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Microsoft Releases Skype For Linux 4.2, Has Bug-Fixes

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  • Microsoft Releases Skype For Linux 4.2, Has Bug-Fixes

    Phoronix: Microsoft Releases Skype For Linux 4.2, Has Bug-Fixes

    Microsoft has finally done the Skype for Linux 4.2 update, which rolls in a bunch of bug-fixes but still doesn't put the Linux Skype client on par with OS X or Windows...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM3NjM

  • #2
    From what I gather WebRTC is a new competing solution to Skype by allowing a web developer to create relatively easily web-based skype alternatives, right?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mark45 View Post
      From what I gather WebRTC is a new competing solution to Skype by allowing a web developer to create relatively easily web-based skype alternatives, right?
      Pretty much, maybe not encrypted (it could probably be done, just i dont think mandated by the standard), maybe not screensharing, but voice calls? video calls? Yes

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ericg View Post
        Pretty much, maybe not encrypted (it could probably be done, just i dont think mandated by the standard), maybe not screensharing, but voice calls? video calls? Yes
        Skype isn't as encrypted as you think. MS decrypts everything on their servers, although it it's good enough to keep your average neighborhood script kiddy out. (See recent Ars article for details).

        WebRTC is still in major flux and has a long way to go before it will actually be able to compete with Skype, but yes that's the general idea of where it's heading.

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        • #5
          careful with skype. It's eavesdropping. -> http://www.h-online.com/security/new...e-1862870.html
          http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2013/May/78

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          • #6
            Google Talk (XMPP) already exists and fills that niche. The problem is that most people are using Skype, and you can't persuade them to go use Google Talk instead...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ericg View Post
              Pretty much, maybe not encrypted (it could probably be done, just i dont think mandated by the standard), maybe not screensharing, but voice calls? video calls? Yes
              Screensharing, filesharing etc is actually there in WebRTC. When it becomes more mature, we will have real competition in our hands again.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                Google Talk (XMPP) already exists and fills that niche. The problem is that most people are using Skype, and you can't persuade them to go use Google Talk instead...
                huh? I thought they removed XMPP from GoogleTalk?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Detructor View Post
                  huh? I thought they removed XMPP from GoogleTalk?
                  It's now called "Hangout" and is using their own protocol.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by droste View Post
                    It's now called "Hangout" and is using their own protocol.
                    Well, not quite. XMPP for client to client is still supported for text chats and this is an important piece for interoperability with other clients like Pidgin and Adium. What has been dropped is server side federation. Unfortunate, but not the end of the world.

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                    • #11
                      And yes guys, I know that MS can at least partially decrypt messages. I read the article. But the article even mentions itself that its not sure what EXACTLY is going on. MS may be "eavesdropping" on the decrypted messages on the received end, not on the sent end or the middle-man. Its an important note because it decides whether or not they CAN break the encryption. Thats why I -AM- really hopeful for WebRTC.

                      What I havent yet figured out is how its gonna work... Is it gonna be IP based? Is everyone getting a WebRTC account now and signing into browsers? I'm all for Filesharing, video calls, screensharing, etc, in HTML and JS, im fine with it. But the "Who's Who?" question is a big one and I havent seen an answer yet (Admittedly, I may have just missed it. Links would be appreciated in that case )

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                      • #12
                        Whether or not MS has the ability to eavesdrop shouldn't be of anyone's concern. First of all, I highly doubt they have their own employees listening in on every convo you have. Even if they do, what are they going to do about it? If you're not doing anything illegal, it might be an invasion of privacy but they can't do anything to you. Same goes for companies like google keeping track of your searches. What makes you think a multi-billion dollar companies cares about what type of porn you like?

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                        • #13
                          Really, Google Talk is moving away from XMPP/Jingle? Oh come on.
                          What does that leave us with, talking about desktop VOIP applications? SIP/SIMPLE?

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                          • #14
                            @Ericg:

                            there are no WebRTC accounts. When your browser wants to connect to another browser, it generates a little JSON object that contains all neccessary information for the other browser to connect to you. The WebRTC standard does not define how that JSON goes from one browser to another, so it's up to the JS to do that via AJAX/Websockets to central server, WebP2P connections to a third browser; essentialy you could even read out the JSON on the phone and have the other person type it into a textbox on the html page. If neccessary, a pre-configured server is involved to break through NATs. html5rocks has a nice explanation: http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutoria...#toc-signaling

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dstaubsauger View Post
                              @Ericg:

                              there are no WebRTC accounts. When your browser wants to connect to another browser, it generates a little JSON object that contains all neccessary information for the other browser to connect to you. The WebRTC standard does not define how that JSON goes from one browser to another, so it's up to the JS to do that via AJAX/Websockets to central server, WebP2P connections to a third browser; essentialy you could even read out the JSON on the phone and have the other person type it into a textbox on the html page. If neccessary, a pre-configured server is involved to break through NATs. html5rocks has a nice explanation: http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutoria...#toc-signaling
                              Thanks dstaub

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