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  • LibreOffice 4.2.1 Has 100+ Bug-Fixes

    Phoronix: LibreOffice 4.2.1 Has 100+ Bug-Fixes

    Less than one month after the release of the major LibreOffice 4.2 update, LibreOffice 4.2.1 has been released to ship a large number of fixes for discovered problems...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYxMDE

  • #2
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: LibreOffice 4.2.1 Has 100+ Bug-Fixes

    Less than one month after the release of the major LibreOffice 4.2 update, LibreOffice 4.2.1 has been released to ship a large number of fixes for discovered problems...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYxMDE
    If they want to actually have any users, they need to get off their asses and get it working on ANDROID... YESTERDAY.
    Wondoze users aren't going to use it, because they're just going to drink whatever koolaid MS feeds to them.
    Desktop linux isn't going to get them users, because its user share is too low.
    Apple isn't going to get them users, because nobody who actually needs a computer to be PRODUCTIVE would touch apple with a 10 foot pole.
    Android is in the hands of more people than anything else, and DOES NOT HAVE a viable document editing package... yet is available on many different forms of hardware (including desktop), and now even has support for PRINTING.

    Comment


    • #3
      There is already an answer

      The answer is PDF.js and more importantly, WebODF (http://webodf.org). Slap those technologies in an app and you are halfway there. I doubt that people want to create document / excel content on their phone... they just want to consume it.

      Also, LibreOffice is too slow moving to make the radical changes it needs to stay relevant.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bpetty View Post
        The answer is PDF.js and more importantly, WebODF (http://webodf.org). Slap those technologies in an app and you are halfway there. I doubt that people want to create document / excel content on their phone... they just want to consume it.

        Also, LibreOffice is too slow moving to make the radical changes it needs to stay relevant.
        Do you suggest a better alternative? OpenOffice? Calligra? Abiword?

        That way, you need to maintain two code bases. What about compiling LO to Javascript with one of these projects? I wonder if it's possible to make it efficient enough. What about PNaCl? Javascript is not too comfortable to use in bigs projects, too.

        Anyway, I think most office suits should maintain a common framework related to file format support and important features. This way, FOSS office suites would compete better to the Microsoft alternative.

        I think LO needs to focus on niches currently forgotten by most office suites, like education. I use Dmaths for my homework, but it's not correctly translated and lacks many features about maths, physics and geometry.

        I understand they do have limited resources and depends on the interests by employers like Novell and Red Hat, but what about non-profit education organizations? They could hire a few developers to make LO a lot more useful in education (and that may include some kind of better integration with e-learning platforms, too).

        Other issue I have about LO is the way of inserting Maths, it's slow and one needs to learn "tags" that depend on the used language. Despite that, I'm sure many computer "illiterate" people may have issues "coding" the math formulas.

        Comment


        • #5
          I only use LibreOffice for word processing, but at the moment for completing my tasks it's the most efficient software around, and by far.
          Yes it may evolve slowly, but that's still much faster than OpenOffice.org at the time, and its evolution is not the none-sense that Ms Office has become right now. You can also forget about Pages, which is great software but isn't enough focused on pure word processing.
          There is still Nisus Writer out there, but if we want to complain about LibreOffice's slow development process, well, Nisus is not really relevant either.

          As for the Android version, sorry but I don't agree. Absolutely NOTHING in this OS is designed for productivity, from the lack of organization to the way the desktop is handled. Trying to put and Android version as soon as possible would be a waste of money as well as a waste of time.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by timofonic View Post
            Do you suggest a better alternative? OpenOffice? Calligra? Abiword?

            That way, you need to maintain two code bases. What about compiling LO to Javascript with one of these projects? I wonder if it's possible to make it efficient enough. What about PNaCl? Javascript is not too comfortable to use in bigs projects, too.

            Anyway, I think most office suits should maintain a common framework related to file format support and important features. This way, FOSS office suites would compete better to the Microsoft alternative.

            I think LO needs to focus on niches currently forgotten by most office suites, like education. I use Dmaths for my homework, but it's not correctly translated and lacks many features about maths, physics and geometry.

            I understand they do have limited resources and depends on the interests by employers like Novell and Red Hat, but what about non-profit education organizations? They could hire a few developers to make LO a lot more useful in education (and that may include some kind of better integration with e-learning platforms, too).

            Other issue I have about LO is the way of inserting Maths, it's slow and one needs to learn "tags" that depend on the used language. Despite that, I'm sure many computer "illiterate" people may have issues "coding" the math formulas.
            If I want professional publications I'm not touching any of those software options.

            TeXLive 2013/2014 and a selection of proper TeX Editors or if you prefer, LyX. These tools kick the crap out of Wordprocessors.

            Comment


            • #7
              I like libre office. I recommend it to all my friends.

              Isn't there odt readers already for android? Not to mention that web based solution?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ua=42 View Post
                I like libre office. I recommend it to all my friends.

                Isn't there odt readers already for android? Not to mention that web based solution?
                There is webodf: http://webodf.org/apps/
                https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...mtasche.reader

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                  If they want to actually have any users, they need to get off their asses and get it working on ANDROID... YESTERDAY.
                  Nobody wants the editor on android. If you're just talking about a viewer app, that would be nice.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
                    If I want professional publications I'm not touching any of those software options.

                    TeXLive 2013/2014 and a selection of proper TeX Editors or if you prefer, LyX. These tools kick the crap out of Wordprocessors.
                    But LaTeX/TeX or the rest of the zillion of derivatives are a lot more similar to programming than "just" writing. While I'm very interested in TeXLive and tried it, it's not simple for the average or above average user. There's not a solution that's more powerful than current office suites like LO but not as complex than using LaTeX.

                    In the old days, education systems tried to tech computer programming to kids and had some moderate success. Unfortunately that's no longer the case, people are too used to GUIs and get scared when need to even learn simple markup languages like HTML or XML. That's the reality and it sucks, but FOSS should deal with it in a constructive way (and not like the Gnome 3 disaster, making software only suitable for "idiots").

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                    • #11
                      There's not a solution that's more powerful than current office suites like LO but not as complex than using LaTeX.
                      There is, it's called asciidoc.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by timofonic View Post
                        Do you suggest a better alternative? OpenOffice? Calligra? Abiword?
                        For word processing, markup tools are much better than WYSIWYG tools: Markdown, RST, LaTeX, or _maybe_ in some cases HTML are all better than LibreOffice or Word.

                        For slideshows, same thing. Some HTML5+JS solutions like reveal.js are really nice. LaTeX+Beamer is good for some stuff.

                        For spreadsheets, I think Google Docs handles 98% of the use cases of Excel or LibreOffice. The only real complaint I've heard is creating regression lines in plots are much harder than need be. The online storage and collaboration features are hugely valuable. For people doing data analysis type tasks in a spreadsheet, a command line tool like R or one of the R-like tools like python+pandas or Incanter is often a better choice.

                        Originally posted by timofonic View Post
                        Anyway, I think most office suits should maintain a common framework related to file format support and important features. This way, FOSS office suites would compete better to the Microsoft alternative.
                        I think Markdown/RST/LaTeX/CSV/HTML formats all make more sense than Office Suite binary files in almost all cases.

                        Originally posted by timofonic View Post
                        I use Dmaths for my homework, but it's not correctly translated and lacks many features about maths, physics and geometry.
                        LaTeX's specialty is math. Tools like Markdown and MathJax use LaTeX internally to render math.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by timofonic View Post
                          But LaTeX/TeX or the rest of the zillion of derivatives are a lot more similar to programming than "just" writing. While I'm very interested in TeXLive and tried it, it's not simple for the average or above average user. There's not a solution that's more powerful than current office suites like LO but not as complex than using LaTeX.
                          Markdown or RST are extremely easy to use. Much easier than HTML.

                          Originally posted by timofonic View Post
                          Unfortunately that's no longer the case, people are too used to GUIs and get scared when need to even learn simple markup languages like HTML or XML.
                          An advanced user is really comfortable using a programmer's text editor like Geany or Sublime Text and editing markup and using a shell tool to generate PDF files. The real non-techie audience could never do that. There are easier to use GUI websites or rich client apps for authoring Markdown and generating PDFs...

                          I'd still recommend that over a heavy-weight "Office Suite" like LibreOffice or MS Office.

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