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Mozilla Firefox 23.0 Now In Beta With New Features

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  • Mozilla Firefox 23.0 Now In Beta With New Features

    Phoronix: Mozilla Firefox 23.0 Now In Beta With New Features

    Mozilla has put Firefox 23 now in their beta channel for those wanting to test this next feature update to the open-source web-browser...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM5ODQ

  • #2
    Firefox 23 with h.264 support on Linux
    Kernel 3.10 with Radeon UVD support
    Kernel 3.11 with Radeon DPM support
    KDE 4.11 with some of the biggest changes (I think) in a long time

    The next 2-3months are gonna be very interesting for the OSS community haha

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Ericg View Post
      Firefox 23 with h.264 support on Linux
      Kernel 3.10 with Radeon UVD support
      Kernel 3.11 with Radeon DPM support
      KDE 4.11 with some of the biggest changes (I think) in a long time

      The next 2-3months are gonna be very interesting for the OSS community haha
      Interesting times for sure. And with wayland coming things get more interesting i believe.

      BTW i like that in the release notes that the announcement of the removal of blink element blinks

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      • #4
        Micheal, if you would read the bug rapport at https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=794282, you would notice that the target milestone is Firefox 24, not 23.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wpoely86 View Post
          Micheal, if you would read the bug rapport at https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=794282, you would notice that the target milestone is Firefox 24, not 23.
          God damn it wpoely -.- stop crushing our dreams!

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          • #6
            new javascript compiler, too

            FF 23 includes the new baseline compiler, meant to replace jaegermonkey and integrate more closely with IonMonkey.

            https://blog.mozilla.org/javascript/...er-has-landed/
            Last edited by smitty3268; 06-28-2013, 02:55 PM.

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            • #7
              man in the middle

              The other wording could a c/c++ attack!
              ;-)

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              • #8
                'main-in-the-middle attachs' should be 'man-in-the-middle attacks'.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                  FF 23 includes the new baseline compiler, meant to replace jaegermonkey and integrate more closely with IonMonkey.

                  https://blog.mozilla.org/javascript/...er-has-landed/
                  This is what I've been waiting for.

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                  • #10
                    >Blink removed


                    And the beast shall come forth surrounded by a roiling cloud of vengeance. The house of the unbelievers shall be razed and they shall be scorched to the earth. Their tags shall blink until the end of days.
                    - from The Book of Mozilla, 12:10

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                    • #11
                      - Mozilla's Social Share API functionality is now exposed to developers.
                      Does this mean we are also going to get new html tags instead off custom share panels?
                      Hate those custom share panels, the static nature of hard coding social sharing sites is a disaster.
                      Would like to have social html tags such as a sharing panel.

                      They seem to not have heard of the h-online approach, the Mozilla devs should take an example from this:
                      http://www.h-online.com/features/Two...y-1783256.html

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                      • #12
                        Something to note about the new mixed content blocking:
                        it potentially breaks viewing certain sites with addons like HTTPS Everywhere:
                        https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=878890
                        They're working on a bugfix, but so far it remains unresolved afaik.

                        For those to lazy to follow the link:
                        Basically, even if HTTPS Everywhere redirects unsecure elements to their secure counterparts (e.g. makes example.com css loaded from http://example.com/example.css redirect to https://example.com/example.css), Firefox interprets the loaded page as having mixed content, and blocks the redirected elements, probably breaking the page design.

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                        • #13
                          Poor blink

                          Why did they kill <blink>? It had never harmed anyone! Well, not more than 3-D clocks with spinning globules following the mouse pointer, or swirling GIF snowflakes eating 75% of the CPU. So why did <blink> get all the hate? What shall we do next, inspect all CSS and remove questionable choices of background and text colour? Suppress the use of fonts of dubious taste? Institute a W3C validator for the fancyness of web pages?

                          Poor <blink>, with your untimely passing away, it's an era that comes to an end. I'll miss you.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by peppepz View Post
                            Why did they kill <blink>? It had never harmed anyone! Well, not more than 3-D clocks with spinning globules following the mouse pointer, or swirling GIF snowflakes eating 75% of the CPU. So why did <blink> get all the hate? What shall we do next, inspect all CSS and remove questionable choices of background and text colour? Suppress the use of fonts of dubious taste? Institute a W3C validator for the fancyness of web pages?e

                            Poor <blink>, with your untimely passing away, it's an era that comes to an end. I'll miss you.
                            And there's no browser out there that still supports it? Firefox is not the only browser around.
                            This is an example: lynx browser org, I know nothing other about this browser, than that I have used it a bit when my X.org crashed once for good, and I was like in the dark with a lighted match.
                            Last edited by powdigsig; 06-29-2013, 02:58 AM. Reason: Maybe bad example

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                            • #15
                              Can't disable JavaScript any more

                              On a side note, I just discovered that you can no longer disable JavaScript in Firefox 23. The reason is fear that a stupid user could navigate deeply into the advanced preferences dialog box, disable JavaScript in there, see that the internets are no longer working for him, become more stupid during the process as to not being able to navigate into the preferences dialog box and turn JavaScript on again, and then recover his smartness at least for the time required to file a bug report to Mozilla about the internet being broken.

                              A modest proposal to Mozilla: just disable the preferences dialog box, all of it. Advanced users can still manage their preferences through about:config, while non-technical users will be obviously scared away by the disclaimer they get when they try to get in there. You will decrease your support burden this way. Well, possibly your user base too, depending on whether you have more users who like to customise their browsing experience to the point of replacing the built-in browser which was comfortably installed by default on their operating system, or you have more users that disable JavaScript and then submit bug reports.
                              </rant>

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