Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Features Coming In For The GNOME 3.8 Desktop

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by Larian View Post
    Wow. I like the backhanded way in which you basically concede all my points, and then tell me that since you never had a problem, it can't really be a problem for anybody. All the issues I've mentioned have happened to me on my personal home machine, which I administrate. And I shouldn't have had to deal with ANY of them. I've beaten PulseAudio into submission after two bloody years of updates (the first versions most certainly left me with several apps that didn't make noise anymore, and I still have to set the padsp flag for some stuff!), and some people here STILL can't get HDMI audio to work through PulseAudio in a 64 bit environment. I avoid this last problem by using onboard audio, but that's a workaround, not a solution.
    It was not my intention to belittle your problems. I am just pointing out that in general people seem to have little trouble with PA, or the new UI in GNOME3.

    You see, I'm proud of the way my computer works. I spend a lot of time customizing it and tweaking things to my liking. My workflow is unique to me, and that's the way it ought to be. It's why I use Linux and not OSX or Windows - I'm supposed to have choices; I'm supposed to be able to have my computer run my way. When I spend uncounted hours growing my desktop and an update comes along and trashes the way I use my machine ... yeah, I take that personally.
    Understandable, I was a tinkerer for quite a while as well. Still, the "problem" is that new stuff will always be a mixed bag of improvements and regressions. You either take it or leave it. I see the same type of issues in other communities.

    And lastly, I'm not up in arms about an update installing a new DE - I lose my shit over an update deleting what you were using before by ambush. If I can figure out how to do a parallel install of 8 different desktop environments (yeah, EIGHT!), I find it hard to believe that Canonical just has its hands tied. If you're going to defend having an update completely remove your DE, without notice, and install some half-baked replacement that you have to manually bolt on fixes for so it will work the way the old one did ... we just can't continue this conversation.
    I am not going to defend Canonical or Ubuntu, as I am no longer using that particular distro. I will just reiterate: Yes, I think some kind of notice before upgrading that says "just so you know, things will look different after the upgrade" would have been nice. But no, I do not think it is the end of the world. If you are upgrading your operating system and do not consider the fact that things might change, then I think you are a bit naive.

    I am also having a hard time understanding how someone who "has a unique workflow" and "is proud of the way their computer works" could have missed the fact that their distribution is changing desktop environment.

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by kigurai View Post
      If you are upgrading your operating system and do not consider the fact that things might change, then I think you are a bit naive.

      I am also having a hard time understanding how someone who "has a unique workflow" and "is proud of the way their computer works" could have missed the fact that their distribution is changing desktop environment.
      My apologies for misconstruing your argument. I've been ill lately, compounded with other annoyances. It does things to the mood.

      As you suggest, perhaps I am a bit naive to expect updates to keep their hands off my system (by not deleting every single installed DE that it can find, let's say), but I maintain that's how things ought to be. I assure you that I was aware the update would install Unity and GNOME3. However, I was not aware it would do so via scorched earth tactics. That really would've been nice to know beforehand. At least on this we appear to agree.

      Your suggestion that one can either "take it or leave it" when it comes to updates which break things sounds nice. But that may be more than a little naive as well. My complaint on this point is that taking or leaving X first implies that one is informed well enough to make an intelligent choice. It also requires that a real choice is present. PulseAudio was not a choice, it was a decree from on-high. Ditto for GNOME3. What we got was assurances sounding like "TRY THIS NEW THING WE MADE! IT'S REALLY GREAT AND YOU'LL LOVE IT!" And then we tried it. And it was poop. And there was no way to roll things back other than a clean install.
      Last edited by Larian; 11-21-2012, 10:55 AM.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Larian View Post
        My apologies for misconstruing your argument. I've been ill lately, compounded with other annoyances. It does things to the mood.
        It's ok. No hard feelings.

        I do realize that the upgrades/new stuff had different impact on different systems, and that I probably got away pretty easy. I also DO know the feeling of things breaking (Nvidia/CUDA, I am looking at you!), but I get sad when it seems like it has become fashionable to hate specific projects. Especially when the reasons for the hate is vague and/or missing.

        Comment

        Working...
        X