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Using KWin To Power Other Non-KDE Linux Desktops

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  • Using KWin To Power Other Non-KDE Linux Desktops

    Phoronix: Using KWin To Power Other Non-KDE Linux Desktops

    For those interested in ditching Compiz or other window managers in favor of KDE's KWin, it is actually possible to do so and use KWin on your favorite non-KDE desktop...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTUyNzk

  • #2
    LXDE-Qt?

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    • #3
      I prefer compton which is a liteweight compiz replacement and provides a flickering and tear free experience that feels so smooth as using wayland but still on X

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tiger_Coder View Post
        LXDE-Qt?
        They shown interest in picking KWin5 up in the future, however nothing is set in stone. For now they still use OpenBox.

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        • #5
          I smell a set of new distros brewing.

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          • #6
            Excellent! In the future I will remove xorg-server, install Wayland and use it as a window manager. But for now, I'll stuck with X11 and my Fluxbox wm. Hope this come soon in Gentoo! :-)

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            • #7
              That's funny because I just started using kde4 over kde3.5 with the new OpenSuSE 13.1 release. Besides how settings are handled and having to install stealth cashew, I'm really impressed with how smooth and stable everything runs on my ThinkPad with a i5/HD4000. I still miss my old 3.5 but it is really starting to show it's age.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jmcharron View Post
                That's funny because I just started using kde4 over kde3.5 with the new OpenSuSE 13.1 release. Besides how settings are handled and having to install stealth cashew, I'm really impressed with how smooth and stable everything runs on my ThinkPad with a i5/HD4000. I still miss my old 3.5 but it is really starting to show it's age.
                Welcome to the 21st century! Kde 4 should be a way better experience on that harwadre that 3.5.

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                • #9
                  I want a broken, buggy POS to power my other desktop, okay, yeah... lol

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                  • #10
                    KWin is the main reason which I'm not using KDE Plasma Workspaces anymore. In my case (GeForce GT 630 with nVidia proprietary driver0, KWin results in a lot of tearing in games, videos and in its effects, it has a poor performance and it is very buggy. So, as compositing window manager, it's a bad solution for me. I prefer to use Mutter in Plasma Workspackes rather than KWin.

                    And this is list of the packges to install together with KWin in openSUSE (excluding the recommended packages).

                    Code:
                    appmenu-qt cln kactivities4 kde4-filesystem kde4-kgreeter-plugins kdebase4-runtime kdebase4-runtime-branding-openSUSE kdebase4-workspace 
                      kdebase4-workspace-branding-openSUSE kdebase4-workspace-ksysguardd kdebase4-workspace-liboxygenstyle kdelibs4 kdelibs4-branding-openSUSE 
                      kdelibs4-core kdepimlibs4 kscreen ksplashx-branding-openSUSE kwin libakonadi4 libakonadiprotocolinternals1 libattica0_4 libdbusmenu-qt2 
                      libdmtx0 libepub0 libgps20 libkactivities6 libkde4 libkdecore4 libkdepimlibs4 libkscreen libkscreen1 libksuseinstall1 libphonon4 
                      libpolkit-qt-1-1 libpoppler-qt4-4 libprison0 libqalculate5 libqca2 libqimageblitz4 libqjson0 libqt4-qt3support libsoprano4 libssh4 
                      libstrigi0 libwayland-egl1 libxcb-composite0 libxcb-damage0 libxcb-image0 libxcb-keysyms1 libxcb-randr0 libxcb-shape0 libxcb-sync0 
                      libxcb-xtest0 libzip2 nepomuk-core oxygen-icon-theme polkit-kde-agent-1 shared-desktop-ontologies soprano soprano-backend-redland 
                      susegreeter-branding-openSUSE

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Panix View Post
                      I want a broken, buggy POS to power my other desktop, okay, yeah... lol
                      I guess you are a Gnome user?

                      Seriously, people using WMs like Openbox instead of KDE usually do that because they don't need and/or want fancy effects or compositing (possibly due to hardware restrictions, possibly due to personal taste). What has Kwin to offer for those people that they should consider a switch?
                      There are no advantages that I can see.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                        Seriously, people using WMs like Openbox instead of KDE usually do that because they don't need and/or want fancy effects or compositing (possibly due to hardware restrictions, possibly due to personal taste). What has Kwin to offer for those people that they should consider a switch?
                        There are no advantages that I can see.
                        If you are using Wayland, you are using compositing. So anyone wanting to use Wayland in the future is going to need a compositing window manager.

                        But beyond that, kwin offers a lot. Scripting, fine-grained control of the behavior of individual windows, window and application-specific rules and overrides, advanced focus behavior control and protection, window tabbing, and tiling. Plus it has the advantage that it is well-tested and widely-used, which saves the work of making and maintaining their own window manager. Further, thinks like desktop effects are modular so they can be easily stripped out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
                          But beyond that, kwin offers a lot. Scripting, fine-grained control of the behavior of individual windows, window and application-specific rules and overrides, advanced focus behavior control and protection, window tabbing, and tiling. Plus it has the advantage that it is well-tested and widely-used, which saves the work of making and maintaining their own window manager. Further, thinks like desktop effects are modular so they can be easily stripped out.
                          All of that do I have already with the i3 WM, but with a lot less resource usage, so I wouldn't see that as advantage, but it is of course to each its own.
                          It is just that I see no compelling reason to use Kwin instead of one of the other WMs.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                            All of that do I have already with the i3 WM, but with a lot less resource usage, so I wouldn't see that as advantage, but it is of course to each its own.
                            It is just that I see no compelling reason to use Kwin instead of one of the other WMs.
                            As far as I can find, i3 wm is a dedicated tiling window manager. This at its core makes it much, much, much less flexible than kwin (which can be tiling but isn't required to be). Also, because it is a tiling window manager, there is much less it has to do, so of course it uses less resources. That also means that its scripting interface is extremely limited compared to kwin's. Further, it doesn't seem to have a mechanism to trigger scripts on particular events, rather than just polling (which is an extremely wasteful and likely laggy approach especially since "scripting" seems to be handled by an IPC rather than integrated directly into the wm like with kwin). So there is no way you can write a script that turns w3 into a conventional wm, unlike kwin where the scripting interface for kwin is powerful enough to allow tiling to be implemented as a script.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
                              As far as I can find, i3 wm is a dedicated tiling window manager. This at its core makes it much, much, much less flexible than kwin (which can be tiling but isn't required to be). Also, because it is a tiling window manager, there is much less it has to do, so of course it uses less resources. That also means that its scripting interface is extremely limited compared to kwin's. Further, it doesn't seem to have a mechanism to trigger scripts on particular events, rather than just polling (which is an extremely wasteful and likely laggy approach especially since "scripting" seems to be handled by an IPC rather than integrated directly into the wm like with kwin). So there is no way you can write a script that turns w3 into a conventional wm, unlike kwin where the scripting interface for kwin is powerful enough to allow tiling to be implemented as a script.
                              i3 supports floating windows (so it can be used as conventional WM, though that doesn't make much sense), events are indeed limited by default to "window opens", but this can be extended, AFAIK. I never noticed lag, even with complicated configurations.

                              Anyways, i3 was just an example, because that is the WM I know best. I doubt that there aren't WMs with the same capabilities in the stacking WM croud.

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