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  • #11
    Originally posted by brosis View Post
    Wrong! For RO sharing - PDF. For RW sharing - ODT.
    And embedded Fonts are now Specified in ODF? I don't think so.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Awesomeness View Post
      As I said: They deliberately chose a license against the principles of Apache to ensure code transfer is a one-way street.
      It's exactly the same tactic Apple used in the past: Taking code from the BSDs and release modifications only under Apple Public Source License.
      It's legal in case of the Apache License but it's also pathetic (just as pathetic as adopting the sidebar the LO developers just a few weeks ago claimed was not available under a free license and IBM donated nothing and everything was just a marketing bluff, yaddayaddayadda).
      The whole point of Apache/BSD/MIT licence is to allow others to take the code and release it under a different licence. IBM pushed for Oracle to release OOo as Apache (presumably so that they can release closed source derivatives). If you want to be sure that derivatives stay licence compatible, then there are several licences that achieve that.

      If you leave your bicycle unlocked on the street with a note that says 'feel free to take me', then you can't be surprised or cross when someone does.

      Also LO was forked in 2010, when OOo was only available under GPL (or sun licence). How were the LO developers supposed to switch it to a permissive licence when they did not own the copyright. Later in 2011 AOO was released under the Apache licence. So you could just as easily say "The AOO developers deliberately chose a licence so that they could not use LO code"

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Awesomeness View Post
        As I said: They deliberately chose a license against the principles of Apache to ensure code transfer is a one-way street.
        Pure lie period.
        LibreOffice was formed in September (?) 2010, when a large group of OpenOffice developers decided to redraw from **Oracle's** (!!!) OpenOffice.org due to Sun's (and Oracle's) *restrictive* copyright assignment and due to Sun/Oracle more-or-less ignoring the so called Community Council (that was supposed to manage OpenOffice.org, at least as far as I know).
        **Apache** OpenOffice was formed in, wait for it, December 2011, when Oracle decided its time to dump OpenOffice.org.

        Now, please feel free to explain how LibreOffice chose "deliberately chose a license that goes against the principles of [OpenOffice.org *] Apache", when Apache OpenOffice.org was formed more than a year (!) after LibreOffice was formed?

        ... But hey, don't let the fact confuse you.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by gilboa View Post
          ... But hey, don't let the fact confuse you.
          +1

          To original poster: "Advocating" Apache OpenOffice.org by attacking LibreOffice. Seems to happen on various sites (noticed also on LWN.net). Try maybe promoting your own product? Suggest stopping the bullshit about LibreOffice. Totally incorrect and makes you look like an idiot.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Nille View Post
            And embedded Fonts are now Specified in ODF? I don't think so.
            I do think so, otherwise how are you going to implement that?
            The point is to be able to use exotic fonts and be sure that the documents on other machine are finally displaying properly, without having to ship individual fonts along and ask the receiver to mess with the font installation.
            Probability that this feature is required or there is butthurt due to its absence is 100%, once there is need for documents to leave the machine they were created on.
            Imagine creating a ODT document on your Linux machine (Liberation fonts) and then submitting it to windows machine (has no Liberation, only msfonts), *both* using LibreOffice. The formatting is guaranteed to break! The document is guaranteed to look ugly!

            The only roadblock for this feature is font licenses, but a LOT of people cried out loud - let this be the document owner headache. Similar to that owner should decide with music he can share instead of cutting file copy operation for music files from PC. Looks like finally the cries have been heard!
            Last edited by brosis; 06-05-2013, 08:12 AM.

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            • #16
              Openoffice supports embedding fonts because svg makes this possible.
              There could be better support for this feature that would make it a bit more practical. More support for this feature however doesn't change the fact that embedding fonts with odf is already possible from as early as odf 1.0.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Nille View Post
                Only if other Programs can use them too. but i doubt that this will happen. Its nice if you only use LO but if you want to share the Documents with the World its still sux.
                How about spelling properly when saying something "sucks"? People can install LibreOffice on their PCs too, you know?

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                • #18
                  With all due respect to LibreOffice, wouldn't most Linux users prefer a markup tool like markdown, Sphinx, or LaTeX?

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Awesomeness View Post
                    No. LibreOffice has the explicit policy to release own developments (even if these are only modifications to files imported from OO) under licenses that are incompatible with Apache policies.
                    LibreOffice releases their code under dual MPL/LGPL license, however they don't have copyright assignment so the author is not precluded from releasing his code under the Apache License too. And a number of authors choose to do so, to allow both AOO and LO to benefit from their work.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by DanLamb View Post
                      With all due respect to LibreOffice, wouldn't most Linux users prefer a markup tool like markdown, Sphinx, or LaTeX?
                      Users increasingly prefer different tools, the desktop market itself is in decline. Abandoning WYSIWYG is however not an option for most.

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