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Debian Installer Jessie Alpha 1 Released

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  • Debian Installer Jessie Alpha 1 Released

    Phoronix: Debian Installer Jessie Alpha 1 Released

    Today's been a very exciting open-source Linux news day and there's still a lot more to share. The latest surprising news today is the availability of the first alpha installer release for Debian 8.0 Jessie...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYzNjI

  • #2
    Great. Does it support GPT partitioning on installation and using EFI GRUB?

    May be now I can build Debian live image with from testing and including this installer.

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    • #3
      Thanks for saying it's only the installer, but you should put a bold notice about that.

      Comment


      • #4
        There seem to be full images with that installer as well: http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/je...amd64/iso-dvd/
        I couldn't find anything for a USB though. I don't like using DVDs.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by shmerl View Post
          There seem to be full images with that installer as well: http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/je...amd64/iso-dvd/
          I couldn't find anything for a USB though. I don't like using DVDs.
          Salut,

          @shmerl

          You won't find any... Actualy, you just need to make a:

          Code:
          # cp debian.iso /dev/sdX  (your key)
          # sync
          Here:

          https://www.debian.org/releases/whee...h04s03.html.en

          It was one of the big goal to reach for the project before Wheezy being released.

          Code:
          Great. Does it support GPT partitioning on installation and using EFI GRUB?
          It seems to be OK:

          "Note that the Debian Installer (D-I) for AMD64 testing/Jessie already correctly boots and installs on a computer with UEFI firmware, putting in a GUID partition table (GPT) on a raw drive in the process."

          http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=81120

          I haven't tried it yet but you can create your GPT partition before trying to install. If the installer recognise it, it'll probably work.
          Be careful to not do that on disc already configure with DOS partitioning; I mean don't make it on a drive you are already using, use another empty one. Just to be sure, unpluged all your other drives and test it.


          A+
          Debcool

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by shmerl View Post
            There seem to be full images with that installer as well: http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/je...amd64/iso-dvd/
            I couldn't find anything for a USB though. I don't like using DVDs.
            Debian uses the hybrid-iso format by default, just use dd or cat to write the CD/DVD image to your USB device, no special USB version is needed.

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            • #7
              Ah, great. But they are split in 3 parts. I guess I need 3 USB sticks for that (unless 2 and 3 are really optional).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by shmerl View Post
                Ah, great. But they are split in 3 parts. I guess I need 3 USB sticks for that (unless 2 and 3 are really optional).
                Yes, the first one is enought. It have the most tipical software. The two others have more software, but it can be downloaded by internet when (and if) you install it.

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                • #9
                  Default init?

                  Seriously not trying to start a holy war here, just asking, What's the default init it comes with?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by c117152 View Post
                    Seriously not trying to start a holy war here, just asking, What's the default init it comes with?
                    sysv it seems as systemd is not available on first images

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hmm, well, they still have time, but starting early testing is important too.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Winter is coming..

                        I truly dread every time that a debian release gets close, because I dread having the testing branch eternally frozen for like almost an entire year..
                        Even if it is not quite a year every time, it is still months and months and months of no updates besides bug fixes.. The same versions of linux kernel and all your programs, stuck at the same version for what seems like eternity..

                        I usually check for updates every few days, and honestly it is kind of fun to update stuff for me.. Which makes the big freeze that much more painful..
                        I love debian the most still, and would never use any other distrobution.. I will probably keep using it for ever, but...it still just massively sucks every time the giant freeze comes..
                        I really wish they would come up with a different method of preparing the debian stable branch..

                        P.S. No I will not switch to any other distro like arch or any thing, so please don't recommend any distros to me..

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Didn't Debian project plan on reducing the freeze period? There was a whole effort directed at it with various measures to make Debian testing close to "always releasable": http://lwn.net/Articles/550032/
                          Did it work out in the end? I use Debian testing myself and want it to be a truly rolling distro without such huge freezing stalls.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Salut,

                            I never heard about reducing the freeze period but they decided to try to publish a Stable every 2 years. Btw, They've already fixed the date of the starting freeze period for Jessie.

                            https://lists.debian.org/debian-deve.../msg00004.html

                            Basicly, the freeze period is suposed to be 6 month but the goal of the project is to make the best they can (non blocking/critical bugs) even if it means to postpone the release. Of course not for too long neither. Sometimes they make radical decicions and eliminate blocking pakages ( they go back to sid repo) to be able to publish the stable. If I remember right, Wheezy freezed period was 8 month.

                            There has been a talk about making Testing as a rolling release at the Debconf 2012 but many people disagred with it. I don't know if it still on the menu or not.

                            In my experience, I usually start to use the next Testing about 6 month after a new Stable has been released (because it's a mess during that time) and keeping the stable beside just in case.

                            A+
                            Debcool

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yeah, Wheezy freeze period was horribly long. Even 6 months is way too much. The idea of reducing freeze and ways to achieve that was reported here : http://lwn.net/Articles/550032/
                              I really hope Debian accepted that proposal.

                              Comment

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