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Google Replacing GTK2 With Aura In Chrome 35

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  • Google Replacing GTK2 With Aura In Chrome 35

    Phoronix: Google Replacing GTK2 With Aura In Chrome 35

    Google will finally be migrating from GTK2 to their own Aura UI code with a target of Chrome/Chromium 35...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYyNzQ

  • #2
    Google created AURA as an replacement for GTK, no problem with the community. what would have happened if we had replaced "google" with "canonical"?
    Last edited by edoantonioco; 03-11-2014, 10:26 PM.

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    • #3
      Whoever labeled this release "unstable" is a liar. Chrome 35 with Aura is faster and more stable than Chrome 34 with GTK2. Also, you may see hardware decoding enabled, but you require a strict set of conditions (hardware decoding is via VAAPI/VDPAU, so only works on NVIDIA proprietary, Intel free, and AMD free. Also, you need a very recent release of Mesa to make it happen, and disabling the GPU blacklist is mandatory).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by edoantonioco View Post
        Google created AURA as an replacement for GTK, no problem with the community. what would have happened if we had replaced "google" with "canonical"?
        Canonical would never support all those platforms. Canonical only rebrands software, adding minor modifications instead of attempting to work with upstream, thus creating fragmentation that they could have easily prevented.

        I wouldn't be surprised if Canonical found a use for AURA, rebrands it and attempts to label it as some brand new, never before seen, nothing even comes close to it, etc. etc. etc. software. Google would be a tough upstream to go against though.
        Last edited by Ouroboros; 03-11-2014, 10:34 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by edoantonioco View Post
          Google created AURA as an replacement for GTK, no problem with the community. what would have happened if we had replaced "google" with "canonical"?
          The answer lies in the specific terms of the CLA. With Google, if you contribute to Chromium, you give them a perpetual and non-revocable license, but you keep the copyright and the right to relicense. With Canonical, you give both away to them, so it's free work for Canonical.

          Google CLA: https://developers.google.com/open-s...dividual?csw=1
          Canonical CLA: http://www.canonical.com/static/file...nt_ver_2.5.pdf
          Last edited by Alejandro Nova; 03-11-2014, 10:40 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Alejandro Nova View Post
            The answer lies in the specific terms of the CLA. With Google, if you contribute to Chromium, you give them a perpetual and non-revocable license, but you keep the copyright and the right to relicense. With Canonical, you give both away to them, so it's free work for Canonical.
            Please inform yourself. You are not giving away your copyright or right to release your code under a different license with Canonical's CLA.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
              Please inform yourself. You are not giving away your copyright or right to release your code under a different license with Canonical's CLA.
              Damn edit time limit. Just read the new CLA and I get that you are indeed right. Now you only allow relicensing, but you keep those rights. However, this policy only applies from 2011 on. Correcting.

              http://www.canonical.com/static/file...-CLA-ANY-I.pdf

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              • #8
                Any positive effect on font rendering or page scrolling?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alejandro Nova View Post
                  Whoever labeled this release "unstable" is a liar. Chrome 35 with Aura is faster and more stable than Chrome 34 with GTK2. Also, you may see hardware decoding enabled, but you require a strict set of conditions (hardware decoding is via VAAPI/VDPAU, so only works on NVIDIA proprietary, Intel free, and AMD free. Also, you need a very recent release of Mesa to make it happen, and disabling the GPU blacklist is mandatory).
                  flash pepper doesn't use vaapi or vdpau.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pandev92 View Post
                    flash pepper doesn't use vaapi or vdpau.
                    AFAIK Flash connects to Pepper, Pepper links against those APIs.

                    This commit has landed. Now, if you disable the GPU blacklist, you get video decoding acceleration, within the limitations of your system.

                    https://codereview.chromium.org/176883018/

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