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  • GNOME 3.x Will Bring Back Some GNOME 2 Features

    Phoronix: GNOME 3.x Will Bring Back Some GNOME 2 Features

    Earlier this month it was decided that GNOME 3.8 would get rid of the GNOME Shell Fallback mode used for running the desktop environment in a way similar to the GNOME 2 "classic" environment while also not requiring any 3D GPU/driver configuration. Earlier today there was basically a call for forking the GNOME Classic/Fallback code so it could live on, but now it's been announced that some of the user-interface/experience elements will be brought to the GNOME 3.x world in a manner that's more easy for users to optionally enable...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTIzMzY

  • #2
    We'll see how this works out, but this may end up being a better option for me than MATE. I'm still using a vintage Linux Mint release with Gnome 2.32, and am holding off on upgrading until there's an obvious "best choice" for how to retain my beloved interface.

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    • #3
      They screw up badly calling names those who don't like their crazy decisions and after a long while they give in partially while keeping an arrogant face.

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      • #4
        heh

        sounds like the metrics aren't too hot.

        but seriously: "Going forward it will be easier to enable the GNOME Shell to exhibit old GNOME 2.x functionality like ... minimize/maximize buttons..."

        ummm... lolwut? Their new window decorator doesn't have min / max buttons? how the hell do you min / max a window?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mark45 View Post
          They screw up badly calling names those who don't like their crazy decisions and after a long while they give in partially while keeping an arrogant face.
          I'm not exactly sure if I'd call abandoning the fallback mode 'giving in to those who don't like our crazy decisions'. I think the extension story is important to keep in mind regardless of which extensions might be prioritized, since a lack of updated extensions has been a huge issue of late.

          I don't see a lot of arrogance, but I do see a lot of people ostracizing the designers. I just wish the discussion didn't have to wind up so antagonistic. If anyone in particular has offended you, I'm sorry, but that's not the intention of GNOME in the slightest. It may be a sign that we need to take the social aspect of our community a bit more seriously if we're sending that kind of message.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by johnc View Post
            ummm... lolwut? Their new window decorator doesn't have min / max buttons? how the hell do you min / max a window?
            Assuming that you're actually asking this question, you can maximize a window more easily by dragging it to the window edge you would like it to fill (top to fill the whole screen), or if your screen is especially large, just double-click on any portion of the titlebar. This is clearly much easier than aiming for a square button on the edge of a window, but perhaps not as discoverable as some would like.

            So far as minimizing goes, GNOME is trying to avoid the behavior of hiding applications in an abstracted list. It's not a very natural behavior, and it may only seem so because most of us have been using task lists for a very long time. They don't represent much, and they are usually small targets for the mouse.

            If you end up with more windows on the screen than you can manage, you can easily begin categorizing them in the overview. I understand that sometimes you don't always have a clear idea of how to group tasks, so a trick I like to use is middle-clicking the titlebar to send the window I've been looking at back.

            To be clear, while the overview is a good, natural way to manage tasks, the designers are aware of the issues with certain workflows and they're still trying to come up with better solutions to those problems.

            Aside from that, GNOME tries to encourage you to focus on one task at a time, as reduced distractions are better for your productivity. Of course, if you're not working on anything that may just mean helping you focus better on having fun.

            Not to mention that mutter does have minimize and maximize, they just arent enabled by default.
            Last edited by scionicspectre; 11-21-2012, 10:33 PM.

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            • #7
              This is not a bad idea. The problem with extensions is that they are highly prone to breaking with each update, so having the GNOME guys test the more useful ones before release and package them nicely will make them a bit less of a hack than they currently are.

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              • #8
                The GNOME developers also have no plans to endorse the Cinnamon fork.
                lol
                Cinnamon is already a huge thing now. It needs no endorsement from the "GNOME Corporation inc. ltd"..

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                • #9
                  GNOME is becoming more and more idiotic each day.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by scionicspectre View Post
                    Aside from that, GNOME tries to encourage you to focus on one task at a time, as reduced distractions are better for your productivity.
                    I'm gonna do my best not to swear, as this really infuriates me.

                    My task as a programmer involves using my Linux workstation and 30" LCD to manage my source code editor (Eclipse), a Firefox window full of tabs for the pages for the site I'm working on editing the code for, likely also Chrome and Opera windows for the same, another browser window full of tabs containing the various reference documentation I need along with Google search results, etc, an Open Office window containing the project requirements document describing the features I'm working on, a gedit window for storing, editing, and copy/pasting code snippets and other stuff I need to remember, and a Pidgin window to my coworker who might be helping me test this stuff.

                    The only thing the new Gnome Shell encourages - is making my hand hurt from all the extra mousing and clicking I need to do.

                    (When it was first released, I posted a more detailed review at http://forums.fedoraforum.org/archiv.../t-263609.html )

                    I have been surviving inside fallback mode, but, sorry, I think this is too little too late, and I'm going to go find a shell written by people who use their computer as more than a "one window at a time" iPad-like toy.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hubick View Post
                      I'm gonna do my best not to swear, as this really infuriates me.

                      My task as a programmer involves using my Linux workstation and 30" LCD to manage my source code editor (Eclipse), a Firefox window full of tabs for the pages for the site I'm working on editing the code for, likely also Chrome and Opera windows for the same, another browser window full of tabs containing the various reference documentation I need along with Google search results, etc, an Open Office window containing the project requirements document describing the features I'm working on, a gedit window for storing, editing, and copy/pasting code snippets and other stuff I need to remember, and a Pidgin window to my coworker who might be helping me test this stuff.

                      The only thing the new Gnome Shell encourages - is making my hand hurt from all the extra mousing and clicking I need to do.

                      (When it was first released, I posted a more detailed review at http://forums.fedoraforum.org/archiv.../t-263609.html )

                      I have been surviving inside fallback mode, but, sorry, I think this is too little too late, and I'm going to go find a shell written by people who use their computer as more than a "one window at a time" iPad-like toy.
                      Why should they care about a troll like you? I'm sure it exist other environment you can use when Gnome is so bad..

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hubick View Post
                        I'm gonna do my best not to swear, as this really infuriates me.

                        My task as a programmer involves using my Linux workstation and 30" LCD to manage my source code editor (Eclipse), a Firefox window full of tabs for the pages for the site I'm working on editing the code for, likely also Chrome and Opera windows for the same, another browser window full of tabs containing the various reference documentation I need along with Google search results, etc, an Open Office window containing the project requirements document describing the features I'm working on, a gedit window for storing, editing, and copy/pasting code snippets and other stuff I need to remember, and a Pidgin window to my coworker who might be helping me test this stuff.

                        The only thing the new Gnome Shell encourages - is making my hand hurt from all the extra mousing and clicking I need to do.

                        (When it was first released, I posted a more detailed review at http://forums.fedoraforum.org/archiv.../t-263609.html )

                        I have been surviving inside fallback mode, but, sorry, I think this is too little too late, and I'm going to go find a shell written by people who use their computer as more than a "one window at a time" iPad-like toy.
                        Well I think as he says, our workflow isn't really compatible with their vision. They seem to be going with the Chrome-style minimalism since the average user can do just fine with an "iPad-like toy".

                        I'm a software developer too and use a dual-monitor layout with four workspaces to help layout and organize all the windows and stuff I have up on a regular basis. I've found that Unity is bearable, but crimps a little bit on my abilities. It's about as usable for software development as Windows or OS X. It does some things better, and other things aren't as good. But so far in terms of the best combination of ease-of-use, flexibility, power, and getting-out-of-my-way, it seems like GNOME2 + compiz has been my best experience so far. Despite some glitches and bugs, it just makes it so easy to go back and forth between the types of windows you mention.

                        I did give the new GNOME Shell about 5-10 mins and scratched my head so often that I just couldn't see how I was going to make it to work for my needs.

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                        • #13
                          Well, I am a programmer too, and had basically no problem adapting my workflow to Gnome-Shell. So perhaps we can stop the "Gnome-shell is only for stupid normal users". Firstly because normal users are not stupid, and second, because it is not true.

                          It's amusing t(or sad) o first see all the "omg! Gnome broke my workflow". Then Gnome are going out of their way to restore your workflow, and people are still like "Doesn't matter, you suck Gnome!".
                          Stop for two seconds and consider the signals you are sending the developers, and whether you think it will improve your chances to influence the project.

                          Also, it is quite clear from the comments that most people have not given Gnome-Shell a chance. Which seems strange, because you wouldn't go online and throw shit around if you hadn't given it a try, right guys? Right?
                          I mean, the "so much mouse clicking" is simply not true. I am using GS on a laptop and touchpad and if I *had* to use large mouse gestures and lots of clicking to get things done, it would not fly. Fortunately, GS is actually really nice to navigate with keyboard and touchpad.

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                          • #14
                            I don't understand why people are bitching. Don't like it, don't use it. It's not like windows where you are stuck with one interface.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                              Phoronix: GNOME 3.x Will Bring Back Some GNOME 2 Features

                              Earlier this month it was decided that GNOME 3.8 would get rid of the GNOME Shell Fallback mode used for running the desktop environment in a way similar to the GNOME 2 "classic" environment while also not requiring any 3D GPU/driver configuration. Earlier today there was basically a call for forking the GNOME Classic/Fallback code so it could live on, but now it's been announced that some of the user-interface/experience elements will be brought to the GNOME 3.x world in a manner that's more easy for users to optionally enable...

                              http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTIzMzY
                              Not "but now". It was announced in the same blog posting from "earlier". If Phoronix would actually read what it links to.

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