Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Open-Source Blu-Ray Update Works On BD-Java Support

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Open-Source Blu-Ray Update Works On BD-Java Support

    Phoronix: Open-Source Blu-Ray Update Works On BD-Java Support

    The VideoLAN project has announced the release of libbluray 0.5.0, the latest version of the open-source Blu-ray library. This latest release has better BD-J Java support and other new/improved features...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU1MjI

  • #2
    Is it possible to watch Bluray Movies (commercial movies on bluray discs) on linux actually (somehow)?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mcgreg View Post
      Is it possible to watch Bluray Movies (commercial movies on bluray discs) on linux actually (somehow)?
      Depends.

      https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/BluRay

      I just bought an external Blu-ray drive recently, along with two relatively new Blu rays.
      "Cloud Atlas" and "The Hobbit (Extended Ed.)".
      With both I was out of luck following the description above.

      Not sure if I did something wrong or if it's just due to the discs being too new.
      In any case, watching Blu-ray movies on Linux is not an out-of-the-box experience as it seems.

      P.S. The DRM protection schmeme coming with Blu rays is crazy.
      Think about this configuration: I am not able to watch Blu rays on a new Thinkpad notebook
      (running Windows for now), because the internal display is not HDCP-compliant.
      At least the software (PowerDVD 13) says so and refuses to play Blu-ray discs.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mcgreg View Post
        Is it possible to watch Bluray Movies (commercial movies on bluray discs) on linux actually (somehow)?
        Not legally, no. You'd have to crack the DRM on the Blu-ray you bought. That said, the same is with DVDs. Just that DVDs use a really easy to crack DRM.

        Originally posted by entropy View Post
        P.S. The DRM protection schmeme coming with Blu rays is crazy.
        Yeap. The DVD DRM scheme was really complicated, with several layers of keys. But the Blu-ray DRM scheme is outright paranoid they took all the complexity from DVDs and then added several more layers of keys. You can only watch the video if you combine the keys from the Blu-ray player, the player software, several keys in different locations on the Blu-ray disc itself, and sometimes also from the graphics card, the video cable and the screen. And even then it probably won't work until you dance a voodoo dance or something.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
          Not legally, no. You'd have to crack the DRM on the Blu-ray you bought. That said, the same is with DVDs. Just that DVDs use a really easy to crack DRM.
          Not legally in the US. In several counties it is very legal. In Canada for example, not only is it legal but you can purchase software to do the ripping in your major retailers.

          Comment


          • #6
            Ok, so if you totally ignore the legal topic, it is technically possible like it is with dvd?
            For dvd you have decss-lib. So there is something similiar for blurays?

            If I buy a external ir internal bluray-device, can I watch a bluray movie just by inserting a bluray and watch? With vlc?
            Or do I need to crack it before I watch it?
            Do I need windows to crack it? Can I do it just with linux?

            Comment


            • #7
              some have been able to use makemkv to play discs without ripping them.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by entropy View Post
                Depends.

                https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/BluRay

                I just bought an external Blu-ray drive recently, along with two relatively new Blu rays.
                "Cloud Atlas" and "The Hobbit (Extended Ed.)".
                With both I was out of luck following the description above.

                Not sure if I did something wrong or if it's just due to the discs being too new.
                In any case, watching Blu-ray movies on Linux is not an out-of-the-box experience as it seems.

                P.S. The DRM protection schmeme coming with Blu rays is crazy.
                Think about this configuration: I am not able to watch Blu rays on a new Thinkpad notebook
                (running Windows for now), because the internal display is not HDCP-compliant.
                At least the software (PowerDVD 13) says so and refuses to play Blu-ray discs.
                Buy Bluray disc.
                Lay it to side, as you also purchased the right to play.
                Torrent the video you need in bluray quality.
                Enjoy.

                If you sell the disc, your legal right is waived, so don't do that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by brosis View Post
                  Buy Bluray disc.
                  Lay it to side, as you also purchased the right to play.
                  Torrent the video you need in bluray quality.
                  Enjoy.

                  If you sell the disc, your legal right is waived, so don't do that.
                  Except that, since copyright lawyers read copyright law like the devil reads the bible, they can consider torrenting to be distributing (you seed while you download), so they can still press charges against you. Several people have faced charges for this dubious reasoning in my country.

                  This is why we need copyright reform badly - torrenting needs to be made equivalent to downloading, and only considered distribution for the originator, the one who originally added the torrent online.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mcgreg View Post
                    Ok, so if you totally ignore the legal topic, it is technically possible like it is with dvd?
                    For dvd you have decss-lib. So there is something similiar for blurays?

                    If I buy a external ir internal bluray-device, can I watch a bluray movie just by inserting a bluray and watch? With vlc?
                    Or do I need to crack it before I watch it?
                    Do I need windows to crack it? Can I do it just with linux?
                    Hi, I watch the couple bluray disks I have almost hassle free.
                    I followed the archwiki steps (libbluray, libaacs, putting KEYDB.CFG into the right place), then when I insert a BD I mount it, and xbmc plays it back no trouble. With mplayer you have to specify the mount directory. It's all on the wiki. (never tried with vlc)

                    YMMV of course depending on whether your disk uses AACS or BD+ (no experience with BD+) and if by any unluck you get a newer key and those you have in KEYDB.CFG had been revoked. It's a mess, and a PITA and designed against the user...

                    To sum up : you do not need to crack it, but buying any new BD is a risk of losing the ability to watch the ones you already own without hunting for new keys... real fun

                    Serafean.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by brosis View Post
                      Buy Bluray disc.
                      Lay it to side, as you also purchased the right to play.
                      Torrent the video you need in bluray quality.
                      Enjoy.

                      If you sell the disc, your legal right is waived, so don't do that.
                      If you're within the US, going to get in lots of trouble promoting the distribution of copyrighted material.

                      Last time I checked within the US with a lawyer, merrily trying to watch your purchased copyrighted material was not against the law. Hence, it does go against the product license to try to break the encryption, but the seller did sell you the product with the intent of you watching correct? And is the owner of the material or the State going to complain as long as you're not exploiting the unencrypted material? However, distruting or profiting likely is, as you already mentioned. And merrily laying the unprotected copy aside for kids to access, justifies the "Ignorantia juris non excusat" or ignorance is not an excuse. (Hence, you can be guilty of distributing by carelessly leaving the unprotected media around the house with kids sharing with their friends.) Best to just refer people to lawyers if they have any questions when concerning what they can and cannot do with copyrighted material, or laws in general

                      However, as with most others, I & others tend to boycott the the Blu-ray industry or refrain from purchasing such items due to the overly zealous approach of copyrighting tactics. With DVD's, I never copied them unless the disk was damaged, which was rare if ever! Now with Blu-ray Movies, I have to copy every one and use makemkv in order to decrypt and watch. (This wastes hours of time, and incurs much frustration with my Linux operating system.) While in the process, I do make an unencrypted copy so I don't have to repeatedly perform this process over and over. A complete waste of mine and other innocent peoples' time! (Besides, it wastes energy to have to unencrypt media over and over, albeit little due to processors having hardware acceleration.)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Serafean View Post
                        Hi, I watch the couple bluray disks I have almost hassle free.
                        I followed the archwiki steps (libbluray, libaacs, putting KEYDB.CFG into the right place), then when I insert a BD I mount it, and xbmc plays it back no trouble. With mplayer you have to specify the mount directory. It's all on the wiki. (never tried with vlc) ... To sum up : you do not need to crack it, but buying any new BD is a risk of losing the ability to watch the ones you already own without hunting for new keys... real fun Serafean.
                        Those keys were revoked for the past year or so. People can no longer watch Blu-ray movies on Linux for the past year or so. Makemkv is the only, and last option for Linux users for watching Blu-ray movies. (I just don't like doing anything in Windows, and find life much easier within a Linux based operating system.)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I absolutely do not understand why anyone bothers to even buy these discs.

                          If it's that hard to use them LEGALLY... what's the point?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Kind of ironic since the first Blu-Ray player was basically an Intel PC with a Blu-Ray drive running Linux and almost all Blu-Ray players since 2008 are running embedded Linux.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sounds ironic, but it makes sense. The reason why you can't just watch Blu-ray movies on Linux is due to the usual case of OSS and DRM not living well together. To play back Blu-ray movies, VLC would have to buy a key from the Blu-ray consortium, and then not disclose the key to anyone which kind of goes against the whole notion of an OSS video player. Even then, the consortium wouldn't give VLC the key until they implement the whole HDCP support (so it only plays the video if your graphics card, cable and monitor are all secure), making sure it can't be disabled (again, not possible in OSS). Meanwhile, the Linux-based Blu-ray players have custom proprietary software that was certified by the Blu-ray consortium.

                              Technically someone would be able to create a closed-source Linux application that implements all the DRM that the Blu-ray consortium requires, then buy a key from them, and then Linux users would be able to play Blu-ray movies. But nobody is interested, because users would view such software with suspicion, and they key costs quite a bit, I think.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X