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Mozilla & Samsung Develop "Servo" Browser Engine

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  • #16
    I wonder if this is a move to get Firefox included as the default browser with Tizen?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by BW~Merlin View Post
      I wonder if this is a move to get Firefox included as the default browser with Tizen?
      Tizen??? Whats that???



      ... yeah, I'm just poking fun.

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      • #18
        Funny that now they are so keen switching their browser engine. I remember a discussion if they should switch to webkit and one of the core arguments against was that all addons would need to be rewritten. Well but the same applies when they switch to Servo of course....

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Nuc!eoN View Post
          Funny that now they are so keen switching their browser engine. I remember a discussion if they should switch to webkit and one of the core arguments against was that all addons would need to be rewritten. Well but the same applies when they switch to Servo of course....
          Difference being that they are making Servo so they can make it compatible with existing addons.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Calinou View Post
            They allow third party cookies, do not enable "do not track" by default and use Google as default search engine. On top of that, they frequently promote Facebook, Twitter or such. Seems legit.

            no third party cookies break some sites. do not track by default would kill the standard. google is the best most well known search engine.

            All of which have on/off choices available.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Ericg View Post
              no third party cookies break some sites. do not track by default would kill the standard. google is the best most well known search engine.

              All of which have on/off choices available.
              I did not realize DNT got standardized. The last time I checked in on it I came away with the impression that it would be several more years before the interested parties could come to an agreement.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                no third party cookies break some sites.
                Indeed. But by turning it on by default they would make a statement, and probably most of those breaking sites would get fixed in months.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Serge View Post
                  I did not realize DNT got standardized. The last time I checked in on it I came away with the impression that it would be several more years before the interested parties could come to an agreement.
                  Yes the DNT header has been standarized. Chrome ships with it available, Firefox ships with it available, IE ships with it turned on by default. The problem is it is supposed to represent a CHOICE by the user, and the advertisers are supposed to respect that choice. If everyone shipped with it turned on by default it would no longer be representing a choice and the advertisers would lose their only reason to abide by it...good will and respect of choice.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                    Yes the DNT header has been standarized. Chrome ships with it available, Firefox ships with it available, IE ships with it turned on by default. The problem is it is supposed to represent a CHOICE by the user, and the advertisers are supposed to respect that choice. If everyone shipped with it turned on by default it would no longer be representing a choice and the advertisers would lose their only reason to abide by it...good will and respect of choice.
                    Yeah, when IE10 shipped with it on, i heard that most advertisers decided to ignore it. I'm not sure whatever happened with that, but their logic was that it was supposed to be an active choice by the user, not a default.

                    Of course, what they really meant was that it was only supposed to impact the single digit percent of people who really care about their privacy enough to change a setting, and not the masses.

                    Chrome, on the other hand, had to be dragged kicking and screaming into supporting DNT at all. It was pretty obvious Google didn't like the idea, but ended up doing it anyway after everyone else did so.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                      Yeah, when IE10 shipped with it on, i heard that most advertisers decided to ignore it. I'm not sure whatever happened with that, but their logic was that it was supposed to be an active choice by the user, not a default.

                      Of course, what they really meant was that it was only supposed to impact the single digit percent of people who really care about their privacy enough to change a setting, and not the masses.

                      Chrome, on the other hand, had to be dragged kicking and screaming into supporting DNT at all. It was pretty obvious Google didn't like the idea, but ended up doing it anyway after everyone else did so.
                      Of course Chrome didnt want to do it lol, Google makes their money off tracking =P

                      As far as the single digit percentage of users.... True. Which is fine. We single digit who DO know can use it and enjoy the lack-of-tracking. Everyone else who doesnt know can be tracked.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                        Of course Chrome didnt want to do it lol, Google makes their money off tracking =P

                        As far as the single digit percentage of users.... True. Which is fine. We single digit who DO know can use it and enjoy the lack-of-tracking. Everyone else who doesnt know can be tracked.
                        On the other hand, I like being tracked, as strange as it may sound. I'd much rather see targeted ads than random ads, because they are at least not totally boring to look at. Also, the fact that it can remember which ads I want to see muted is a definite plus as well.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                          On the other hand, I like being tracked, as strange as it may sound. I'd much rather see targeted ads than random ads, because they are at least not totally boring to look at. Also, the fact that it can remember which ads I want to see muted is a definite plus as well.
                          As a long time Firefox user with Adblock Plus I didn't know some sites had ads until I visited them with other browsers so I much prefer seeing no ads at all.

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