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  • LibreOffice 4.3 In Beta, Bringing Good Improvements

    Phoronix: LibreOffice 4.3 In Beta, Bringing Good Improvements

    The beta release of LibreOffice 4.3 is available this week with many new features being under development for this popular open-source office suite...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY5OTY

  • #2
    Just in case you are wondering why a paragraph with 2^16=65535 characters exist:

    The portuguese legal tradition requires ~all their documents being written without paragraph breaks -- and this tradition radiated out to other countries, most importantly: all of Brazil.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mufasa72 View Post
      Just in case you are wondering why a paragraph with 2^16=65535 characters exist:

      The portuguese legal tradition requires ~all their documents being written without paragraph breaks -- and this tradition radiated out to other countries, most importantly: all of Brazil.
      Not trying to be culturally insensitive but... What. The. Fsck?! Why?! That seems like itd be editorial torture, not to mention masochistic for the writer

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ericg View Post
        Not trying to be culturally insensitive but... What. The. Fsck?! Why?! That seems like itd be editorial torture, not to mention masochistic for the writer
        Beats the hell out of me. Here's the reference: https://plus.google.com/111111739548...ts/GDXKZq53BSW

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ericg View Post
          Not trying to be culturally insensitive but... What. The. Fsck?! Why?! That seems like itd be editorial torture, not to mention masochistic for the writer
          People adapt to anything. Maybe there are other orthographic rules designed to counter the seemingly unorganized view of the paragraph-less text.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mufasa72 View Post
            The portuguese legal tradition requires ~all their documents being written without paragraph breaks
            My bet is that it was used at the time where kings in middle ages have given no more than 2-3 sentences about the given subject where writing it in one paragraph might have made sense and obviously no one predicted country would be subject to the European Union bureaucracy

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ericg View Post
              Not trying to be culturally insensitive but... What. The. Fsck?! Why?! That seems like itd be editorial torture, not to mention masochistic for the writer
              We have to deal with things like these all the time: think about English spelling. It is beyond broken, and a real nuisance to native and non-native speakers.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by froyo View Post
                We have to deal with things like these all the time: think about English spelling. It is beyond broken, and a real nuisance to native and non-native speakers.
                I wonder what makes you say that. English is not my native language, but it has been the easiest language to learn. Even poor and uneducated indian children learn english. It's used everywhere and has quite logical grammar. Some notable exceptions, but nothing bad. Now compare that to e.g. french or chinese :S

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by caligula View Post
                  I wonder what makes you say that. English is not my native language, but it has been the easiest language to learn. Even poor and uneducated indian children learn english. It's used everywhere and has quite logical grammar. Some notable exceptions, but nothing bad. Now compare that to e.g. french or chinese :S
                  English is easy to learn because of its simple grammar. I agree on that.

                  I was talking about spelling. Consider the example "door" and "foot". There is no [1] way to determine the spelling of these words from the pronounciation and vice versa. This problem is endemic in English (obligatory wikipedia reference). To go back to your example, in French you can (most of the time) infer the pronounciation from the spelling. Chinese is a different matter altogether (and in so many dimensions).


                  [1] If you speak other Germanic languages or know some proto Germanic language, you might succeed in determing the spelling and/or pronounciation.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mufasa72 View Post
                    Just in case you are wondering why a paragraph with 2^16=65535 characters exist:

                    The portuguese legal tradition requires ~all their documents being written without paragraph breaks -- and this tradition radiated out to other countries, most importantly: all of Brazil.
                    So they took the meaning "documents are all nothing but walls of text" literally?

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