideological reasons for forcing that change immediately, but it's bad policy in the GPL community considering we don't often have the resources of commercial projects.

              Comment

              Working...
              X