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An Exploit In GNOME Shell With Systemd?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by JS987 View Post
    found article why systemd is broken by design
    http://ewontfix.com/14/
    That "article" is hilariously filled with errors, like systemd needs a reboot after an upgrade. Systemd is simply the best designed and executed init-system for Linux by a large margin, which is why distro maintainers and developers who actually knows about such things, are choosing it as their distros init-system.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by gens View Post
      you know..
      everything systemd does has been done at least 10 years ago, some things are even a lot older
      it's just that for the new generation this all is new (yes, i'm the new generation too)

      problem is the flow is going off a cliff
      Yes, systemd does a lot of stuff that has been done before. It would be weird if it didn't, as it aims to provide a well designed alternative to several existing pieces of Linux infrastructure. Seems to me systemd does not reinvent where there are good solutions already available, but isn't afraid to do so where necessary. A healthy mindset for any software project, if you ask me.

      The going off a cliff part is what many (apparently most) intelligent and accomplished Linux developers do not agree with you on. Proponents of other kernels are understandably not as enthusiastic.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by JS987 View Post
        found article why systemd is broken by design
        http://ewontfix.com/14/
        you found article broken by design about systemd. here, i corrected it for you

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        • #19
          This is unexpected... Ubuntu switching to SystemD.
          http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/1316
          EDIT: Looks like someone has made a thread here: http://www.phoronix.com/forums/showt...tch-to-systemd

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          • #20
            Ubuntu is going to use systemd too

            well fan boys Ubuntu is changing out to systemd as well can any one say some debian TC developers have a conflict of interest

            With Bdale Garbee’s casting vote this week, the Debian technical committee finally settled the question of init for both Debian and Ubuntu in favour of systemd.

            I’d like to thank the committee for their thoughtful debate under pressure in the fishbowl; it set a high bar for analysis and experience-driven decision making since most members of the committee clearly took time to familiarise themselves with both options. I know the many people who work on Upstart appreciated the high praise for its code quality, rigorous testing and clarity of purpose expressed even by members who voted against it; from my perspective, it has been a pleasure to support the efforts of people who want to create truly great free software, and do it properly. Upstart has served Ubuntu extremely well – it gave us a great competitive advantage at a time when things became very dynamic in the kernel, it’s been very stable (it is after all the init used in both Ubuntu and RHEL 6 and has set a high standard for Canonical-lead software quality of which I am proud.

            Nevertheless, the decision is for systemd, and given that Ubuntu is quite centrally a member of the Debian family, that’s a decision we support. I will ask members of the Ubuntu community to help to implement this decision efficiently, bringing systemd into both Debian and Ubuntu safely and expeditiously. It will no doubt take time to achieve the stability and coverage that we enjoy today and in 14.04 LTS with Upstart, but I will ask the Ubuntu tech board (many of whom do not work for Canonical) to review the position and map out appropriate transition plans. We’ll certainly complete work to make the new logind work without systemd as pid 1. I expect they will want to bring systemd into Ubuntu as an option for developers as soon as it is reliably available in Debian, and as our default as soon as it offers a credible quality of service to match the existing init.

            Technologies of choice evolve, and our platform evolves both to lead (today our focus is on the cloud and on mobile, and we are quite clearly leading GNU/Linux on both fronts) and to embrace change imposed elsewhere. Init is contentious because it is required for both developers and system administrators to understand its quirks and capabilities. No wonder this was a difficult debate, the consequences for hundreds of thousands of people are very high. From my perspective the fact that good people were clearly split suggests that either option would work perfectly well. I trust the new stewards of pid 1 will take that responsibility as seriously as the Upstart team has done, and be as pleasant to work with. And… onward.
            http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/1316

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            • #21
              You're a little late with the post Attentäter

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              • #22
                Originally posted by interested View Post
                That "article" is hilariously filled with errors, like systemd needs a reboot after an upgrade. Systemd is simply the best designed and executed init-system for Linux by a large margin, which is why distro maintainers and developers who actually knows about such things, are choosing it as their distros init-system.
                are you unable to read, unable to comprehend or are you maliciously perverting what the author wrote?

                so - are you dumb or evil?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Sidicas View Post
                  This reminds me of the linux desktop screen lockers (KDE 2.x?) that were meant to keep other people out, but could be overriden by a logged out user with physical access to the PC and some button mashing. Eventually they fixed those.

                  It looks like this requires physical access to the PC to force a hibernate. Not too serious.
                  As far as I know KDE never made such mistake. It was gnome 2, but it's hard to find the link to this bug now.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Pawlerson View Post
                    As far as I know KDE never made such mistake. It was gnome 2, but it's hard to find the link to this bug now.
                    I remember the bug he was referring to, Phoronix covered it: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tem&px=MTA0NTA It was an X Server bug that affected all Desktop Environments. But that was in the KDE 4 days, not the KDE 2.x days, so maybe he's referring to a different bug?

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