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The Biggest Problem With GTK & What Qt Does Good

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  • #11
    Re

    Originally posted by frign View Post
    Doesn't change the fact Qt is a bloated pos.
    Seems that you don't have any experience with Qt... Especially when a Qt 5 core application is just a few KB now...
    ----------

    There is a lot to be liked about Qt.
    I also use Qt Creator for non-Qt C/C++ application development. To whom I show it's capabilities and easiness, all get impressed.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by frign View Post
      Doesn't change the fact Qt is a bloated pos.
      W00t? Get your facts straight... Qt is one of the fastest C++ frameworks out there (I remember a benchmark once that showed that Qt's overhead over plain C++ was only a few %). For most handy desktop applications written in Qt the shared libs take only around 30MiB of RAM.

      You might be mistaking Qt for KDE, many people make that false assumption that because KDE is written in Qt and it's not too fast (although I have no problems with the performance of KDE), then they think that it's Qt's fault. It's not - KDE is large on it's own and much of it's percieved "slowness" on low end machines is attributed to useful KDE services running in the background, like Nepomuk, KIO, etc, which are there by design - KDE is not meant for low performance desktops.

      If anything - Qt is not bloated.

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      • #13
        Qt is not bloated, but modular and light enough to be used in embedded devices. For example:

        Beaglebone: Example Qt Embedded Linux Application

        This is the third video in a set of three on Qt application development on the Beaglebone or any other embedded Linux device. The first video introduces the LCD module that I used and the second video is where I set up a full toolchain for C++ Qt application development under embedded Linux (Qt for embedded devices). This toolchain allows us to cross compile Qt applications for the Beaglebone, deploy the applications directly to the beaglebone with a single click and even use remote debugging using gdbserver to diagnose any problems with our applications. The main use of this platform is for GUI application development when a LCD module, or external display is present.

        In this the final video in this series I demonstrate an example application that uses an accelerometer and LED to act as output/input devices and I provide the full source code. I explain how the source code is structured and how the physical circuit was configured.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNvOyY9zK1o

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Original Article
          Other praise that Dirk had for the Qt tool-kit included the qmake build system
          Which is actually being phased out once Qbs is ready, probably when it starts to be used to compile Qt itself inhouse.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
            Qt is one of the fastest C++ frameworks out there
            Since Qt5, Qt isn't real C++ framework as Javascript(QML) is main language, Widgets are in maintenance and C++ became second class citizen. Javascript requires JIT compiler and garbage collector which are bloat C++ applications don't need.
            Javascript is much more defective language than C++. It is stupid idea to write one application in two incompatible languages.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by JS987 View Post
              Since Qt5, Qt isn't real C++ framework as Javascript(QML) is main language.
              No it isn't. QML is little more than a DSL that can hook into the C++ Qt libraries, it vastly simplifies the creation of modern UIs hence why it's being pushed. But it doesn't stop anyone writing in C++, in fact it would being pointless writing anything other than trivial GUI applications in QML as it just wasn't designed for that.

              Originally posted by JS987 View Post
              Widgets are in maintenance
              Not entirely true, a new QWidget class was added in 5.2 alone - but I think you're right, this is the general direction for GUI applications. And I personally think it's the right direction.

              Originally posted by JS987 View Post
              Javascript is much more defective language than C++. It is stupid idea to write one application in two incompatible languages.
              This sentence makes no sense.

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              • #17
                IMHO there should be one (and only one) widget library. It would make application development much easier on Linux. On Windows you can ask the operating system to create a window, and this is something that I miss on Linux. There are a lot of things I love about Linux, but the graphical interface is not one of them for sure.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by wargames View Post
                  IMHO there should be one (and only one) widget library. It would make application development much easier on Linux. On Windows you can ask the operating system to create a window, and this is something that I miss on Linux. There are a lot of things I love about Linux, but the graphical interface is not one of them for sure.
                  XCreateWindow

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                  • #19
                    I use Qt Creator for everything too. If you don't know me, I work on Mesa and occasionally on the kernel, libdrm, piglit, and xf86-video-ati. Qt Creator is absolutely the best IDE I've ever worked with and before that I had been a long-time user of Visual C++ (the best on Windows at the time) and tried Eclipse and a couple of others. In Qt Creator, I only use the editing and compiling features and usually just do "Import an existing project", which creates a new project by importing all source files from a specific directory and subdirectories and runs "make" when I build it. It's pretty good even for kernel development. I usually import entire git repos, but with the kernel I only import the drivers/gpu/drm subtree and all the header files used by it. Thanks to the Qt Creator team, I wouldn't have been so productive without it.

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                    • #20
                      What I don't like about Qt apps from my experience with KDE is that theming is crap. I don't know if that's KDEs fault but on Gnome 3 you just set your Gtk+ theme and your window decorations to use the same theme and everything looks nice and consistent. With Qt on KDE there is no way to change the look from the oxygen style to something different without having ending up having applications that look like crap. In the GTK world the the GTK+ theme determins how the buttons, progressbars, colors etc look and the corresponding window decoration makes sure that it all looks nice. In KDE that's almost impossible. It's nice that you can easily download more themes and window decorations and color schemes from within KDE, but I have not found a single combo that looks halfway decent. I tried bespin and qtcurve but that didn't help either.

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