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Colord 1.0 Released To Manage Open-Source Colors

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  • Colord 1.0 Released To Manage Open-Source Colors

    Phoronix: Colord 1.0 Released To Manage Open-Source Colors

    Colord 1.0.0 has been released as the system service/daemon that makes it easy and straight forward for managing/installing/creating color profiles for managing colors on Linux input and output devices...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM3MDk

  • #2
    So.... explain this like I'm 8, what does this mean to a user?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dh04000 View Post
      So.... explain this like I'm 8, what does this mean to a user?
      Graphic professionals such as artists who work in industry where things needs to look the same on screen as on print use color calibrated displays using ICC profiles.

      With colord you can load ICC profiles so that your monitor is color calibrated so that the colors are accurately displayed so that they look the same on the display as they will appear in the print when they print it on magazines.

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      • #4
        Deep color

        Does Linux, DRM, DRI, X.org, Wayland support deep color?
        Colors more than 8 bits per channel?
        Like 10-bit colors or 12-bit colors.
        Like monitors panels and graphics card with 30-bit, 36-bit, 48-bit bpp.

        Does it support scRGB and xvYCC?

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        • #5
          This will probably be merged in systemd.

          Seriously, why daemon is needed for this?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            Graphic professionals such as artists who work in industry where things needs to look the same on screen as on print use color calibrated displays using ICC profiles.

            With colord you can load ICC profiles so that your monitor is color calibrated so that the colors are accurately displayed so that they look the same on the display as they will appear in the print when they print it on magazines.
            By the sound of it, it seems very useful for any graphic designer. Is this a standard feature in linux competitors (ie Win and OSX)?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dh04000 View Post
              By the sound of it, it seems very useful for any graphic designer. Is this a standard feature in linux competitors (ie Win and OSX)?
              Yes but not availably widely in Linux or integrated with the popular desktop environments till colord was created. Richard Hughes (Red Hat) is the author and maintainer of it.

              @lightbit, it is activated on demand by D-Bus. It needs to be a deamon to satisfy some of the use cases listed in the colord site.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dh04000 View Post
                By the sound of it, it seems very useful for any graphic designer. Is this a standard feature in linux competitors (ie Win and OSX)?
                Yes. This is why monitors come with a "driver" CD most of the time. It's to install the correct ICC profile for that monitor in Windows. Or if you don't install that, it's why Windows Update installs a monitor "driver" after you connect a new monitor. You get a monitor inf file, which provides possible overrides for broken EDIDs (it's cheaper to override in an INF file that fix the EDID in the monitor) and an ICC profile.
                Last edited by RealNC; 05-13-2013, 06:24 PM.

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                • #9
                  A link to http://www.hughski.com/index.html would have been useful, so here it is anyway.

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                  • #10
                    Linux graphics applications (GIMP, Krita) already have colour management, but it would be nice to get it for the whole desktop.

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                    • #11
                      A good point to note is that the EDID specification is pretty much crap.
                      Normally needing a driver CD with an inf file would be unnecessary if you could just have a configuration file specified and a way to get it through the display connector.
                      Many manufacturers make errors in their EDID implementation.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by plonoma View Post
                        A good point to note is that the EDID specification is pretty much crap.
                        Normally needing a driver CD with an inf file would be unnecessary if you could just have a configuration file specified and a way to get it through the display connector.
                        Many manufacturers make errors in their EDID implementation.
                        Any manufacturer with a reputation of crappy EDID implementation?
                        Any manufacturer with a reputation of good EDID implementation?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                          Any manufacturer with a reputation of crappy EDID implementation?
                          Any manufacturer with a reputation of good EDID implementation?
                          The implementation is *always* good. The problem is the reported data (for example my monitor's EDID does not report a 50Hz mode, even though it supports it.) And it varies by monitor model, not by manufacturer.

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                          • #14
                            Not just professionals, people with cheap panels benefit from color calibration.

                            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                            Graphic professionals such as artists who work in industry where things needs to look the same on screen as on print use color calibrated displays using ICC profiles.

                            With colord you can load ICC profiles so that your monitor is color calibrated so that the colors are accurately displayed so that they look the same on the display as they will appear in the print when they print it on magazines.
                            There is another use: Cheap/badly colored panels. I have such panel, a Samsung T220, which might come with any of 4 different panels each exhibiting different color gamuts, but this is impossible to find out for the end user before purchase. The worst of them is made in china and its the one i have. Apparently there is a much better one made in Korea, etc. You can find out by reaching a hidden menu, but some models won't even expose that, and people can only find out which panel they got by opening the thing.

                            It looks horrible without calibration, but after calibration with a Huey instrument and dispcalgui/argyllcms its acceptable. Problem is, a few programs like to reset the colors for some reason (usually when quitting), so i always keep dispcalgui open and reload the profile from time to time when such thing occurs (this panel looks plain ugly without the color correction profile i made).

                            So Iím not a professional, don't work in the industry or even design web pages and yet can't stand this panel without color calibration to watch the occasional movie, play game or watch pics. I just want to see things closer to the colors intended, or at least like a good CRT. And no, calibration by eye doesn't do squat, thank goodness i got that Huey, even if i have to stick the thing with tape when i need to re-calibrate (hardly ever )

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                              Does Linux, DRM, DRI, X.org, Wayland support deep color?
                              Colors more than 8 bits per channel?
                              Like 10-bit colors or 12-bit colors.
                              Like monitors panels and graphics card with 30-bit, 36-bit, 48-bit bpp.

                              Does it support scRGB and xvYCC?
                              IIRC 10 Bit color is also a requirement of the 4K/QFHD video standard. IIRC it also has an option for 12 bit color.

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