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  • #46
    Originally posted by Bucic View Post
    If you consider Gnome Shell a bad shell, try Unity first. I did. When I tried Gnome Shell... let me just put it this way - What a #%^#$ relieffff! The thing works, well, differently, but performance is way better. Also keep in mind that Canonical does pet-bugging with the Unity. The same bugs persist since the very first version of Unity with no perspective of them being resolved! All you silly optimists out there - this is a shell for you. The bugs will SURELY be resolved
    Upstream gnome isn't much better in that respect. It seems each gnome release is coming with more and more very obvious bugs that should have been caught and fixed before final release.

    Totem's fullscreen controls don't work with many touchpads, this bug has been around since totem 3.0. I've seen this happen on 3 separate laptops from 3 different manufacturers. You'd think a basic feature on the *default* video player wouldn't be broken for so long.
    Since gnome 3.6 brasero is completely unable to add mp3's to an audio cd. Bug reported ages ago but no activity on the bug report (and is generally a buggy mess anyway)
    GDM 3.6 is just super buggy in general. it loves to often hang on logout for example
    The new lock screen is ridiculously buggy, it will randomly start acting very "slow" (you hit "lock screen" and then it locks like a full minute later. Sometimes it also takes forever to unlock too.
    They break/change screensaver inhibiting with almost every fucking release, so media player's have to play catch-up
    the "lock screen after" option appears to be completely broken in gnome 3.6
    gnome-shell still tends to randomly hang on login sometimes, I've seen this on a variety of hardware. doesn't happen often, but real annoying when it does
    Gnome-shell 3.6 has a massive memory leak, everytime you click an item on the top panel memory usage rises and never gets released
    tracker crashes *all *the*time.
    Empathy/telepathy is just a horrific, buggy mess. still is and always has been. First thing I have to do on any install is install pidgin

    /rant

    I like both gnome-shell and unity as interfaces, but they are both way too buggy and need to step up QA.
    Last edited by bwat47; 01-19-2013, 04:36 PM.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by finalzone View Post
      The problem with 2 panels layers is the clutter they both bring. In this case, clearly a nostalgic value. Gnome Legacy is on the way FYI.

      Cinnamon is nothing more than a polished extended Gnome Shell rather than a true fork. It heavily depends on the core of Gnome 3 to be fully functional. The existence of extensions render the argument that Gnome does not care moot. The real issues are those whiners making a lot of noise without trying a desktop environment like Gnome Shell while aware of the open development but chose not to participate.

      Touch oriented desktop is inevitable, it needs maturity. Be glad Gnome 3 allows the use of both keyboard and mouse while trying to bridge the gap between touchscreen and keyboard. Change is a natural process, new generation of developers and users emerge everyday.
      Redhat has a habit to backport new features including GPU drivers for enterprise environment. The key issue is obviously communication which is the kryptonite.
      In a word: yes. Although I disagree on the screen clutter argument.

      Anyway, you would think with Gnome Legacy on the way a lot of the winging would have died down...
      Last edited by Hamish Wilson; 01-19-2013, 04:54 PM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
        A also install KDE (Chakra to be more specific) from time to time so I could rest from Ubuntu and see what's new, I like it. BUT, digiKam is useless when it comes to RAW editing (and since I'm a photographer I can't bear it). I know that I could use GTK+ apps under KDE (Darktable FTW!), but that makes the system looks absolutely inconsistent......
        I have not had that much trouble with QT applications on Xfce (GTK+). Just needed to force the themes:
        http://www.webupd8.org/2012/01/get-b...ations-in.html

        So I imagine there is something similar that can be done in reverse.

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        • #49
          Gnome 3.4 was just about perfect for me, but Gnome 3.6 feels like a step backwards.

          Some of the new "features" that Gnome 3.6 introduced that I do not like are:
          1. You must now slide the lock screen upwards with the mouse to unlock
          2. There is now a huge notification bar at the bottom, with icon's being 3x larger than in previous versions
          3. Nautilus was dumbed down significantly. It also runs full-screen by default, and there is no intuitive way to unmaximize it.

          I can understand the above if Gnome 3 were running on a Tablet. In fact, the above changes would make lots of sense on a Tablet; however, on a desktop PC, its kind of ridiculous for me to swipe up with my mouse to unlock the screen. (yes I know you can hit ESC, but why must I now take an additional step that seems to be designed for a tablet?)

          Furthermore, the huge notification bar at the bottom is now 3x the size, and the icons look terribly ugly and blurry on a desktop PC. It's a shame that my favorite extension from 3.4 no longer works in 3.6, as I used to have an extension that would move those notification icons to the top activity bar... so now I am forced to see a huge dropbox icon whenever I bring up the notification bar... might be great on a tablet, but terrible on my PC.

          Finally, what were the dev's thinking when they removed the capability to unmaximize Nautilus? For weeks, I was forced to use nautilus full screen, until I finally got so frustrated I googled how to unmaximize it, and found that you must click-drag the window to do so. Why??? Every other single window in Gnome has a standard way of resizing it except for Nautilus. Again, might be great for tablets where you use one app at a time, but on my PC, I'm often using file operations in combination with some other application.

          I feel Gnome 3.6 was a step back from Gnome 3.4. Lets hope 3.8 addresses the above issues.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by finalzone View Post
            Be glad Gnome 3 allows the use of both keyboard and mouse
            OMG, this is the best, most concise, and most accurate description of the GNOME project's vision.

            I, for one, thank them for allowing me to use a mouse AND a keyboard (both!)

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
              I have not had that much trouble with QT applications on Xfce (GTK+). Just needed to force the themes:
              http://www.webupd8.org/2012/01/get-b...ations-in.html

              So I imagine there is something similar that can be done in reverse.
              No, GTK is not that flexible. The only thing that can be done is to use the same theme for both GTK and Qt. For example, QtCurve or Oxygen.

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              • #52
                No, GTK is not that flexible. The only thing that can be done is to use the same theme for both GTK and Qt. For example, QtCurve or Oxygen.
                I use this, and mainly run KDE. You can easily install gtk themes and pick and chose which one all your gtk apps will use, or use one of the qt themes ported to gtk that come with kde. In the end, I don't think anyone can be really mad at either toolkit - it is just like how Java Swing skins everything its own way and doesn't accept any theming at all. My only gripe is that gtk2 and gtk3 apps can look radically different under the same theme, and aspects of one don't necessarily correlate to the other 1 to 1 all the time, so some themes look fine with gtk2 apps and look like ass in gtk2 or vice versa. That might be a problem with old versions of qt, but I just haven't run into any qt apps not built against 4 anymore.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by zanny View Post
                  I use this, and mainly run KDE. You can easily install gtk themes and pick and chose which one all your gtk apps will use, or use one of the qt themes ported to gtk that come with kde. In the end, I don't think anyone can be really mad at either toolkit - it is just like how Java Swing skins everything its own way and doesn't accept any theming at all. My only gripe is that gtk2 and gtk3 apps can look radically different under the same theme, and aspects of one don't necessarily correlate to the other 1 to 1 all the time, so some themes look fine with gtk2 apps and look like ass in gtk2 or vice versa. That might be a problem with old versions of qt, but I just haven't run into any qt apps not built against 4 anymore.
                  Last time I tried that it made Firefox act strange. It's not as nice as QGtkStyle, which mostly just works fine wherever there isn't an element "lost in translation" somehow.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
                    I
                    Anyway, you would think with Gnome Legacy on the way a lot of the winging would have died down...
                    Think about this expression: empty barrels made a lot of noise.

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                    • #55
                      I want to clarify the directions the GNOME project is taking, and to explain the rationale for various decisions. My end goal is to make people understand the project better, and trust it again.

                      See, I don't really care about the rationale behind Gnome3's design decisions. Not sure where "trust" enters into the equation unless it's of the form "Trust us, our way works better" in which case the hubris is both astounding and offensive. Anyway, you didn't lose me as a user because I stopped trusting you. You lost me as a user because the new environment interfered with my workflow and, hence, productivity. Worse, it wasn't clear how to tweak things to feel productive again.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by cbamber85 View Post
                        So am I the only one who left KDE 4 for Gnome 3? I'll keep quiet in this flame war then...
                        No you are not alone; I'm definately with you.

                        The reason for that is not because Gnome 3 is better; it is not. In fact; KDE4 is the most advanced, beautiful desktop with top notch functionality and has superb resource management.

                        So the reason I went with Gnome 3 is simple; I have Attention Deficit Disorder and Gnome 3 strips visual noice and forces me to organize workspaces. With a dual monitor setup and basic tiling, this kicks ass for me.

                        Gnome 2 was just KDE4 stripped from usefulness, but Gnome 3 is different and just hits the usability sweetspot for me; Windows 7 tiling, expose effect to organize everything (not just windows) and a notification mechanism that doesn't torture my attention.

                        If I didn't have ADD, I would definately be using KDE4, though.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by developer View Post
                          Those preferring KDE, are for a big surprise in KDE 4.10.

                          The minimize/maximize/close buttons have moved to the left, the window title has moved to the right, and there is a new menu on left, that is vertical like GNOME's.

                          Personally, I suggest all people that ask me, to use XFCE, until LXDE is finished. Myself am using Lubuntu with LXDE.
                          Mmmmm... NO, NO, and NO. You might have used Kubuntu. I'm right now using KDE 4.10 RC3 on Chakra and I see nothing of what you are describing here. And, by the way, everything you said is a DEFAULT option in your distro. If you don't want that, switch your distro, or launch your System Settings app, go to "Workspace Appearance | Window Decoration | Configure Buttons..." and disable "Use custom button positions", or configure your minimize/maximize/close, window title and menu button as you please.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Akka View Post
                            The first is video is the uploders personal configuration.

                            The article is about support for placing your menu as a button in the window decoration, it is not activated as default. And it think it is up to the theme where it is placed if activated. They have also two different sorts of global menus beside the default traditional kde menu. One you can place in the Panel and one independent of the panel.
                            Actually, KDE users have the chance to customize their systems to look like that.

                            1. The Icon-only Taskbar gets installed with the KDE Plasma Addons package in your distro.
                            2. The weather plasmoid is yaWP, your distro can carry that package too.
                            3. The menu is Lancelot.
                            4. The background is KDE DreamDesktop. You can download it from here: http://www.jarzebski.pl/dreamdesktop...-0.1.0.tar.bz2

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Alejandro Nova View Post
                              Actually, KDE users have the chance to customize their systems to look like that.

                              1. The Icon-only Taskbar gets installed with the KDE Plasma Addons package in your distro.
                              2. The weather plasmoid is yaWP, your distro can carry that package too.
                              3. The menu is Lancelot.
                              4. The background is KDE DreamDesktop. You can download it from here: http://www.jarzebski.pl/dreamdesktop...-0.1.0.tar.bz2
                              I never heard of lancelot and tried it out. I still just use kickoff for everything. I think that nepomuk is only 2 or so revisions from being as smooth as other system indexers.

                              I do want to mention IconTasks is a must have, and I hope that kde considers including it in the base set of applets. That applet is magic since it can use the unity specific extensions some applications have for controls.

                              But yeah, KDE is stupid customizable, and you can get plasma to look like anything.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post

                                Originally posted by finalzone View Post
                                Originally Posted by finalzone View Post
                                Be glad Gnome 3 allows the use of both keyboard and mouse
                                OMG, this is the best, most concise, and most accurate description of the GNOME project's vision.

                                I, for one, thank them for allowing me to use a mouse AND a keyboard (both!)
                                Quiet, they'll hear you!!!

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