Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GNOME 3.12 To Plug Into Facebook In New Ways

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • GNOME 3.12 To Plug Into Facebook In New Ways

    Phoronix: GNOME 3.12 To Plug Into Facebook In New Ways

    GNOME applications are seeing greater integration support with Facebook in the GNOME 3.12 development cycle...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU0MjU

  • #2
    One more reason not to use Gnome. Now they integrate the CIA-NSA backed social network.

    Comment


    • #3
      I already quit Gnome3 for a while now. Gnome project is being driven deeper and deeper into the ocean of insanity by its obstinate devs.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by wargames View Post
        One more reason not to use Gnome. Now they integrate the CIA-NSA backed social network.
        Well, as long as they dont force you to log in it should be fine... (At least it's fine for me...)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by wargames View Post
          One more reason not to use Gnome. Now they integrate the CIA-NSA backed social network.
          It's only indexing for local use. If you've put it online, and it can be accessed with these crawlers then it gets added to the Tracker (the semantic data store and indexer) on your box. There's nothing in the least nefarious about this. This is not like Ubuntu, essentially, keylogging you. This info only stays local.
          Gnome is one group you don't have to worry about privacy concerns in the way you're thinking. I'd imagine it's the same for all the major linux desktops (excluding Unity...who knows that will go in there...but you can always look at the code at least).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by wargames View Post
            One more reason not to use Gnome. Now they integrate the CIA-NSA backed social network.
            I don't think GNOME can force anyone logging into or even using FB.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wargames View Post
              One more reason not to use Gnome. Now they integrate the CIA-NSA backed social network.
              You misunderstood the news... This is the other way around. This changes simply download the data you gave FB to your computer for local use. Essentially, your getting (a copy) of your data back -- Not, as if I thought this was useful for me in any way... but well, at least it's not evil.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes it is great to get a local copy of what others might put online about you. Its not like this will share anything with Gnome. The only thing I am somewhat worried about is if this data is encrypted? I never log into Facebook or Google without encryption and i would hate it if someone could snap this data out of the air when its sent back to me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sn3ipen View Post
                  Yes it is great to get a local copy of what others might put online about you. Its not like this will share anything with Gnome. The only thing I am somewhat worried about is if this data is encrypted? I never log into Facebook or Google without encryption and i would hate it if someone could snap this data out of the air when its sent back to me.
                  I'm guess those internet big players in the US have been forced to surrender copies of their TLS/SSL secret keys over to the NSA . Even if they don't have the keys, with the collaboration of browser and OS vendors the NSA can setup large scale man-in-the-middle attacks using SSL interception proxies. In anycase, if you're not careful about the cert authorities you trust, you'd be fooled by a false sense of security.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
                    Well, as long as they dont force you to log in it should be fine... (At least it's fine for me...)
                    It's not about logging in to facebook with gnome. It's about gnome sending requests to facebook.com once you start a session. This might happen in the backround without anybody noticing and should be enough for facebook to know your ip address and when you're using your computer.

                    But how do they know that that specific ip address belongs you? Very easy, once you've logged in to facebook.com (or probably even twitter.com) through other means than gnome3 (like your wifi connected iphone or the web), your ip will be automatically linked with your real name and email address. And everytime facebook recieves requests from your ip address your privacy is at stake.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by board View Post
                      It's not about logging in to facebook with gnome. It's about gnome sending requests to facebook.com once you start a session. This might happen in the backround without anybody noticing and should be enough for facebook to know your ip address and when you're using your computer.
                      [...]
                      Well, if you're a facebook user, don't you log in to facebook via your browser anyway? And thus, they should already have your IP...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hadrons123 View Post
                        Gnome project is being driven deeper and deeper into the ocean of insanity by its obstinate devs.
                        The other day I was reading the "bug" report where they decided that the two pane view in Nautilus was "too confusing" and it should be removed, and actually there were a lot of Gnome devs protesting that decision, and it was only 2 of them (the ones that were responsible for it) defending it against all the other dev's logic. However, the ones that made the decision were Nautilus maintainers, and the other ones weren't. I could see those that were protesting trying really really hard to restrain themselves from any insults and such, and actually presenting very valid arguments, but in the end it made no difference as we all know.

                        I have absolutely nothing against Gnome, except what they're doing to Nautilus. They're trying really hard to turn it into OSX's Finder which is one of the most useless file managers I've used.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Blocking Facebook

                          Originally posted by oleid View Post
                          Well, if you're a facebook user, don't you log in to facebook via your browser anyway? And thus, they should already have your IP...
                          If a computer is going to be used online, Facebook will get connection requests from sharing buttons that have infested other websites. If you want to deny Facebook your IP address you need to block social sharing buttonsd in Ghostery and/or NoScript. It's not enough to use a version of GNOME that never connects to them, as they are not the only problem.

                          If you do not use Facebook (I do not and never will!), I suggest 127.0.0.1 ing them out in /etc/hosts. If you ever need to access them to follow a link, grab a copy of Torbrowser and add an /etc/ directory to its directory. Drop another /etc/hosts in there without the Facebook block, and now only Torbrowser can connect to Facebook, and Facebook can't get your real IP address from a link, etc. Even if the NSA can sometimes and with great effort use Windows spyware to go around Tor, Facebook can't!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Luke View Post
                            If a computer is going to be used online, Facebook will get connection requests from sharing buttons that have infested other websites. If you want to deny Facebook your IP address you need to block social sharing buttonsd in Ghostery and/or NoScript. It's not enough to use a version of GNOME that never connects to them, as they are not the only problem.

                            If you do not use Facebook (I do not and never will!), I suggest 127.0.0.1 ing them out in /etc/hosts. If you ever need to access them to follow a link, grab a copy of Torbrowser and add an /etc/ directory to its directory. Drop another /etc/hosts in there without the Facebook block, and now only Torbrowser can connect to Facebook, and Facebook can't get your real IP address from a link, etc. Even if the NSA can sometimes and with great effort use Windows spyware to go around Tor, Facebook can't!
                            What are you trying to tell me? This facebook option for gnome 3.12 is opt-in. If you decide to enable it, and thus make compontents of gnome to log in to facebook, I doubt that they'll get new information - maybe apart from the information that you use the gnome desktop - as facebook users tend to log in to facebook from their current location. They probably won't get a new IP from you, as they got your IP from logins done via your browser or your mobile phone, which is probably behind the same NAT router than your computer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It sounds to me like an attempt to empower users with data mining capabilities and making it easier for users to interact with Fb on something closer to their own terms. The actual application of this is probably of value only to people with intermittent Internet connectivity, but the fact that it exists I think is a positive development and hopefully will encourage other technical development with such goals.

                              As long as this is an opt-in feature, I do not see what harm it is doing - no one's privacy is being invaded by default - and there are potential benefits to those who use Fb. Those of us who don't use Fb need not be concerned anyway.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X