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GNOME Gets A Log Viewer For Systemd's Journal

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  • GNOME Gets A Log Viewer For Systemd's Journal

    Phoronix: GNOME Gets A Log Viewer For Systemd's Journal

    There's a new GNOME application that experienced its first release this morning: GNOME Logs. While there's a lot of work left on the project, GNOME Logs is to serve as a centralized log viewer for the systemd journal on the GNOME desktop...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ3MzE

  • #2
    Originally posted by Honton View Post
    How nice. Systemd is only optional for Gnome, but stuff like this makes the choice much easier.
    Uses glibc, which means CLA.

    Time to pick something else, funky.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Honton View Post
      Too bad you failed to differ between CA and CLA.
      Even worse for you.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Honton View Post
        What do I care anyway? You are off topic because Gnome and systemd is actively opposed to CLA.
        They actively build on software which requires copyright assignment to a third party and whose license can change at any time.

        Just like KDE.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
          They actively build on software which requires copyright assignment to a third party and whose license can change at any time.

          Just like KDE.
          Eh... what? Do you mean GNU? So you think the Free Software Foundation would make all their software proprietary?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
            Uses glibc, which means CLA.

            Time to pick something else, funky.
            Did you actually check this, or did you just assume your silly troll was at least _technically_ accurate?

            Most C code, especially high level GUI apps, doesn't specify a particular C library. So far as I can make out, neither systemd nor GNOME nor anything else mentioned in this article has a specific requirement for the glibc C library.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by numasan View Post
              Eh... what? Do you mean GNU? So you think the Free Software Foundation would make all their software proprietary?
              No, and I don't think Digia would either.

              It's funkstar and his copyright assignment paranoia you have to convince.

              Originally posted by AdamW
              So far as I can make out, neither systemd nor GNOME nor anything else mentioned in this article has a specific requirement for the glibc C library.
              I didn't claim it specified a requirement, I said they used the GNU libc, which is accurate for most Linux distributions. Including the one funkstar runs.

              I apologise for the trollish post, but funkstar tends to provoke it with his hypocritical crusade against anything that's not GNOME.

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              • #8
                It's amazing how predictable Honton is! The only thing I guessed wrong on is that he would spout his bullshit on the Pitivi article.

                Related to the article: Good for GNOME I've just recently started using a distro with SystemD (Linux Mint uses Upstart... ) so the journals and stuff is foreign to me. Having a GUI would probably ease the transition by a lot.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Honton View Post
                  You are forgiven. Still I find it pretty funny you decided to troll this thread to pieces. No one mentioned anything about CLA until you decided it was time to show the world you can't tell the difference between Commercial CLA and FSF CA.
                  Not sure what you're after, Qt or something else. Anyway: GNOME does not want CA or CLA. We say that we're part of GNU. However, nobody assigns their copyright to anyone and that practice is discouraged. See also https://wiki.gnome.org/CopyrightAssignment/Guidelines and https://wiki.gnome.org/CopyrightAssignment.

                  Note that above wiki mentions: With the Release Team and Board of Directors carefully applying these criteria, the GNOME Foundation hopes to keep the GNOME project unencumbered by control structures that do not align with the spirit of the GNOME community. and that I am on the GNOME release team.

                  Now glibc using CLA or CA also has nothing to do with GNOME. We're not a deritative.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
                    so the journals and stuff is foreign to me. Having a GUI would probably ease the transition by a lot.
                    Journal is really cool because a lot of things are indexed. If you check the design for this Logs application, you'll see that the idea is that the journal would distinguish between the various applications and log their output. Meaning: no need to ask people to run some command in the terminal or look at stuff like ~/.cache/gdm/session.log (lately if not using journal) or ~/.xsession-errors (older), etc. Everything would be captured by default

                    Note: journal lately is a bit slow on my install, so that must be fixed. It used to be ok, guess some kind of regression.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Honton View Post
                      You are forgiven. Still I find it pretty funny you decided to troll this thread to pieces. No one mentioned anything about CLA until you decided it was time to show the world you can't tell the difference between Commercial CLA and FSF CA.

                      Now can we get back to the topic? Gnome gains a log viewer for the most detailed logging mechanism for Linux. AdamW, do you think this will impact distribution quality?
                      I wouldn't see it as having much of a direct impact, really. It'll be useful for sysadmins, I guess. But you can already do all sorts of stuff with journalctl, this is mostly just making it more obvious and available to those who haven't bothered to look into journalctl's capabilities or are uncomfortable with a command line, really.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bkor View Post
                        Journal is really cool because a lot of things are indexed. If you check the design for this Logs application, you'll see that the idea is that the journal would distinguish between the various applications and log their output. Meaning: no need to ask people to run some command in the terminal or look at stuff like ~/.cache/gdm/session.log (lately if not using journal) or ~/.xsession-errors (older), etc. Everything would be captured by default

                        Note: journal lately is a bit slow on my install, so that must be fixed. It used to be ok, guess some kind of regression.
                        The journal grows over time, like any system log. Its backing files are rotated, like any system log. But unlike most logs, when you just call journalctl with no arguments, you get _the whole thing_, from day 0, whenever you turned journald on. If you've been running your system for a while, especially if you're a typical dev or tinkerer who runs (or writes...) busted stuff from time to time, it's likely your journal is _huge_. (You can see how huge by doing a 'du' in /var/log/journal). Any time you just run 'journalctl' and hit End, or something similar, journalctl has to iterate over the entire XXGB of data you have in there, which is why it gets slow.

                        There's various things you can do about this. If you don't care about logs from months ago, you can happily just wipe the older files in /var/log/journal; just look at the file dates to see what date ranges each file covers. You can also just use smarter journalctl commands. The one I use the most often is 'journalctl -b', which is 'show me all messages since I booted'. You can also pass in absolute or relative date ranges (like 'all logs in the last week') and stuff, if you check the man page.

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                        • #13
                          Looks like another project that wisely follows Apple's approach to its log viewing service.

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                          • #14
                            I thought systemd was OK until they added that journal abomination. Now I wish systemd never existed.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Honton View Post
                              And let us hate systemd despite we all know it is the standard today.

                              Tldr: systemd rants are so 2010, move on and accept the new standard.
                              You still fail to tell us why systemd exactly is a standard if the most used distributions don't use it.

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