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GNOME Shell Lands High DPI Support

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  • #21
    Originally posted by fritzls View Post
    This is the problem.
    It's not about what you think ( sorry, Iím being honest) but what I want and need.
    You missed the point. Your vendor had the same in mind while choosing that panel. turning on hidpi scaling on a 1080p screen would result into
    an "effective" resolution of 960x540 which is useless. I am pretty sure you don't want nor need that. In case you do I am not stopping you
    from setting the scale factor in gsettings. We can't currently do stuff like 1.5 or 1.2 scale for technical reasons (X limitations). So you are better
    of with changing the font scale.

    Originally posted by fritzls View Post
    nor everyone want use this 96 dpi. not everyone have an eagle eyes . It's really annoying.
    At end of day our eyes start hurts because of everything small.

    change the font dpi turn everything like a kid paper/glue project..
    The last line makes no sense at all. The effect is the same you get larger fonts ...

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    • #22
      Originally posted by drago01 View Post
      To answer some questions:

      Re multimonitor and integer scaling:
      https://mail.gnome.org/archives/desk.../msg00010.html

      Why can't I change the dpi from 96?
      See: https://git.gnome.org/browse/gnome-s...-manager.c#n70

      As for 1080p I don't think your dpi is high enough to warrant scaling everything just increasing the font scale if needed should be enough. (If you have a 192dpi+ 1080p display you have a problem but I don't think you can get such a display outside of smartphones).
      Extremely useful information! It also shows what a hinder xorg is.
      But why isn't this exposed in any wiki?! Just look how many forum posts are there regarding DPI, with people searching in the dark, banging their heads against xorg.conf, xfi, xrandr and what not.


      Originally posted by chrisb View Post
      HiDpi displays have been out for several years now, having recently acquired one I was surprised by how badly supported they still are on Linux desktops. I saw people recommending KDE, saying that it was the only desktop built to be size independent, but I tried it and it was clear that it had problems (tiny window decorations, badly placed our sized text etc). Will be interesting to see how well this new Gnome patch works out.
      Originally posted by fritzls View Post
      Well. If is so hard to do it by heuristic ( I agree it is)..
      Turn some default DPI values, like 96, 120, 140, another ones into a easy way to be changed by users ( not all possible market dpi, but ones near the default ones we have by in market today) or a way we can change this by manual x/y size input.

      It's not something frugal ou non useful. It's something basic from the usability viewpoint.
      Better have a near dpi for Uhd than a standard 96dpi.

      If My skill can help into this I'm proud of do it. but I cant. unfortunately.

      Thanks.
      To me the lack of even proper statements on what DPI-related implementations are deprecated speaks volumes. The situation is bad.




      Originally posted by fritzls View Post
      This is the problem.
      It's not about what you think ( sorry, Iím being honest) but what I want and need.
      nor everyone want use this 96 dpi. not everyone have an eagle eyes . It's really annoying.
      At end of day our eyes start hurts because of everything small.

      change the font dpi turn everything like a kid paper/glue project..
      Easy there. He's a developer, sharing extremely valuable info on the subject. Please don't make him regret this.

      Originally posted by fritzls View Post
      UBUNTU 14.04
      gnome ( from official repository)
      kde ( from official repository)
      Linux mint ( from night repository)
      unity ( default )

      resolution = not Ultra resolution but just full hd 1920x1080
      display size = 382mm x 215mm

      And the default DPI is? 96dpi. I cant change this no matter what i do.
      According to http://www.sven.de/dpi/ your ppi is 127.65 so almost equal to this of my display. This is circa 1.3 of the base 96. So drago01 was right, you should be fine with just the text scaling.

      What I use is on my Gnome Shell system:
      dconf > org.gnome.desktop.interface > text-scaling-factor set to 1.2
      This made the top bar font a bit too big so I changed /usr/share/gnome-shell/theme/gnome-shell.css font-size: 11pt; to 9pt;


      Web content is a bitch when it comes to scaling though. I use NoSquint Firefox extension with default scaling set to either: 110 text 125 full OR 130 text 100 full. It's text scaling that usually breaks web pages layout. I've set it to control text zoom using scroll wheel so whenever a site breaks I adjust for it. NoSquint works based on the default plus it remembers custom zoom settings you've set on the fly for any website. Please donate if you find it useful!

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Bucic View Post
        Web content is a bitch when it comes to scaling though. I use NoSquint Firefox extension with default scaling set to either: 110 text 125 full OR 130 text 100 full. It's text scaling that usually breaks web pages layout. I've set it to control text zoom using scroll wheel so whenever a site breaks I adjust for it. NoSquint works based on the default plus it remembers custom zoom settings you've set on the fly for any website. Please donate if you find it useful!
        If you are using firefox you can simply change layout.css.devPixelsPerPx in about:conifg to something like 1.2

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        • #24
          Originally posted by drago01 View Post
          If you are using firefox you can simply change layout.css.devPixelsPerPx in about:conifg to something like 1.2
          Best for preserving layout of pages but upscales Firefox's UI.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by fritzls View Post
            Well. If is so hard to do it by heuristic ( I agree it is)..
            I thought the link really downplayed the possibility of using a big lookup table. The vast majority of HiDpi systems are laptops with easily identifiable manufacturer and model, and the screen sizes don't get changed often. If EDID is unreliable, then construct some other fingerprint to identify the system (or just ask the user), and have all the DPI values prestored. Even for regular monitors, this approach would be more accurate than the current one.

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            • #26
              Indeed, how hard is it to ask the user "is this DPI ok?", or even "this is the EDID cm measurement, is it ok: 50x30cm?". Correct DPI scaling > integer hacks.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by chrisb View Post
                HiDpi displays have been out for several years now, having recently acquired one I was surprised by how badly supported they still are on Linux desktops. I saw people recommending KDE, saying that it was the only desktop built to be size independent, but I tried it and it was clear that it had problems (tiny window decorations, badly placed our sized text etc). Will be interesting to see how well this new Gnome patch works out.
                Exactly, 3840x2400 has been around since 2001 with IBM's T220/T221 series of monitors, other companies like NEC and Eizo have also produced high DPI desktop displays over the last decade and we've known that 3840x2160 where comming to the consumer market for over 2 years.

                LG now has phones out with a 5.5" 2560x1440 res screen http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/...h-at-mwc-2014/

                Even better then that is the Meizu MX4G 5.5" 2560x1536 res screen http://www.engadget.com/2014/01/21/m...giant-screens/

                Thats nearly 550DPI...

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                  Exactly, 3840x2400 has been around since 2001 with IBM's T220/T221 series of monitors, other companies like NEC and Eizo have also produced high DPI desktop displays over the last decade and we've known that 3840x2160 where comming to the consumer market for over 2 years.

                  LG now has phones out with a 5.5" 2560x1440 res screen http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/...h-at-mwc-2014/

                  Even better then that is the Meizu MX4G 5.5" 2560x1536 res screen http://www.engadget.com/2014/01/21/m...giant-screens/

                  Thats nearly 550DPI...
                  The rationalization behind hardcoded DPI was symptomatic. I've seen it more than once. They discard a solution just because the solution may not work for someone using tripple-head-2-go, SLI graphic cards and has a cat.

                  This is why we have so much cavemenism in IT.

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